+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,273
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    10
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Talking Giving birth? You need optimal foetal positioning!

    Optimal Foetal Positioning Essential and FREE for all birthing women!

    http://www.horns.freeserve.co.uk/ofp.htm

    'Optimal Foetal Positioning' is a theory developed by a midwife, Jean Sutton, who found that the mother's position and movement could influence the way her baby lay in the womb in the final weeks of pregnancy. Many difficult labours result from 'malpresentation', where the baby's position makes it hard for the head to move through the pelvis, so changing the way the baby lies could make birth easier for mother and child.

    UK Midwife Archives page on presentation, from the Association of Radical Midwives (www.midwifery.org.uk)

    The Midwife Archives on the gentlebirth.org website have an amazing collection of wisdom and experience on just about every subject related to pregnancy and birth. The pages on positioning start at http://www.gentlebirth.org/archives/position.html

    Belly mapping, labour and pregnancy positions.
    http://www.spinningbabies.com

    Diaphragmatic release to move a posterior baby.
    http://www.naturalchildbirth.org/nat...or/labor29.htm

    Pelvic rocking and other OFP manoeuvres.
    http://pregnancytoday.com/reference/...ositioning.htm

    A birth story from a woman who had a poorly positioned baby and a c-sec then a great vbac using OFP.
    http://www.victoriousbirth.com/ofp.htm
    Last edited by JanetF; 30-12-2005 at 16:35.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,023
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    0
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    This is fantastic stuff. I have seen this work miricles. Thanks Janet for finding it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,274
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked
    0
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Hi,
    When I was pregnant with dd, I tryed optimum fetal positioning as bub was postiror (sp??) and not engaged, and it did nothing for me. Do you need to do them for a long time, as I did them for around 4 weeks and nothing???
    Just wondering!!!
    E

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,273
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    10
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    It's practiced from around 30 weeks, as a lifestyle, not just short bursts. So you sleep on your left, you always sit upright, not with your feet high etc, spend considerable time on your hands and knees and always make sure bubs is in the right spot or correct it swiftly. (See the articles for the exact list!) About 4% of babies are persistantly OP in birth and it's not always a problem but hospital births with early rupture of membranes (which can cement a poorly aligned baby by removing their cushion to rotate on easily) and women lying on their backs so they can't help their baby move forward lead to many problems with poorly aligned babies. Noticed how many women on bubhub say their babies were posterior in labour? If OFP was practiced, midwifery techniques like the Pink Kit employed and no one strapped down with an epidural without an emergency, we wouldn't see it happening like that. OP babies are rare in home births because women are active and undrugged, therefore having undrugged babies who can move themselves as well, and midwives help their clients with OFP all through their pregnancies.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    10,654
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked
    27
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Thanks for that info Janet!
    Only wish I'd had it 15 months ago.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,846
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    3
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    If only I knew that before! Didn't think my labour was much different or unusual (apparently because posterier is quite common now)...

    It's good to know for future use and I probably won't be spending that much time on the couch as I did first time around! lol

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,273
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    10
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    The power is ours, sisters!!!! Use it!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,372
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    0
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Thomas is quite stubbornly Posterior, even though I sleep on my left... spend loads of time on all fours, and his placenta is posterior... He is supposed to prefer to face it LOL.. still I have little arms and feet sticking out of my belly most of the time. I figure he'll rotate during labour if he won't now he'll have to be quick though, my last DD only took an hour from first contraction to being in mamas arms!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,273
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    10
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Some bubbas just are, aren't they?! I've a friend whose babies ALWAYS rotate into posterior just before she pushes them out. Fortunately she's always at home so no problems but I think sometimes she's tempted to try another just to see if she can get an OA baby through birth

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,381
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    0
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Hey there,

    I just thought I would add my little 2 cents worth to this thread.

    When I was pregnant with little dude he was both breech and posterior.

    Optimal foetal positioning was actually gone through with me with the midwives.

    They also recommended acupuncture and massage, with a shen therapist who was well known for turning breech babies.

    I held my positions and had the acupuncture and yep, the dude turned and was all lovely and ready to go.

    I ended up having to have an emergency c-section though!


 

Similar Threads

  1. I.B.S. and giving birth. ESpecially relating to water birth.
    By Sweetpez in forum Pregnancy & Birth General Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-12-2012, 13:04
  2. When should I start optimal positioning?
    By Moxy in forum Pregnancy & Birth General Chat
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-03-2012, 17:48
  3. Giving birth in Tamworth
    By Cromo in forum Seeking a Maternity Hospital
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 28-01-2012, 19:57

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

FEATURED SUPPORTER
Swim AustraliaSwim Australia are the leading learn-to-swim experts, and national swim school authority. With over 600 Registered Swim ...

ADVERTISEMENT