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  1. #11
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    Women should absolutely have autonomy over their bodies, but asking for a c-section in the absence of a medical reason isn't just exercising a right to make decisions about your own body, it's also asking a doctor to perform major surgery which they in their professional opinion consider higher risk than vaginal birth. That is an ethical consideration for them and they are entitled to balance your reasons against the risk, they're not just guns for hire.

    I'd say the thing to do is either take out phi, or speak to someone like the head of obstetrics at your public hospital now and clarify the circumstances in which they'd agree to an elective caesarean.

    Eta: Your anxiety may well be reason enough for them to agree, you don't lose anything by asking the question. If you're not 100% decided another thing to be aware of is that good doctors are well-equipped to deal with anxiety around birth, the public system imo sometimes gets a bad rap, but like anything people's experiences vary.
    Last edited by Kalina; 24-12-2020 at 14:00.

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  3. #12
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    I had an elective c-section in a public hospital with my first baby (but it was 16 years ago now) due mostly to anxiety. I too posted on here and got very similar responses then, I still remember, ouch!

    When I had my DD I didn't say anything to the midwives about it at all ever. I waited until the OB appointment between 20-30 weeks and spoke directly with the doctor. As soon as I started talking about it I was inconsolable. She said that's it we aren't into forcing mothers to give birth vaginally. It was signed off and I had my first baby by elective c-section at 38.5 weeks. There was a lot of lectures from people around me and the midwives (but the doctor had warned me of this). Then there was constant requests for mental health referrals.....which I wanted nothing to do with the at the hospital.

    I was in hospital 3 nights and went home early morning day 4 as i had had enough being in hospital, I would have gone home the day before but I had a reaction to the medical tape from one hip to the other, which hurt more than the c-section wound. My baby was happy and healthy and is now a wonderful caring, mostly healthy 16 year old.

    So I'm saying there is hope, things have possibly changed in 16 years but it is worth talking to someone about it.

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  5. #13
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    As a health provider i am going to agree with most that given there is no underlying medical requirement you will be hard pressed to get a public hospital to willingly perform a medically unnecessary proecure that puts you and baby at risk. If your heart is set on a C Section then i suggest taking out private heath as advocated by others already. To a point yes you should have autonomy over your body but not at the expense of the hospital when it isn't warrented. Not all private obstetricans will agree to a C Section either for non medical reasons and that is what makes them a good OB. I had asked with both of my kids due to physical limitations for a c section as first choice and waa encouraged not to. As a nurse yes i have seen the complications left from natural childbirth, i have also nursed numerous women coming in for repairs from prolapses caused by pregnancy not birth so remember having a c section does not prevent these things, prolapse and incontinece are pregnancy related not birth related. Have had patients ans friends with babies needing extensive time in nicu and scn post birth due to complications from a caeser birth and patients with non healing scars requiring hospitalization away from their newborn. Worst case scenarios yes but have to be acknowledged that a c section is major surgery and unless necessary not the advisable path to take.

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  7. #14
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    I'm with many of the others. You can try but is expect to be knocked back.

    I'd expect they would prefer to be putting tax payers money towards a psychologist for the anxiety and education/physio etc.

    When you think about the public system, if you want things done at the tax payers expense then you go on a wait list. Things like getting kids tonsils out etc you can be waiting like a year.

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  9. #15
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    Default Maternal Request C-section through public system is it possible?

    Short answer, no. I asked for one because I wanted my tubes tied and was refused.

    In the end I carried a large baby and then they offered me a c section because of higher complications giving birth vaginally so it was a medical reason in the end but I decided I couldn’t do it as I had two toddlers at home I had to look after and couldn’t sit around waiting to recover and instead accepted to be induced earlier. I’ve had four vaginal births and I’m glad I have never had a c section, don’t think that a c section doesn’t result in any trauma, I’ve had people say they’ve had issues with their scars etc didn’t heal properly and also experienced trauma.

    it’s great to have the option of a c section for medical purposes, but a vaginal birth can also be really rewarding, the midwives have a lot of experiance these days, I think most people have high anxiety over giving birth naturally and what could go wrong but that’s normal!! Good luck with it xx
    Last edited by MuMtORiLeYandLeO; 24-12-2020 at 23:30.

  10. #16
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    I was private and had a CS, my baby was a bit big (4.2kg at just on 39 weeks) but i requested it.

    I didn’t regret it, I probably would have ended up in a CS anyway. However with bubba 2 it did make it much harder. The physical limitations are hard with a toddler. I found it much harder.

    Since you’re not pregnant yet you have time to take out PHI.

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  12. #17
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    I had an elective through the public system.

    I went in with my reasons, namely that I was likely to end up needing an emergency one anyway as I would be induced and had a lot of risk factors for failed induction. I also listed my anxiety about getting Bub here safely after TTC for so long and IVF.

    They didn’t even hesitate - booked on the spot. This was with the OB though - midwives who do mostly antenatal care I’ve found are very anti c-section.

    I think going in having done my research on my risk factors (BMI, GDM, previous issues with artificial hormones) and already being on medication for my mental health helped.

    Turned out I didn’t need to go that far anyway as Bub ended up being breech

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  14. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pcos30 View Post
    They didn’t even hesitate - booked on the spot. This was with the OB though - midwives who do mostly antenatal care I’ve found are very anti c-section.
    This would be because as midwives we can’t give any kind of guarantee that a maternal request caesarean will even be considered by the doctors as it’s not within our scope of practice. We have to promote a vaginal birth as that’s what midwives specialise in.. normal vaginal birth.

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  16. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pcos30 View Post
    I think going in having done my research on my risk factors (BMI, GDM, previous issues with artificial hormones) and already being on medication for my mental health helped.
    If you have risk factors it's no longer a case of 'It's my right' but rather one of safety, and falls under medical reasons.
    In your case, the person that booked you in on the spot had enough foresight and common sense to realise that those risk factors would still be present at 38 weeks. A different scenario from the OP.

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  18. #20
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    I had an elective c section, the history of issues with my cervix weren’t a huge concern to the OB but he did say he wouldn’t support a lengthy active labour due to my age. He supported an elective c section and in the end we went early due to PE. Baby didn’t need SCN and my incision is neat and healed well.

    All that being said, I travelled 1.5 hours from my local hospital to a private facility with private OB.

    I agree that the choice of delivery should be yours, however it isn’t something the system supports. Get PHI make sure it’s top level and pick the OB you want. Or pay out of pocket for the service of a private facility and OB.


 

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