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  1. #11
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    :-) I can offer that. I've never been able to tell who was 17 or who was 18 in Yr 12. I dont think 1 years age difference makes any difference at that stage. I did teach 2 children over the last 10 years who were 16 in Yr 12, bith were boys and that was noticeable in terms of maturity and social interaction. One child was accelarated as his parents thoight he was a genius (he wasnt) and the other child must jave started kinder when he had only just turned 4. They had a lot of difficulty regulating their emotions and basically would behave like Yr10 kids, was actually very noticable amd I felt sorry for them as they looked amd acted mich more like children than young adults. As a high school teacher, I would recommend if you were going to repeat your child, do it earlier rather than later, as in early primary school. I wouldnt wait to see and then decide to do it in high school. Much harder for them socially. Even if they can keep up academically, school os about mich more than just learning academically imo.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadowangel0205 View Post
    I'd be interested to hear a high school teachers opinion, especially senior - yr 11/12.

    if it really makes a difference or not, if they can tell (or not), and things that may stand out as obvious issues etc. And their personal opinion
    I do think a lot would come down to the individual child though
    Research I've read (sorry, haven't bookmarked to provide source) shows that the older kids in a cohort are initially at an advantage academically and in sports but that trend in results starts to level out in middle years (grades 5-8) and then swings slightly the other way.

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  5. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by gorgeousgeorge View Post
    :-) I can offer that. I've never been able to tell who was 17 or who was 18 in Yr 12. I dont think 1 years age difference makes any difference at that stage. I did teach 2 children over the last 10 years who were 16 in Yr 12, bith were boys and that was noticeable in terms of maturity and social interaction. One child was accelarated as his parents thoight he was a genius (he wasnt) and the other child must jave started kinder when he had only just turned 4. They had a lot of difficulty regulating their emotions and basically would behave like Yr10 kids, was actually very noticable amd I felt sorry for them as they looked amd acted mich more like children than young adults. As a high school teacher, I would recommend if you were going to repeat your child, do it earlier rather than later, as in early primary school. I wouldnt wait to see and then decide to do it in high school. Much harder for them socially. Even if they can keep up academically, school os about mich more than just learning academically imo.
    Thanks. I was 16 until May in my yr12 year some peers were 18 in the feb/march, before I was even 17... but academically we were on par, and socially I think we were fine. I think the only negative thing I found is when we had our breakup party, being only 17 1/2 I couldn't hit the night club with them, but honestly if that's the worst I have to complain about 🤷‍♀️ my parents let me have a few cruisers in controlled settings, as long as I agreed to call THEM - or another parent - if i(we) wanted to go elsewhere so I want getting in a car with a drunk teen. And we were a closer knit group of friends, we weren't silly, and did just that...responsibly I guess, even if I was underage...
    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    Research I've read (sorry, haven't bookmarked to provide source) shows that the older kids in a cohort are initially at an advantage academically and in sports but that trend in results starts to level out in middle years (grades 5-8) and then swings slightly the other way.
    I was quoted similar by ds1s kinder teacher about repeating earlier is most beneficial and less ripple effects when were repeated him in kinder (preschool), he was young, one of the youngest in the group but he struggled in other areas as well so we repeated there.

    He is quite proud now that ds2 is in kinder, to tell ds2 that he got 2 tastes and ds2 only gets 1 so he got more fun there

  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadowangel0205 View Post
    Thanks. I was 16 until May in my yr12 year some peers were 18 in the feb/march, before I was even 17... but academically we were on par, and socially I think we were fine. I think the only negative thing I found is when we had our breakup party, being only 17 1/2 I couldn't hit the night club with them, but honestly if that's the worst I have to complain about 🤷‍♀️ my parents let me have a few cruisers in controlled settings, as long as I agreed to call THEM - or another parent - if i(we) wanted to go elsewhere so I want getting in a car with a drunk teen. And we were a closer knit group of friends, we weren't silly, and did just that...responsibly I guess, even if I was underage...
    I was quoted similar by ds1s kinder teacher about repeating earlier is most beneficial and less ripple effects when were repeated him in kinder (preschool), he was young, one of the youngest in the group but he struggled in other areas as well so we repeated there.

    He is quite proud now that ds2 is in kinder, to tell ds2 that he got 2 tastes and ds2 only gets 1 so he got more fun there
    Yes me too, I turned 17 in March of Yr12. There were a few of us 1 year younger in our year group and it wasnt noticeable. Yes, wasn't able to legally do some things but it didnt really stop me . Was nice really to get lifts from everyone else for free. I had good friends and no trouble at school. I think its worse for boys much more with a 2 year age difference in Yr12 as 16 year old boys are really just beginning puberty while the 18 year old boys are basically men, some of them have beards and have really broadened in upper body, whereas the 16 year old boys I taught in Yr12 were dealing with their voices breaking etc... when all the other boys had already gone through that iykwim so the physical differences were noticable and its always a hard stage anyway let alone being the only kid out of 50 boys going through that. Kids can be really cruel at times so 2 years difference is too much imo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gorgeousgeorge View Post
    Yes me too, I turned 17 in March of Yr12. There were a few of us 1 year younger in our year group and it wasnt noticeable. Yes, wasn't able to legally do some things but it didnt really stop me . Was nice really to get lifts from everyone else for free. I had good friends and no trouble at school. I think its worse for boys much more with a 2 year age difference in Yr12 as 16 year old boys are really just beginning puberty while the 18 year old boys are basically men, some of them have beards and have really broadened in upper body, whereas the 16 year old boys I taught in Yr12 were dealing with their voices breaking etc... when all the other boys had already gone through that iykwim so the physical differences were noticable and its always a hard stage anyway let alone being the only kid out of 50 boys going through that. Kids can be really cruel at times so 2 years difference is too much imo.
    Oh yes i can see it would be so much harder for boys

  9. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gorgeousgeorge View Post
    :-) I can offer that. I've never been able to tell who was 17 or who was 18 in Yr 12. I dont think 1 years age difference makes any difference at that stage. I did teach 2 children over the last 10 years who were 16 in Yr 12, bith were boys and that was noticeable in terms of maturity and social interaction. One child was accelarated as his parents thoight he was a genius (he wasnt) and the other child must jave started kinder when he had only just turned 4. They had a lot of difficulty regulating their emotions and basically would behave like Yr10 kids, was actually very noticable amd I felt sorry for them as they looked amd acted mich more like children than young adults. As a high school teacher, I would recommend if you were going to repeat your child, do it earlier rather than later, as in early primary school. I wouldnt wait to see and then decide to do it in high school. Much harder for them socially. Even if they can keep up academically, school os about mich more than just learning academically imo.
    This is good insight.
    The primary school never allowed me to repeat her as she was on track academically but she literally goes under the radar and just “gets by” often saying she’s too scared to ask for help.
    She’ll be changing schools where she knows no one so they won’t be aware she is repeating. She’s open to the idea herself

  10. #17
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    I was 17 in year 12 and I don't think I would have necessarily benefitted from an extra year at all. I didn't really mature until my 20s anyway.

    She could utilise that extra year in better ways after year 12 - for example, if she didnt get into the uni course she wanted or age could take a gap year or whatever the case might be.

  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by musicalmummy View Post
    This is good insight.
    The primary school never allowed me to repeat her as she was on track academically but she literally goes under the radar and just “gets by” often saying she’s too scared to ask for help.
    She’ll be changing schools where she knows no one so they won’t be aware she is repeating. She’s open to the idea herself
    If she is changing school regardless, and she is only just keeping up, and she is open to the idea, then yes, absolutely i would repeat.

    I have a daughter in grade 4 that's the youngest in the grade. She mostly keeps up in most areas but struggles a lot with Math. I would not repeat her at her school as that would be unfair to her watch her friends move on and being left behind. If however she were changing schools I would. She is quite socially mature, but gets along with both younger and older kids so wouldn't feel like she was going backwards.


 

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