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  1. #1
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    Default BLW, Combo or Traditional weaning

    DD2 is 6 months, refuses to be spoon fed. Will feed herself with a loaded spoon and will pick up finger foods to suck on kinda eat or spit out but if I try spoon feed her she closes her mouth or looks away. She does also loves a mesh bag of fruit to suck on.

    DD1 was traditionally weaned at 4 months and did great. So BLW is all new to me, I’m sure she’s not getting much in by spoon feeding herself and the finger foods she manages to get in. I’m also so paranoid about choking, I know baby cpr ect but geez I never want to have to use it.

    Anyone doing/done BLW and can give me some tips? When does it get easier (and less messy)? Can they really get enough in to sustain themselves? Or should I keep persisting with a more traditional weaning path?

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    I did unplanned BLW with DD1 because she refused to be spoon fed mush but grabbed at actual food, so there was no way around it. I'm no expert though - essentially just steamed things thoroughly at first so they were super soft, then let her choose chunks and sticks of soft steamed veg to put in her own mouth. Strips of beef that I would hold at one end and she would gnaw at the other, then lamb cutlets with most of the meat taken off at first. Basically just make sure she can't get pieces of hard food in her mouth. It worked quite well for us - babies have such a strong gag reflex and it's protective. From memory I only had to pull food out of her mouth a couple of times when I thought she wasn't coping with it. Nothing serious thankfully.

    With DD2 I'm doing a combo of BLW and purees. I don't put the spoon in her mouth though, she likes to control it. I hand it to her, she puts it in her mouth (and everywhere else lol). I also give her pieces of very, very soft fruit and veg.

    I just kind of feel my way through it though, I'm sure there are probably ways you're meant to go about it.

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  4. #3
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    Also milk is still their main food source through this period, so they're not meant to be sustaining themselves on the food the manage to eat, it's more about exploring food and doesn't matter how much they get it.
    DD1 was never very messy, but I know it can get ridiculously messy so will see how we go with DD2...

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    I'm much the same.

    I always steam our veggies with an inch of them evaporating I'm sure. If we are having veggies, I don't like crunch (stir fries are the exception)
    I do a mix every meal: a finger food option and a mash/puree.

    So...breakfast: porrige/weetbix/yoghurt/scrambled egg with toast, omlette or fruit

    Lunch: dinner left overs and salad things like cucumber sticks, tomato wedge, cheese, clix cracker, roast chicken, omlette, capsicum, corn cob

    Dinner: whatever we have. Shepherds pie, lasagna, fried rice, butter chicken, roast, veggies, chips (in air frier), pasta, salad plate, steak, chops... and once he was a bit older I also offer a desert like a piece of fruit, yoghurt, or occasionally, a plain sweet biscuit like Marie / scotch finger etc

    It's messy....but it's learning.

    I start with things like cauli and broccoli florets, with a pumpkin mash. I quickly get them onto our food because its just easier
    He LOVES baked carrot sticks (it was interestingly a massive pregnancy craving I had. I'd easily down 6 baked carrots to myself then want more if given the chance)
    I try to sick with soft foods that initially mush easier, or hard foods they can suck but can't break up (cucumber. I cut about 10cm off, peel it, and slice it into quarters lengthways so he had a quarter circle stick) soft fruits like ripe plums, nectarines, peaches i give whole to suck on while i hold it because of the seed, or in pieces. banana, mango, soft pear.
    I avoid anything that could be a choking hazard, so raw carrot sticks (He's had a whole carrot), hard fruits like Apple, unripe pear, grapes, cherry tomatoes etc
    I also avoid bread as they ball it up on the roof of their mouth.

    You get the idea...I just watch carefully. They do usually learn to bring things forward themselves. My mum and partner always freak out saying they're choking

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    Mashie (27-01-2020)

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    We did combined with DD1 and will be starting the same this week with the twins. I’m not looking forward to the mess.

    I follow a few insta accounts. Dr Kayla is a good one - she has a paid subscription group but the free page is also awesome.

    I’m not sure the mess ever gets better.

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    I highly suggest reading the book as it gives a very logical reasoning as to why BLW is a natural pathway. Our children are learning constantly and want to explore, play and have control over their food. What’s more fun than holding, smelling and experimenting with chewing on all sorts of interesting new things. Purées not only takes the fun out of food but doesn’t allow babies to learn that all important gag reflex. Or to enjoy what food is! Made total sense to me and my 4 year old eats like and horse and tries everything!

    Here you go;

    Baby-led Weaning: Helping Your Baby to Love Good Food Gill Rapley

    *Caveat being that I had a normal weight child so didn’t have any pressure on food being a hugely important supplement before she was 12mths.

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  12. #7
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    We did BLW with DD as well and honestly it was so easy. I ate when she ate and i made a point of sitting at the table with her while we ate. It is a bit vague as it was a good 2 years ago now, but started off with steamed veggies, fruit etc. Once DD got the idea we just introduced everything. She was 7 months old at Christmas and loved sucking on roast beef strips, went to town on a prawn, chicken, ham etc. toast strips. Before long she was having what we ate. As a baby she was eating a mild green curry and loving it. She was such an amazing eater. Still loves her food now, but definitely has her favourites.

    I got the One Handed Cooks book and it was great. They have little blurbs on each section about how to introduce different foods and when to introduce them. My biggest fear was the choking too so knowing how and when to introduce “hard munchables” such as raw carrot was definitely helpful. When I get downstairs I’ll send you a couple of bits that I found helpful.

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  14. #8
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    We did BLW with ds and like @MLadyEm it was easiest for us. He "ate" what we ate and we all sat down together to eat. Some of his first foods were sticks of raw veggies, lightly streamed broccoli and avo or vegemite on toast. Lamb cutlets were a hit too. We started at 6 months but he wasn't really interested in food until 8 months. He only really started eating lots of the food offered at 16 months when he saw toddlers eating.

    If you do BLW try to learn the difference between gagging and choking. My ds was quite sensitive so would gag a lot but he never choked on anything. I should add he was predominately breastfed until 16 months and only stopped completely at 5 years when I needed to stop for health reasons. But I was happy to breastfeed that long...completely a mutual choice.

    Whatever you do, try to introduce as much variety as possible before 2 as even though ds is a good eater, we noticed he became reluctant to try new things after that age.
    Last edited by AdornedWithCats; 27-01-2020 at 09:47.

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    We did BLW with DD, who is 3 in March.

    She gagged a bit for the first few weeks, but she sorted herself out. Our friend who is a child health nurse told us that if they are red and loud when “choking”, leave them to it, but pale and silent, intervene. We never had to intervene with DD.

    She ate what we ate from 6 months. I will admit I’ve never been concerned by how much (or little) she has eaten - I just offer it and figure she will eat if she’s hungry 🤷🏻‍♀️

    Although she has become fussier in the last 6 months, she’s not fussy in the conventional toddler way. For example, she won’t eat a chicken nugget or a hot chip, but she will happily eat our ordinary family foods like lentils, curries, salads, soups, grilled fish, fresh prawns, all meat, and any vegetable except pumpkin. I know there are lots of factors, but I do think a lot of our “luck” with having such a healthy eater is the fact that she’s always eaten whole foods. I think a lot of food aversions are textural, so introducing them to a wide variety of normal food textures as babies is probably helpful

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    BLW all the way. Just remember 'Food is for fun, when under one'. Breastmilk or formula should be their main food source until 12 months, so don't worry about how little they eat before then.

    DD just ate with us. I made sure that food was of a size that she could pick up. There is a book which was great.

    Interestingly, DD is now 6 and still can't use a knife and fork properly. She will eat pretty much anything, but I obviously didn't do too well on transitioning her to cutlery.

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