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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirena89 View Post
    Can someone explain to me why are we importing food? Surely Australia can produce enough for all that live in Australia.
    I get things like coconut and rice fir eg., but I dont get why we import tomato sauces, pastas, cherries from america..
    Fresh produce eg Grapes, oranges and lemons imported from the US or asparagus ffrom South America makes my blood boil. As does produce packaged in plastic. Mostly seen with organic, probably to differentiate it from the non organic. I refuse to purchase due to the packaging.

    I find it hard to decide between food miles vs packaging vs organic.

    Eg I can buy small packets of dried McKenzies legumes - lentils, chickpeas etc that are often Australian grown OR I can go to a bulk supplies shop near me and buy packaging free organic legumes imported from Mongolia or some other far flung place.

    My gut instinct says to buy as locally grown as possible, but I don't have the data to back that up.
    Last edited by SSecret Squirrel; 28-06-2019 at 17:56.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to SSecret Squirrel For This Useful Post:

    atomicmama (02-07-2019),babyno1onboard (28-06-2019)

  3. #22
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    Oh and if we are getting onto the topic of food, eating less meat is a great move.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirena89 View Post
    Can someone explain to me why are we importing food? Surely Australia can produce enough for all that live in Australia.
    I get things like coconut and rice fir eg., but I dont get why we import tomato sauces, pastas, cherries from america..
    2 reasons - the main - It’s cheaper - unfortunately the majority of consumers won’t pay more for Australian produce (eg: Chinese garlic sold in Coles ect is $12 kg where Australian garlic is $26kg, woolies/Coles only sell mainly imported bacon (with only 20% Australian ingredients ) for $10kg whereas your local butcher sells 100% Australian bacon for $24 a kilo, same with Vietnamese prawns being $18kg or Aussie prawns $39 a kilo

    The other reason is it’s part of our trade agreements eg: China commits to buy a certain amount of our meat as long as we buy their frozen berries ect

    You can absolutely get just about any food (in season) grown here in Australia, you just have to pay more for it

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Elijahs Mum For This Useful Post:

    Sirena89 (28-06-2019)

  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSecret Squirrel View Post
    Fresh produce eg Grapes, oranges and lemons imported from the US or asparagus ffrom South America makes my blood boil. As does produce packaged in plastic. Mostly seen with organic, probably to differentiate it from the non organic. I refuse to purchase due to the packaging.

    I find it hard to decide between food miles vs packaging vs organic.

    Eg I can buy small packets of dried McKenzies legumes - lentils, chickpeas etc that are often Australian grown OR I can go to a bulk supplies shop near me and buy packaging free organic legumes imported from Mongolia or some other far flung place.

    My gut instinct says to buy as locally grown as possible, but I don't have the data to back that up.
    Buy from organic shops - they don’t use plastic like the supermarkets do!
    Go search for a great local Fruitshop, I buy some veggies and fruit from our organic shop when I can but my local Fruit shop is also awesome as they buy locally , in season , and the quality is great as they have that great relationship with the growers - I only buy grocery items (toilet paper ect) from the big supermarkets but have been buying my meat, fish, bread and fruit/veg from the same local specialty shops for over 20 years - to support local businesses but also as they are the experts on that chosen food group and I like to know where my food comes from!

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    2 reasons - the main - It’s cheaper - unfortunately the majority of consumers won’t pay more for Australian produce (eg: Chinese garlic sold in Coles ect is $12 kg where Australian garlic is $26kg, woolies/Coles only sell mainly imported bacon (with only 20% Australian ingredients ) for $10kg whereas your local butcher sells 100% Australian bacon for $24 a kilo, same with Vietnamese prawns being $18kg or Aussie prawns $39 a kilo

    The other reason is it’s part of our trade agreements eg: China commits to buy a certain amount of our meat as long as we buy their frozen berries ect

    You can absolutely get just about any food (in season) grown here in Australia, you just have to pay more for it

    I would always buy Australian over any other country. And would never ever buy anything from China.
    I think China would still import Australian produce, arent Australian formulas in demand there? I dont think even Chinese buy produce grown in China..

  8. #26
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    • Use your own keep-cups rather than disposables when you get a takeaway coffee or milkshake - need to work on this.
    • Take a reuseable water bottle when you're out and about - i don’t really take drinks with me when i go out.
    • Buy fruit and veggies that's not wrapped in plastic - pretty much already do.
    • Take your own reuseable product bags when you buy loose fruit and veg - i just don’t bag fruit and veg and just buy it
      loose then bag it into a reusable shopping bag at the register.
    • Take resuable non-plastic shopping bags to the supermarket - i use the reusable coles
      ones. surely that’s no different to using any other reusable bag?
    • Take a reusable bag with you when you go shopping for anything - don't take the plastic bag at checkout - always have 2 reusable bags (those little ones that fold and zip up into a tiny pouch) in my handbag for use whenever.
    • Ditch plastic straws - if you need straws, there are reuseable metal and bamboo options available (wouldn't recommend glass straws for kids...) - i don’t use straws. ds has a few plastic ones at home that are reusable. again, i don’t see the point of buying more
      stuff if i have a reusable (albeit plastic) option on hand. surely the point of the challenge is to reduce one’s footprint by consuming less.
    • Avoid single-use pouch foods - buy bulk products and put in your own reuseable pouches or containers - need to work on this.
    • Avoid plastic cling wrap - use lidded containers, beeswax wraps or other reusable alternatives - need to work on this but don’t see any real plastic food wrap alternatives.
      i guess i could use a plate as a food
      cover in the fridge instead?
    • Avoid plastic bin liners (or at least use biodegradable options) - don’t see how this is possible.
    • Take any soft-plastic wrappers (bread bags, chip packets, rice packets, etc) to your supermarket recycling - or avoid those products altogether, if you can - need to work on this.

    Feel free to add other challenge ideas![/QUOTE]

    we use disposable nappies at the moment but i have no intention of switching to cloth. ds has just toilet trained and is down to one nappy overnight. dd is only 2 months old and goes through a lot of nappies. when i’m changing her, i try and avoid using the plastic nappy bags where i can. it’s not
    much but better than nothing i suppose.

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by turquoisecoast View Post
    ... don’t see any real plastic food wrap alternatives.
    i guess i could use a plate as a food
    cover in the fridge instead?




    we use disposable nappies at the moment but i have no intention of switching to cloth. ds has just toilet trained and is down to one nappy overnight. dd is only 2 months old and goes through a lot of nappies. when i’m changing her, i try and avoid using the plastic nappy bags where i can. it’s not
    much but better than nothing i suppose.
    Getting DH off his glad wrap addiction is still a work in progress. He would use half a tomato then glad wrap the rest, he'll now use a small clear container (he needs to be able to see it to know it's there). Beeswax wraps seem to keep avocado and block cheese better than plastic wrap IMO.

    I use a plate or beeswax wrap as a food cover but you can buy stretch over or elastic round plate covers. We also have one of those microwave plate covers that I use if DH is going to reheat and eat later that night (has holes so no good for any longer). If you like your sandwich 'held together' you can use a beeswax wrap or sandwich wrap. I use these options when I have an excursion and don't want the bulk of containers (also have little fabric zip snack bags).

    I do still use cling wrap when meat is involved and a container won't work - eg. Wrapping the end of the cut Christmas ham log DH gets as a work gift every year. I also use it when we do home crafts like tie dye.

    I didn't use cloth with my 1st but with my 2nd got big stash of 2nd hand MCNs once he was about 3 months and past the newborn stage. I still needed disposables at night. I then resold them when they were done. They were in amazing condition when I bought them, one had a stain that wouldn't budge and one had a broken snap (out of 20).

    The impact of a lot of disposable alternatives increases the more they get reused.

    Eg. My shopper bags are nylon which is awful for the environment but I've been using the same bags for 10+ years. My mum has one that she's been using for 40 years. So they definitely 'win' despite the original manufacturing process/raw matertials. I really dislike the thicker plastic supermarket bags for this reason because 1. at 15c (my bags cost $10 each) perceived value is low and there is a high chance they'll be single use, 2. They clearly are not going to last more than 10 reuses and they cannot easily be washed is they have meat or watermelon juice drip through them.

  10. #28
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    Another plastic saver I do. I grab those plastic party tablecloths at the end of a party, wipe the food off then reuse them as craft table protectors/painting drop sheets.

  11. #29
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    I try to be environmentally aware. Our recycling is 3x what goes in the normal bin, and school recycled toothbrushes and pastes though a company that makes them into park benches. Leaving a healthy planet for my kids/grandkids/great grandkids is important to me, and the kids learn about it at school too which is good.
    • Use your own keep-cups rather than disposables when you get a takeaway coffee or milkshake. TICK
    • Take a reuseable water bottle when you're out and about. - TICK
    • Buy fruit and veggies that's not wrapped in plastic. - TICK
    • Take your own reuseable product bags when you buy loose fruit and veg. - I don’t do this, but use the paper bags provided for most things.
    • Take resuable non-plastic shopping bags to the supermarket - Well ahead of the curve on this, I’ve been doing it for 20+ years. I bought some when the first came out and have used them ever since. Always have bags in the car for unexpected shopping trips as well. Some of mine won’t be non-plastic, but I use them for years before they fall apart. And when I replace, I try to stay away from plastic mix and go hessian or similar.
    • Take a reusable bag with you when you go shopping for anything - don't take the plastic bag at checkout. - TICK
    • Ditch plastic straws - if you need straws, there are reuseable metal and bamboo options available (wouldn't recommend glass straws for kids...). - TICK
    • Avoid single-use pouch foods - buy bulk products and put in your own reuseable pouches or containers - TICK
    • Avoid plastic cling wrap - use lidded containers, beeswax wraps or other reusable alternatives - Guilty is this for DH’s lunches. He likes his wrap wrapped so it won’t fall apart. I should invest in beeswax ones. The kids have yumboxes, so have always been plastic wrap free for their lunches.
    • Avoid plastic bin liners (or at least use biodegradable options). - TICK
    • Take any soft-plastic wrappers (bread bags, chip packets, rice packets, etc) to your supermarket recycling - or avoid those products altogether, if you can. - need to do more of this too, though I’m not sure it’s available here. I know Coles do the plastic shopping bags, but I don’t shop there and so not sure if the do the others.


    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    Try to use less baking paper - I bought new non stick trays but certain things still stick badly.
    What’s wrong with baking paper? I haven’t heard that one before and we do a bit of baking here.

  12. #30
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    I like the idea of uniformity of bottles - within reason. There's no reason why all jam bottles, for example, couldn't be the same, with maybe some different sizes.

    My kids have been sorting through their rooms and we've got some soft toys that they don't want anymore. What do you do with those?? I know hospitals, etc, won't take them for hygiene reasons.

    Good ones to charity?
    Old/poor quality ones - could they go to H&M fabric recycling, do you think?


 

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