+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 57
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    21,938
    Thanks
    883
    Thanked
    2,176
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts

    Default Plastic Free July

    I've just taken my two youngest (both teenagers now) to see the 2040 movie by Damon Gameau. https://whatsyour2040.com/

    Pretty mind-blowing to see the technology and knowledge that is already thought-of, tested and available if only governments would have the **** to legislate for it and big-corporates weren't more interested retaining their power and profits.

    So I thought it would be great if bubhubbers could make just a small contribution to ensuring there's a planet for our kids.

    There is an official Plastic Free July Challenge over here: https://www.plasticfreejuly.org/

    Here are some of the things that we can do. I know it's tricky with small children, but even a small change is good.

    So here are some of the things they suggest. How many can you tick already? Could you try and tick more by the end of July?
    • Use your own keep-cups rather than disposables when you get a takeaway coffee or milkshake
    • Take a reuseable water bottle when you're out and about
    • Buy fruit and veggies that's not wrapped in plastic
    • Take your own reuseable product bags when you buy loose fruit and veg
    • Take resuable non-plastic shopping bags to the supermarket
    • Take a reusable bag with you when you go shopping for anything - don't take the plastic bag at checkout
    • Ditch plastic straws - if you need straws, there are reuseable metal and bamboo options available (wouldn't recommend glass straws for kids...)
    • Avoid single-use pouch foods - buy bulk products and put in your own reuseable pouches or containers
    • Avoid plastic cling wrap - use lidded containers, beeswax wraps or other reusable alternatives
    • Avoid plastic bin liners (or at least use biodegradable options)
    • Take any soft-plastic wrappers (bread bags, chip packets, rice packets, etc) to your supermarket recycling - or avoid those products altogether, if you can

    Feel free to add other challenge ideas!

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to BH-bubhub For This Useful Post:

    BH-KatiesMum (01-07-2019)

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    21,938
    Thanks
    883
    Thanked
    2,176
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    I'll start us off...


    • Use your own keep-cups rather than disposables when you get a takeaway coffee or milkshake - try to, but often forget to take it
    • Take a reuseable water bottle when you're out and about - as above
    • Buy fruit and veggies that's not wrapped in plastic - most of the time, but sometimes we buy the plastic bags of potatoes or something that's on special
    • Take your own reuseable product bags when you buy loose fruit and veg - tick
    • Take resuable non-plastic shopping bags to the supermarket - tick
    • Take a reusable bag with you when you go shopping for anything - don't take the plastic bag at checkout - tick
    • Ditch plastic straws - if you need straws, there are reuseable metal and bamboo options available (wouldn't recommend glass straws for kids...) - tick, as my kids are older now, we really don't have any need for straws
    • Avoid single-use pouch foods - buy bulk products and put in your own reuseable pouches or containers - tick
    • Avoid plastic cling wrap - use lidded containers, beeswax wraps or other reusable alternatives - tick
    • Avoid plastic bin liners (or at least use biodegradable options) - tick
    • Take any soft-plastic wrappers (bread bags, chip packets, rice packets, etc) to your supermarket recycling - or avoid those products altogether, if you can Tick - Still haven't weaned myself of chips and we buy rice, crackers and things like that that come in plastic packaging. We try to put that aside and take it back each week to the recycling bins at the supermarket. Everytime I go to a bulk buy place, the stuff always looks so expensive by comparision that I usually end up buying nothing. I don't need organic rice, for example, just the ordinary stuff, but all the bulk places seem to stock expensive only versions of everything.
    I'd love to reduce the volume of packaging that comes into our house, even if we can recycle much of it. Recycling still uses energy. I've tried a shampoo bar, but didn't like it. But we keep looking. We went to a Moo Goo refill event in Brisbane recently and DD2 got a massive refill of her favourite product in an old glass Passata jar.

    I'm giving myself a tentative 8 out of 11, but as I was typing that, I realise how much more we could do.

    OK, who can recommend some good bulk source places in Brisbane?

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to BH-bubhub For This Useful Post:

    BH-KatiesMum (01-07-2019),Sirena89 (28-06-2019)

  5. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    1,074
    Thanks
    6,293
    Thanked
    3,110
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I’m terrible with plastic and I know I need to get better.

    I’ve got some metal straws on the way. We ditched bottled water at home ages ago and I fill my bottle from our filter tap if we go out.

    I’d love to ditch plastic from DSS’s lunchbox, but he wouldn’t bring containers home - some days the lunchbox doesn’t even make it home it’s a yoghurt pouch and 1 sandwich bag, so not as bad as some.

    I’ve got a good stock of reusable containers for leftovers and my lunches/breakfasts for work.

    Have reusable bags all over the place, I am horrid at forgetting them though!!

    Next step is reusable produce bags. I buy loose produce, but put it in the bags. I at least take them back to the soft plastics recycling.

    I’m a 6/11 which isn’t too bad I guess. I should look at better bin liner options and kitty letter liner options. Don’t use cling wrap, use sandwich bags and containers. If I have to cover something I use foil.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Pcos30 For This Useful Post:

    BH-bubhub (28-06-2019)

  7. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    545
    Thanks
    385
    Thanked
    495
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Oh yay
    Very passionate household here.
    My kids are 8,6,4,2,and 6 months.
    We watched Our Planet, recently and cried over the 2nd episode with poor walruses falling of a cliff...so sad...
    We have been doing our hardest for a year now.

    Changes we made and which I believe are easily made by everyone if there was will
    1) cloth nappies and cloth wipes
    2) shopping at op shops first, and only buying new things when absolutely necessary
    3) keep cup or no coffee
    4) taking our own water bottles
    5) shopping plastic free fruit and veg, and not buying any wrapped ones
    6) bamboo toothbrushes, bamboo scrubby thing for dishes, bamboo ear thingies
    7)cloth menstrual pads for myself (still no period pp, but used easily for pp bleeding)
    8) bring own bags, if forgotten push trolley to car lol
    9) buying in bulk shops where we fill our own glass jars (nuts, peanut butter, popcorn, ...all pantry items, and also detergent, cleaners..) - seems like its more expensive, but it really isnt
    10) buying flour, oats and potatoes in huge,bulk brown paper bags
    11) buying milk at farmer market, in glass jars which are returned next week and they refill them (i thjnk we only bought plastic milk about 10 times in the past year)
    12) we have stainless steel straws and take them places, our kids hate plastic straws with a passion , they saw poor turtles
    13) cloth make up remover
    14) no presents for our kids for bdays nd xmas from family and friends. They still get presents from us which are thoughtfully organised, second hand item that they really want and will use
    15) recycling old clothes through H&M and soft plastic through redcycle as something always sneaks in
    16) no cling wrap, baking paper or al.foil
    17) when buying bread from bakers asking for a paper bag, avoiding plastic wrapped bread from shops
    18) making cleaners, air fresheners, deodorant, .. nut and oat milks, biscuits, cakes..from scratch
    19) not using disposable p,ates, cutlery for kids parties and a big no to balloons


    ...

    Thats all i can think of atm. No matter how hard we try something sneaks in
    Would love to have chickens and acompost bin, but as we love with in laws, not possible atm. Soon hopefully.

    Would love to share ideas. Great tread, thank you!!

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Sirena89 For This Useful Post:

    BH-bubhub (28-06-2019),gorgeousgeorge (27-06-2019)

  9. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    545
    Thanks
    385
    Thanked
    495
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Also, can I add, that bjodegradable plastics are still verybad fkr the environment.
    All biodegradable means is that it breaks down into smaller plastic and still takes who knows how long to fully break down - plastic breaking down is how we have problem of micro plastics in our waters and soil

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Sirena89 For This Useful Post:

    babyno1onboard (01-07-2019),BH-bubhub (28-06-2019)

  11. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    21,938
    Thanks
    883
    Thanked
    2,176
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    I've been trying to use paper bags for our rubbish, but do need to use plastic bags sometimes. DH says he's doing his bit for the environment by getting those big paper bags from Red Rooster that I can use for the bin!

    DDs and I have all got make-up remover cloths and haven't used any products for make-up removal for ages. Saves loads and it's much easier when travelling too.

    We've got a really small yard so there's not much ground to put compost in. We use this company in Brisbane (we're in north brisbane) https://goinggreenaustralia.com.au/ We fill a compost bin every 10 days or so and they come and collect it.

    Lots more we could do though in terms of packaging - even though that's labelled as recyclable.

  12. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    545
    Thanks
    385
    Thanked
    495
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    https://www.wwf.org.au/news/news/201...D%3D#gs.lxc0n3

    Here is an article about how much microplastics we ingest in a week. Scary..

    I havent used plastic bin liner in a year now. We use brown paperbags that we get with bread.
    This is a very good discussion. Hopemore people join soon

  13. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,747
    Thanks
    1,743
    Thanked
    2,678
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Sirena89 View Post
    Also, can I add, that bjodegradable plastics are still verybad fkr the environment.
    All biodegradable means is that it breaks down into smaller plastic and still takes who knows how long to fully break down - plastic breaking down is how we have problem of micro plastics in our waters and soil
    Please tell me this doesn't apply to cellulose based plastics (eg. I'm currently using sugar cane based bin liners)?

  14. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,747
    Thanks
    1,743
    Thanked
    2,678
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I'll play along. I know there's more that I can do, biggest factor is slowly converting DH off glad wrap and onto sandwich containers and beeswax wraps! Kids have been well trained and containers/pouches never get lost.

    Quote Originally Posted by BH-bubhub View Post
    Here are some of the things that we can do. I know it's tricky with small children, but even a small change is good.

    So here are some of the things they suggest. How many can you tick already? Could you try and tick more by the end of July?
    • Use your own keep-cups rather than disposables when you get a takeaway coffee or milkshake
      ---keep cup lives in my car (and my bag when I have conferences in the city)
    • Take a reuseable water bottle when you're out and about
      ---my 10+ year old Tupperware bottle is still going strong!
    • Buy fruit and veggies that's not wrapped in plastic
    • Take your own reuseable product bags when you buy loose fruit and veg
      -- I have mesh produce bags but buy spuds, carrots and specials in plastic. I also find food perishes much quicker in my crisper without plastic bags, or things like brocilli flower when sharing air with zucchini. So I continually reuse plastic bags to keep things fresh (country living = weekly shop, no green grocer, etc).

      ]Take resuable non-plastic shopping bags to the supermarket
      ---Envirosax still going strong after 10+ years.
    • Take a reusable bag with you when you go shopping for anything - don't take the plastic bag at checkout
      ---see above, always have 2 folded in my handbag for non-supermarket shopping.

    • Ditch plastic straws - if you need straws, there are reuseable metal and bamboo options available (wouldn't recommend glass straws for kids...)
      ---set of SS smoothie straws live in my handbag.
    • Avoid single-use pouch foods - buy bulk products and put in your own reuseable pouches or containers
      ---our lunch boxes are all nude, including yoghurt pouches (My Lil Pouches 7+ years and still going). Also TRY to bake snacks when possible.
    • Avoid plastic cling wrap - use lidded containers, beeswax wraps or other reusable alternatives
      ---beeswax wraps, containers.
    • Avoid plastic bin liners (or at least use biodegradable options)
      ---sugar cane liners. Use 1-2 per week. Use packaging plastic for small bathroom bin.
    • Take any soft-plastic wrappers (bread bags, chip packets, rice packets, etc) to your supermarket recycling - or avoid those products altogether, if you can
    ---our council does soft plastics recycling

    Feel free to add other challenge ideas!
    Areas to improve are more cooking snacks from scratch as they are very packaging heavy (never buy multi packs)
    Use the icy pole moulds I have more regularly.
    Try to use less baking paper - I bought new non stick trays but certain things still stick badly.
    Dry nights for DS. I keep thinking 'he'll be out of pull ups soon, so haven't invested in an alternative. I sold all his cloth 3+ years ago once day trained.
    I do buy supermarket meat on trays when I could take containers to the butcher. But our local butcher is so expensive by comparison. Eg. Chicken breast $17kg rather than $9 for supermarket bulk. We don't eat large amounts of meat though.
    I could make a bread bag and get bread from the bakery however we freeze our bread as our bread eating is very sporadic and unpredictable.

    The recent electricity bill thread confirmed that we're pretty good in that respect and even better now we have solar.

    My car runs 5l/100km as I couldn't afford a hybrid, pretty happy with that.

    I use a cup, though not on my heaviest days.

    I'm happy recycling is an option now but don't believe we should rely on it to 'fix' the problem. My recycling bin is always full every fortnight and we don't drink beer or soft drinks. It's mostly milk bottles, legume cans and cereal/cracker boxes.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Stretched For This Useful Post:

    Sirena89 (28-06-2019)

  16. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,747
    Thanks
    1,743
    Thanked
    2,678
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Also, a local mum runs a blog, Gippsland Unwrapped, which is amazing if you're looking for changes to make (I get the major guilts reading it as there is so much more I could be doing, but she does choose to not work to live that way). Her journey all started with doing plastic free July.

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to Stretched For This Useful Post:

    SSecret Squirrel (28-06-2019)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Woolworths banning free plastic bags - thoughts?
    By Mod-Degrassi in forum General Chat
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: 16-07-2017, 20:15
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 29-06-2012, 15:40
  3. Plastic drink bottles- chemical free need advice please.
    By Betty Boop in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 21-01-2010, 16:11
  4. BPA free plastic or glass?
    By Chunkydunks in forum Product Recommendations & Questions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 22-03-2009, 14:49
  5. Desperate for information on Lactose-free
    By ReneeEve in forum Food allergies & intolerances
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 31-08-2004, 14:15

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

FEATURED SUPPORTER
Baby Car Seats and Infant Car RestraintsBuying a baby car seat? Check out our 'go-to' links here!
FORUMS - chatting now ...