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    Default Giftedness in children

    Does anyone have a child who was diagnosed as gifted?

    What prompted you to get them diagnosed and do you think the diagnosis was worth it? Also, was their development asynchronous?

    Thanks.

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    Don’t know if it’s remotely helpful but I was diagnosed gifted as a child. Can only answer from the kid’s perspective. Or ask mum I guess. Was in around 1990 though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaKB View Post
    Don’t know if it’s remotely helpful but I was diagnosed gifted as a child. Can only answer from the kid’s perspective. Or ask mum I guess. Was in around 1990 though.
    Thank you lovely, that is definitely helpful. Did you find that the diagnosis helped you in any way or served more so as a hindrance (i.e. feeling pressure to preform)? I'm somewhat reluctant to seek an evaluation in case my hunch is in fact correct. At times though I wonder if I'm letting him down by not seeking one.

    Were you gifted across the board or more so in one area? Was your social, emotional and academic development in sync with one another or at different levels?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MissTwiggley View Post
    Does anyone have a child who was diagnosed as gifted?

    What prompted you to get them diagnosed and do you think the diagnosis was worth it? Also, was their development asynchronous?

    Thanks.
    I’m giving my opinion as a teacher - in short, yes, I’d get testing so that you (as the family) and school can provide the support that is needed. I did a short PD in this area and the main message I got was that giftedness doesn’t automatically mean talented. The talent needs to be purposefully developed....but this can’t occur effectively without knowing more about the individual and providing the right type of environment and experiences.

    Teaching gifted students can be really challenging but the more info a school has, the better. Below is some info from the Vic Ed dept. I’m in WA but found their blurb nice and clear


    - Giftedness is identifiable in very young children.
    - Early identification is essential for the long-term wellbeing of the gifted child.
    - Giftedness is present equally in boys and girls and children from all socio-economic and cultural backgrounds.
    - Giftedness is not rare – it is estimated 10–15 per cent of the population is gifted.
    - Gifted children can also have learning difficulties and disabilities.

    The particular areas or domains in which young gifted children will begin to develop talent will depend on both their natural abilities and environmental influences such as experiences they have, and support and encouragement they receive. It is not always possible to predict in which area or areas young gifted children may develop their potential into talent. (Vic.edu.au)

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    I can’t help with your question, but I’m interested in the answer as I’m wondering about DD.

    When I was growing up there was no diagnosis that I was aware of (or maybe it was because I lived regionally). I was selected to attend gifted and talented programs in primary school and finished in the top 10% of the state for HSC. It is possible therefore that I would have classified as gifted and talented. I am not sure if a diagnosis would have changed anything.

    The Insight program (on SBS) has a great show on gifted and talented a few months ago. It would be worth checking out, maybe see if it’s still available on catch up.

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    Both of my children are classes as gifted.
    My son is in grade 3 and my daughter is in prep this year.
    Feel free to ask me any questions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yogis Mumma View Post
    I’m giving my opinion as a teacher - in short, yes, I’d get testing so that you (as the family) and school can provide the support that is needed. I did a short PD in this area and the main message I got was that giftedness doesn’t automatically mean talented. The talent needs to be purposefully developed....but this can’t occur effectively without knowing more about the individual and providing the right type of environment and experiences.

    Teaching gifted students can be really challenging but the more info a school has, the better. Below is some info from the Vic Ed dept. I’m in WA but found their blurb nice and clear


    - Giftedness is identifiable in very young children.
    - Early identification is essential for the long-term wellbeing of the gifted child.
    - Giftedness is present equally in boys and girls and children from all socio-economic and cultural backgrounds.
    - Giftedness is not rare – it is estimated 10–15 per cent of the population is gifted.
    - Gifted children can also have learning difficulties and disabilities.

    The particular areas or domains in which young gifted children will begin to develop talent will depend on both their natural abilities and environmental influences such as experiences they have, and support and encouragement they receive. It is not always possible to predict in which area or areas young gifted children may develop their potential into talent. (Vic.edu.au)
    Very much appreciated - thanks! Reading the blurb, I can see that it's likely he would fall into the category. I was under the impression that development in all areas had to be consistent but now I know that to be untrue.

    You're right, giftedness does not necessarily equal talent in absence of a tailored program. What would schools do for the gifted child? He doesn't go to school yet. He's 4.5 years old.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-DJ Nette View Post
    I can’t help with your question, but I’m interested in the answer as I’m wondering about DD.

    When I was growing up there was no diagnosis that I was aware of (or maybe it was because I lived regionally). I was selected to attend gifted and talented programs in primary school and finished in the top 10% of the state for HSC. It is possible therefore that I would have classified as gifted and talented. I am not sure if a diagnosis would have changed anything.

    The Insight program (on SBS) has a great show on gifted and talented a few months ago. It would be worth checking out, maybe see if it’s still available on catch up.
    Thanks! I looked it up and am going to watch it now while everyone here continues to have a really lazy sleep in!

    How old is your DD? I'm not sure how else to word this, so apologies if it comes across rudely, but what about your DD has made you consider giftedness? DS has done a few things I wouldn't necessarily say are typical for his age but that in itself didn't seem enough. There are a lot of bright kids everywhere and I have wondered whether I have a huge case of mummy bias. His processing speed when learning something new and memory made me consider it a little more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lincolns mummy View Post
    Both of my children are classes as gifted.
    My son is in grade 3 and my daughter is in prep this year.
    Feel free to ask me any questions.
    Well done - that's wonderful! Do you feel that there was a significant change post-diagnosis? In reference to their academic opportunities, self-confidence etc or was it mostly unchanged?

    How did they find the testing process?

    Do they know of their diagnosis? Watching Child Genius put me off ever telling DS if it were to be true, because quite a few of the children were unashamedly referring to themselves as bright. I thought it was a little bit conceited and prefer a bit of humbleness in a person.

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    Offering input based on experience with DD but also subbing for advice on DS.

    Firstly, I just wanted to point out that 'gifted' includes its own sub-range, and not many gifted kids are profoundly gifted - writing sonnets at 3yo etc.

    My teacher perspective is similar to above but I feel that many schools/teachers struggle to meet the needs of gifted students (just due to the pull in so many directions, not for lack of trying), plus *some* of the growth mindset trend in education is dismissing the notion of giftedness altogether (don't get me started on this!). DH and I have always taken an active role in extending DD, knowing how hard it is for teachers to 100% meet the needs of every child. Much like a parent would take a child with a delay to speech, OT, etc and do exercises with them at home, as a school can only do so much. I'm big on inquiry learning, so rather than structured out of school activities, I follow her lead and there's always some sort of project on the go at home. I seriously contemplated pushing to have her moved up a year, but the girls in the year above her were quite troublesome so I decided it wouldn't be the best thing overall.

    DD is in grade 6 now and I never got her tested. Her last report placed her 18 months ahead in all areas of Maths and English. The secondary she'll be going to offers a SEAL program which she needs to do an entrance exam for. She's currently bored witless with a lot of what they've been doing at school (they have a 5/6 class, so the teacher will be needing to revise/introduce a lot of concepts she 'got' in grade 3 or 4). But she's such a sweet thing she'll never cause trouble due to boredom, she just comes home and nags me to do something interesting with her.

    We never got her tested as it didn't seem that it would make a difference. She attends a small school with no specific gifted program, she doesn't have any related issues that are problematic due to her giftedness and even with a diagnosis she'd still need to do the SEAL exam to get in to that program.

    DS has just started full time school and I'll be keeping a close eye on him. The sensitivities/overexcitability that can come with being gifted seem to have a bigger negative impact on his behaviour (plus how his behaviour is perceived). He struggled in the unstructured daycare setting, but so far is thriving in school. He's gone into a 0/1 class, which has turned out perfect for him and he's already being paired up with grade 1s for all the maths activities. I feel his potential giftedness is a bit more hidden due to his personality/behaviour, plus his speech sounds aren't perfect (had some speech therapy at 3yo). So while he has a complex vocab, it can be hard to understand due to sound errors.

    So I'll be watching DS because if his behaviour turns south (like it did in daycare when he was bored) at any stage a gifted label may ensure he gets the support he needs. I'm curious if this has been a big motivation for others to get testing done.

    I'd say the hardest thing for me as a parent is it can feel quite isolating. Gifted children are intense, they NEED a lot, just like any child with additional needs, but it's not really a socially acceptable thing to vent about how worn out you are by them as it just comes across as bragging.

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    MissTwiggley (06-04-2019)


 

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