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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Wise Enough View Post
    I don’t have boys, only girls aged 4 and 7. I keep nothing “age appropriate” as I see nothing inappropriate about a period. So they know mummy bleeds every month and it means there’s no baby in mummy’s tummy. If I had a boy I would explain the same thing.
    I’ve explained what the 3 different holes do. And I’ve shown how tampons expand in water.

    No mystery in this house.
    This is how it has been explained in my house. When they asked how the tampon works I told them it was a bit like a plug for my cervix. I don't see anything wrong with talking about a period. My husband asked me soo many questions about my period and watched me insert a tampon etc in the first couple of years we got together. He was fascinated by the whole process and said no one had ever really gone through it with him. I don't want my kids to be adults and not know basic human anatomy. I have teenagers...It's way easier to start the conversation young in my experience
    Last edited by Full House; 22-10-2018 at 16:53.

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  3. #22
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    My nephew: mumma can I hop in the bath with you?
    My sister: no hun mums got her period
    Nephew: ok

    Not an issue for him, he gets it.

    Meanwhile @SheWarrior that friend of your daughters sounds like a keeper!

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  5. #23
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    I think males not being educated enough in the female reproductive system is why we paid GST on hygiene products for so many years.

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  7. #24
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    Side note - Can I just ask, what if your child doesn’t ask? Like I have always been prepared to tell my DD honestly where babies come from and what a period is but the opportunity didn’t arise. I thought for sure when I was pregnant or gave birth she’d have questions but nope - she knew that when her brother was ready to be born my belly would start to hurt and that’s how I would know he was ready and then I’d go to hospital, but she never asked more than that. She’s now 5.5 and I’m one of the rare mums who gets privacy in the bathroom so she’s never seen a pad or tampon because she just doesn’t come in. Part of being respectful in our house is giving each other privacy in the bathroom; that actually started with her asking me to turn around in public toilet cubicles so she does the same for me. While she’s so young, should I just wait until she asks or proactively start the discussion?

  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR03 View Post
    Side note - Can I just ask, what if your child doesn’t ask? Like I have always been prepared to tell my DD honestly where babies come from and what a period is but the opportunity didn’t arise. I thought for sure when I was pregnant or gave birth she’d have questions but nope - she knew that when her brother was ready to be born my belly would start to hurt and that’s how I would know he was ready and then I’d go to hospital, but she never asked more than that. She’s now 5.5 and I’m one of the rare mums who gets privacy in the bathroom so she’s never seen a pad or tampon because she just doesn’t come in. Part of being respectful in our house is giving each other privacy in the bathroom; that actually started with her asking me to turn around in public toilet cubicles so she does the same for me. While she’s so young, should I just wait until she asks or proactively start the discussion?
    i’d wait for her to ask. maybe if there’s no interest by age 7-8 you could gently bring it up?

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR03 View Post
    Side note - Can I just ask, what if your child doesn’t ask? Like I have always been prepared to tell my DD honestly where babies come from and what a period is but the opportunity didn’t arise. I thought for sure when I was pregnant or gave birth she’d have questions but nope - she knew that when her brother was ready to be born my belly would start to hurt and that’s how I would know he was ready and then I’d go to hospital, but she never asked more than that. She’s now 5.5 and I’m one of the rare mums who gets privacy in the bathroom so she’s never seen a pad or tampon because she just doesn’t come in. Part of being respectful in our house is giving each other privacy in the bathroom; that actually started with her asking me to turn around in public toilet cubicles so she does the same for me. While she’s so young, should I just wait until she asks or proactively start the discussion?
    Sometimes I would just bring things up but My dd never really asked alot of questions until starting school. She is 9 now and i get a million so i got her Kaz Cook's book Girl Stuff for her to look at with me or on her own.

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR03 View Post
    Side note - Can I just ask, what if your child doesn’t ask? Like I have always been prepared to tell my DD honestly where babies come from and what a period is but the opportunity didn’t arise. I thought for sure when I was pregnant or gave birth she’d have questions but nope - she knew that when her brother was ready to be born my belly would start to hurt and that’s how I would know he was ready and then I’d go to hospital, but she never asked more than that. She’s now 5.5 and I’m one of the rare mums who gets privacy in the bathroom so she’s never seen a pad or tampon because she just doesn’t come in. Part of being respectful in our house is giving each other privacy in the bathroom; that actually started with her asking me to turn around in public toilet cubicles so she does the same for me. While she’s so young, should I just wait until she asks or proactively start the discussion?
    I just followed my children's lead and answered their questions honestly, giving an appropriate level of detail, but using correct names.

    Now your DD is at school, you may find that she is given misinformation and half truths from other kids at school. I think it would be a good idea to raise the topic before that starts happening. I would definitely start chatting to her in the next 12 months or so.

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  12. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR03 View Post
    Side note - Can I just ask, what if your child doesn’t ask? Like I have always been prepared to tell my DD honestly where babies come from and what a period is but the opportunity didn’t arise. I thought for sure when I was pregnant or gave birth she’d have questions but nope - she knew that when her brother was ready to be born my belly would start to hurt and that’s how I would know he was ready and then I’d go to hospital, but she never asked more than that. She’s now 5.5 and I’m one of the rare mums who gets privacy in the bathroom so she’s never seen a pad or tampon because she just doesn’t come in. Part of being respectful in our house is giving each other privacy in the bathroom; that actually started with her asking me to turn around in public toilet cubicles so she does the same for me. While she’s so young, should I just wait until she asks or proactively start the discussion?
    My ds has never really asked either.

    He was 4 when I had ds2, and all he was worried about was how was ds2 coming out. I had a csect with him, so showed him the scar and said when the baby gets big enough to come out mummy goes to hospital, the Dr gives me lots of medicine so I can't feel anything (even tickles!) And he cuts mummys belly, pulls the baby out and stitches me back up... I'm sore after but I'm ok, and I was ok with him so would be after ds2.
    He was happy with that, my mum thought it was too much info.
    He's never really asked where babies cone from and why I didn't have lots I just said mummys and daddies need to both talk about it before mum's belly grows another baby. He was happy with that.

    He's seen me change pads, I don't let him see tampons. 1, because he has a weak stomach, 2 I have a weak stomach and sometimes is too much blood for me and I get lightheaded. The pads he calls nappies, the first asked why I wore them when he was about 3 and I just said sometimes mummy needs them. That was it for then and he hasn't asked again. When he does I'll expand enough to answer his question honestly, but not go overboard. He's an over thinker and will dance around subjects for weeks....

  13. #29
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    DSS is 6 and he’s knows everything. His mum is very honest and we try to be as well. Thanks to my upbringing I get a bit weird talking about this stuff. But when he found out about periods from his Mum he then proceeded to tell us all about them in the matter of fact way kids have, and that was the end of the subject. My pads are kept out in the open in the toilet, as there’s no storage in there, and he just ignores them.

    We had the “where do babies come from” chat with him, and he declared that s*x sounds gross and he’s never going to have s*x .

    One night as I was tucking him into bed he said penis and then acted like he was going to get in to trouble. I told him that it’s as silly as him getting in trouble for saying arm, as they’re both body parts - but some people don’t like hearing the word, so it’s a “home” word only.

    My mum always made me feel ashamed about bodily stuff, and even now she doesn’t like talking about it. And I know it’s part of why I have so many hang ups now. I don’t want that for my kids.

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  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pcos30 View Post
    DSS is 6 and he’s knows everything. His mum is very honest and we try to be as well. Thanks to my upbringing I get a bit weird talking about this stuff. But when he found out about periods from his Mum he then proceeded to tell us all about them in the matter of fact way kids have, and that was the end of the subject. My pads are kept out in the open in the toilet, as there’s no storage in there, and he just ignores them.

    We had the “where do babies come from” chat with him, and he declared that s*x sounds gross and he’s never going to have s*x .

    One night as I was tucking him into bed he said penis and then acted like he was going to get in to trouble. I told him that it’s as silly as him getting in trouble for saying arm, as they’re both body parts - but some people don’t like hearing the word, so it’s a “home” word only.

    My mum always made me feel ashamed about bodily stuff, and even now she doesn’t like talking about it. And I know it’s part of why I have so many hang ups now. I don’t want that for my kids.
    I think this is my problem too. My mum never really talked to me about stuff, everything was very taboo.

    Even periods... she just said randomly from when I was about 9 that I might find blood in my knickers one day and when I do, to tell her.
    Of course, my first period came on a public holiday, camping in the middle of nowhere, and we had nothing. There was nothing anywhere close that was open to buy anything. We had to pack up early and go home so she could buy me stuff to use. In the meantime she tore and rolled a Terry towel nappy up and told me to put it in my undies. At the time I was mortified and humiliated. I cried the whole way home. (1.5hrs). Now, I understand the position she was in and think it was very creative lol

    She got me pads, said "put these in your knickers and remember to change them every couple of hours, put them into a brown paper bag and in the bin when you change. Congratulations. You're a woman now"

    I had no idea what it all meant. I was soooo traumatised by getting my period that I refused to go to school while i had it for the first 3 years, because I didn't want anyone to know. I wasn't in pain, it wasn't heavy, I just felt so gross, I just wanted to stay in bed until it left.
    Last edited by shadowangel0205; 22-10-2018 at 20:16.


 

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