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  1. #81
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    How is your day structured? Do you do separate things for each kid as they are all different age groups and at different stages of learning? Is there any routine in your day that is the same?
    Also at the end of their (un)schooling life do they do the hsc and get their results ( not even sure what that's called these days?) so if they did want to go to uni they have that mark so then gave the option?
    Sorry for all the questions I'm just really trying to understand how it works

  2. #82
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    Default long term friendships

    Quote Originally Posted by Cdro View Post
    I meant spending enough time with the same people that you build a deep and lasting friendship. I think the way this normally would work for homeschoolers is that you meet someone at karate or drama or some regular organised event, you click, and then you arrange to see each other more often? For me, this "clicking" will never happen, so I would be worried that DD wouldn't have any friends. At school, she sees the same kids every day, so I figure there is a better chance of building a friendship (not that it's working quite that way at the moment).
    My kids are developing long term friendships with kids in sports, their cousins, and other home ed kids that they regularly catch up with. We also form long term friendships with people who we occasionally catch up with due to distance.

  3. #83
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    Default WWYD? Trouble settling into big school

    Quote Originally Posted by Winter Is Coming View Post
    I have not called people sheep.
    I am not running down your choices.
    I have stated that we do what is best for our own families.

    You quoted me comparing the "working with children of different ages" in school to what my children have done this week during school hours.

    Do you not like discussing the differences between home ed and main******?
    This is one difference. It's not my fault that you are offended by the differences.
    No but the other PP has. You insinuate that children who are in the mains.tream system do not have these same experiences. What does it matter if it's during the week or the weekend? You make it sound like we are harming our children by sending them to school.

    And if you make statements that are offensive, then yes, it is your fault. Own it.
    Last edited by sniggle6; 07-05-2017 at 11:16.

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  5. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    My kids are 12, 10, 7 and 3. My 10 year old loves cake decorating and is into fashion so i could see her in a creative career. A cake maker, cook, fashion designer or interior designer. She also enjoys writing stories.
    Miss12 loves Anime. She loves drawing, writing, sports and fitness so a career in those fields.
    My 7 (soon to be 8) year old loves cars. Anything to do with cars. Also leggos, comic books, dinosaurs, beach combing, footy (my 12 year old love's footy too and has said she either wants to work or play afl or work with animals). He loves video games too and has mentioned being a game tester
    3 year old loves trains. He loves playing outside, climbing and jumping, eating, babies, animals..

    My kid's can have whatever career they want. Its for them to decide.

    Yes i definitely plan homeschooling (unschooling) for as long as they want. That includes high school. When they're older they can look into tafe or uni or working.

    We all volunteer at community meals and i volunteer in an op shop. My kids sometimes help out too.
    I wonder, what plans do you have to have in place (particularly for miss 12) for when their educational needs go beyond your ability to teach them? At some point, your children are going to need to learn a certain level of grammar, English, essay writing, mathematics, social studies etc. This is not because 'school' says they have to but because it's what they need to become contributing members of society. I'm not talking about senior studies but the basic levels of what is taught in early high school years. I mean, there's a reason we mandate children HAVE to be in schooling (whether home, alternative or traditional) until a certain point. I can see how a qualified teacher can meet those needs but I dont really understand how someone not qualified can. Do they do more independent learning/studying and your involvement lessens? And would you consider formal schooling again if say, one of your kids wanted to study theoretical mathematics? Objectively, you have to understand that at some point, the knowledge they need may exceed your own?

    Anyways, I ask this because I think in many ways, it's the root of the issues people have with home school. They dont understand how you can possibly meet your childs educational needs (certainly I think most of us realise their social needs can be met easily enough). Genuinely interested in how you specifically and the home school community in general address the above.

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  7. #85
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    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    I admire the patience home schooling parents must have (and time) but as educated as I feel I am there is no way in the world I could teach DS what he learns from the trained teachers at school, not just numeracy and literacy but art, music, language, numerous sports , the incursions the school organises which we couldn't the excursions etc (and that's just 1st class!)
    I'm lucky as he literally skips into school everyday and absolutely loves it , I could never offer him what his school does and yes he (and I) have made so many new friends!

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  9. #86
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    Default HSC, University, Structure.

    Quote Originally Posted by magicmashie View Post
    How is your day structured? Do you do separate things for each kid as they are all different age groups and at different stages of learning? Is there any routine in your day that is the same?
    Also at the end of their (un)schooling life do they do the hsc and get their results ( not even sure what that's called these days?) so if they did want to go to uni they have that mark so then gave the option?
    Sorry for all the questions I'm just really trying to understand how it works
    Great questions. It's lovely to see people looking into home ed on this thread despite the apparent bad attitude of one home educator.

    My three kids, 7, 5, and 2, each have their own container of schooly type books. Any schooly type books are at the right level.

    We have a weekly routine more than a daily routine. The routine is on a whiteboard and my son helps to update it.

    Only the breakfast routine seems to be the same everyday for us at the moment. That may change as the kids grow up. Some families are more structured.

    Most don't get HSC results or other state equivalents. One boy did do two years of distance education so he could get a VCE score and ended up with a prefect site a few years back.

    Kids that want to do tertiary education tend to just start doing that earlier. Eg, TAFE at age 15 it taking university units online from age 12.

    Others use a portfolio or an entrance exam. I guess some may also work for a while and start as a mature age student.

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  11. #87
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    You really need to research unschooling and how it works. You need to understand how children learn best and how learning is done best with their interests. As for maths, english etc unschooled children learn these things throughout ever day life. They learn what they need when its needed, rather than being forced. Some unschooling children like worksheets and tests. Its never forced though. Some unschooled children/familes have schedules for things like activities. Others go with the flow.
    Many unschooling teens get into uni or tafe too. Reslly look into it.

  12. #88
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    Default offence

    Quote Originally Posted by sniggle6 View Post
    No but the other PP has. You insinuate that children who are in the mains.tream system do not have these same experiences. What does it matter if it's during the week or the weekend? You make it sound like we are harming our children by sending them to school.

    And if you make statements that are offensive, then yes, it is your fault. Own it.
    Before I "own it" I will need you to quote me on an offensive statement.

    All I have done is to share with you some of the differences between school and home ed.

    I am aware that school kids do similar things in their free time.

    Would you prefer that I didn't discuss differences?

  13. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winter Is Coming View Post
    What is the purpose of sharing these photos?

    Were you unable to find photos of the children appearing passionate about their learning?

    The first photo (children of all ages working together) is a great example of the differences between home education and your school.
    The photo really just looked like the class sitting in a circle as normal, quietly, obediently, lacking passion, looking at the teacher (except instead of the teacher you have two older students pretending to be the teacher).

    This week my children have worked with children of a wide age range. But they were not sitting in a circle in class pretending that two older students were teachers.

    They were at a botanical garden, at the beach, hiking by the coast. They were finding a snake, catching lizards, looking for fish in a pond, climbing on a canon, rolling down a hill, learning to do the "bridge", and forming human pryamids.

    You say let's not put the blame on main****** education alone, and I agree. Although I have noticed many home educators reporting that the only change they needed to make was to remove their child from school and the self harming, depression, anxiety, etc significantly reduces.

    You say it's main******, so the vast majority of people do fit in.

    That's semantics.
    So are you suggesting the kids are "lacking in passion" isn't having a dig? That because the photo doesn't show the children "appearing to be passionate" isn't having a dig?

    My 6 year old is extremely passionate about school and learning. He loves it. But I highly doubt he will be exhibiting it every single minute of every single day. To suggest from a single photo that they have no passion and it's because they're stuck in a mains.tream classroom environment is pretty offensive.

    And don't tell me you didn't say those exact words. It's pretty clear what your thoughts are from the words you did use.

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  15. #90
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    Default knowledge needed exceeding parents knowledge

    Quote Originally Posted by zelda View Post
    I wonder, what plans do you have to have in place (particularly for miss 12) for when their educational needs go beyond your ability to teach them? At some point, your children are going to need to learn a certain level of grammar, English, essay writing, mathematics, social studies etc. This is not because 'school' says they have to but because it's what they need to become contributing members of society. I'm not talking about senior studies but the basic levels of what is taught in early high school years. I mean, there's a reason we mandate children HAVE to be in schooling (whether home, alternative or traditional) until a certain point. I can see how a qualified teacher can meet those needs but I dont really understand how someone not qualified can. Do they do more independent learning/studying and your involvement lessens? And would you consider formal schooling again if say, one of your kids wanted to study theoretical mathematics? Objectively, you have to understand that at some point, the knowledge they need may exceed your own?

    Anyways, I ask this because I think in many ways, it's the root of the issues people have with home school. They dont understand how you can possibly meet your childs educational needs (certainly I think most of us realise their social needs can be met easily enough). Genuinely interested in how you specifically and the home school community in general address the above.
    I guess the short (and cheeky answer) would be the question: if you didn't learn the school subjects well enough to teach them to your own kids, what makes you think that sending your kids to the same school system will yield a different result?

    Grammar: read good books.
    Maths: Kahn Academy, YouTube,
    Social studies: YouTube, holidays


 

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