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  1. #421
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    Quote Originally Posted by deedee8 View Post
    OP, the one big eye-opener I've had since my DS started school is that they expect a lot pretty much immediately. And if your child learns differently, or doesn't have the standard behaviour, they very quickly (too quickly in my mind) put them into a box and label it 'issues'. This is grossly wrong! I've seen children who are little psychopaths behind the scenes but angels in class and get constant rewards from teachers. But children who are super smart and kindhearted in general get labelled as problematic in class for being overly fidgety, misunderstood, not stimulated enough or in the right ways, etc.

    Your daughter may be a brilliant child who is not suiting the environment, that's all. A psych may help sure but I think it's unfair that she should need one as she may be perfectly awesome as she is, but the system expects something different from her.
    I'm not sure who "the system" is? Do you mean her teacher? The expectations aren't coming from the teacher, but from DD herself. The teacher hasn't labelled her or said she has issues. (And actually, the school's expectations are quite low. In Kindy, they're only expected to be able to count to 30 and read up to a level 8 reader.) Or do you mean that I shouldn't label her? It's just that I'm noticing things that don't sit right with me, like the lack of friends, and her telling me she isn't good enough.

    You're right - she is a perfectly awesome kid and the role of the psych is to help her understand her own unique brand of awesomeness, so that she can be more happy and confident. I get the sense that you think a psych would change her so that she fits in and she would lose some of he real identity in the process (did I understand that right?). But that isn't it - it's more about building her confidence so that she isn't beating herself up all the time.

    Having said that, I think you were making a broad point about accepting individual differences, which I wholeheartedly agree with. But I don't think it's a nameless, faceless "system" that accepts individuals. It's individual people who accept each other (or not).

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  3. #422
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    Default WWYD? Trouble settling into big school

    Quote Originally Posted by Winter Is Coming View Post
    I asked for a quote of someone saying you can teach something using ONLY youtube. You did not give me one. Because no one made that comment.


    A lot of people have been using a straw man argument, about ONLY youtube.

    You are arguing against an imaginary opponent.
    There was a comment early on in the conversation about learning dance using YouTube, even though this isn't a school subject, as I said earlier on as a parent of a child who has been attending dance classes for 10years, while it may seem very easy, there are most definitely things about dancing that can not be taught using YouTube.
    My take on it is that realistically youtube like google is not always a reliable resource. I would think it's important to have other resources. That's it, not saying its wrong to use, just that it can be unreliable.

    I can't speak for everyone but I really don't understand unschooling, because the things people have mentioned are the things I do with my kids at home all the time, but I have never witnessed a day of unschooling so I just may not be getting it because there has to be more to it.
    Last edited by sparklebug; 11-05-2017 at 03:16.

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  5. #423
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    How does unschooling work for the continuity of learning?
    One day they like this the next they like that and so on. I am not sure I understand how they learn more than the surface of something?

    Does unschooling tend to lead into more in depth learning as the child gets older, that they become more interested in a specific area?

    Should a child show interest in attending university, how does that work if they haven't completed schooling? Tafe with the move to uni is an option but I don't believe that is possible for all disciplines.

  6. #424
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparklebug View Post
    There was a comment early on in the conversation about learning dance using YouTube, even though this isn't a school subject, as I said earlier on as a parent of a child who has been attending dance classes for 10years, while it may seem very easy, there are most definitely things about dancing that can not be taught using YouTube.
    My take on it is that realistically youtube like google is not always a reliable resource. I would think it's important to have other resources. That's it, not saying its wrong to use, just that it can be unreliable.

    I can't speak for everyone but I really don't understand unschooling, because the things people have mentioned are the things I do with my kids at home all the time, but I have never witnessed a day of unschooling so I just may not be getting it because there has to be more to it.
    I really don't believe anyone said one can learn dancing using youtube.

    Even if they did, they don't speak for everyone.

    I have asked someone to provide a quote of that and they could not.

    There was an anecdote of someone from America saying her 8 year old was learning ABOUT dancing when watching youtube. I agreed with that and I think people misunderstood.

    I have recently been completely misunderstood by a friend on Facebook, so I realise it is very easy to misunderstand, even when I think the meaning is obvious.

    You may understand what we do when unschooling better than you think. Yes, you do the same thing. The difference may just be that unschoolers do it full time, rather than in their spare time.

    Maybe it is just the cumulative effect of learning freely that you are yet to grasp.

  7. #425
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    Quote Originally Posted by lauzie View Post
    How does unschooling work for the continuity of learning?
    One day they like this the next they like that and so on. I am not sure I understand how they learn more than the surface of something?

    Does unschooling tend to lead into more in depth learning as the child gets older, that they become more interested in a specific area?

    Should a child show interest in attending university, how does that work if they haven't completed schooling? Tafe with the move to uni is an option but I don't believe that is possible for all disciplines.
    Only addressing the uni comment.

    Yes you can do some university subjects while still attending school. 2 years ago we had a gifted child that did just one subject at uni and the rest at school. He was amazingly gifted in that one area. It was arranged by the school.

  8. #426
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveLivesHere View Post
    Only addressing the uni comment.

    Yes you can do some university subjects while still attending school. 2 years ago we had a gifted child that did just one subject at uni and the rest at school. He was amazingly gifted in that one area. It was arranged by the school.
    Sorry I may have misunderstood but are you referring to someone who is in main.****** school and also taking uni subjects?
    I am interested to understand how an unschooler gets into say medicine or law as an example without main.****** education should they choose that path.
    The path may still be available I am not sure but I suspect would be longer and potentially more study / schooling.

  9. #427
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    Quote Originally Posted by lauzie View Post
    Sorry I may have misunderstood but are you referring to someone who is in main.****** school and also taking uni subjects?
    I am interested to understand how an unschooler gets into say medicine or law as an example without main.****** education should they choose that path.
    The path may still be available I am not sure but I suspect would be longer and potentially more study / schooling.
    With a six month bridging course is one way. There are others.

    BTW I am not a unschooler. I just have kids that have recently started uni or are soon too. I believe that we as parents should be aware of Backdoors entry ways just incase life doesn't go the way we planned.
    Last edited by LoveLivesHere; 12-05-2017 at 11:04.

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  11. #428
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    Quote Originally Posted by lauzie View Post
    How does unschooling work for the continuity of learning?
    One day they like this the next they like that and so on. I am not sure I understand how they learn more than the surface of something?

    Does unschooling tend to lead into more in depth learning as the child gets older, that they become more interested in a specific area?

    Should a child show interest in attending university, how does that work if they haven't completed schooling? Tafe with the move to uni is an option but I don't believe that is possible for all disciplines.
    I think people tend to have special interests which they study in depth for a while. I agree that people specialise as they get older.

    There are a range of options for university entry. My favourite is taking university units from as young as 12. This gives valuable experience and leads to entry to courses with credit for units completed.

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  13. #429
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    Quote Originally Posted by lauzie View Post
    Sorry I may have misunderstood but are you referring to someone who is in main.****** school and also taking uni subjects?
    I am interested to understand how an unschooler gets into say medicine or law as an example without main.****** education should they choose that path.
    The path may still be available I am not sure but I suspect would be longer and potentially more study / schooling.
    Just as the school was able to arrange for a student to enrol in a university subject, so can a parent.

    Earlier we were discussing a nursing practitioner who was unschooled, and was considering doing his doctorate.

  14. #430
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    I'm not a home-schooler or unschooler.

    However, there are plenty of pathways to university that don't involve your high school marks. I have reinforced this to my kids so that they realise that your results in school don't mean that you can never get into university.

    I did year 12 and got a terrible TER (ATAR) I was not able to get into any university course. I went to TAFE and did a certificate 3. Fast forward a few years and I am one subject off finishing a psychology degree with a GPA of 6. I got into uni by doing a tertiary entrance program that went for 6 months. This guaranteed me a place in the degree of my choice with a couple of exceptions.

    Medicine you can gain entrance by sitting a GAMSAT exam and a interview. I do believe now that most medical degrees are post-grad anyway. As for law you can get into law post grad as well.

    I'm all for kids knowing that their high school grades don't mean their fate is sealed. Same way I am of the opinion that the older you are when you go to university the more likely you are to succeed as you are there because you really want to be, not because it is just next step in the ladder.

    I don't think homeschooling or unschooling would stop a child or young adult from gaining entry into university and to be honest I think the tertiary entrance programs set you up for uni better than school.

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