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  1. #371
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    And also you have until year 12 to get band 8 so it's not like they will kick you out of school

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    Quote Originally Posted by elijahs mum View Post
    but in year 9 they have to now to get their hsc? My nieces had never done it either but had to this year (year 9) as you have to get band 8 to get your hsc - the poor things were so anxious today
    I completely disagree with this approach!

    I'm so sorry your nieces are experiencing anxiety!

    Hopefully QLD does not follow suit.

    I did read that they have other chances to meet the benchmark, but putting this pressure on kids in year 9 and then those that fail to reach the benchmark carrying that with them through year 10, 11 and 12. What were they thinking?

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  4. #373
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    I've been reading along this whole thread, and have actually learnt so much about the difference between home schooling and unschooling, so thanks. Great read.

    I do have one concern about unschooling. It's been discussed at length if an unschooled child would be able to get into university in the sciences/ mathematics disciplines, for example. Say your child did get in, how do you think they would manage the transition into such a structured environment after doing what they want when they want all those years?

    A degree in these complex disciplines requires them to study to a schedule, pass exams on a certain date, submit assignments on a certain date etc. A university lecturer isn't going to say "do you feel like taking this exam today?"

    Don't you think you are setting them up for, at best, a very rough transition (at worst, failure) where mains.tream educated children would be accustomed to following a schedule and the exam process.

    I'm sure someone is going to say that these kids will be fine because they chose to study in this discipline, but I disagree. Sometimes interest in a topic isn't enough. I'm sure most people who study at a university level are interested in what they are studying , after all, they did select the course. That doesn't mean they always enjoy the work to achieve that end goal of their degree.

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  6. #374
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    Quote Originally Posted by PomPoms View Post
    I completely disagree with this approach!

    I'm so sorry your nieces are experiencing anxiety!

    Hopefully QLD does not follow suit.

    I did read that they have other chances to meet the benchmark, but putting this pressure on kids in year 9 and then those that fail to reach the benchmark carrying that with them through year 10, 11 and 12. What were they thinking?
    I agree , they are 14! They shouldn't have to worry about the HSC yet !

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  8. #375
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    Quote Originally Posted by shethewolf View Post
    I've been reading along this whole thread, and have actually learnt so much about the difference between home schooling and unschooling, so thanks. Great read.

    I do have one concern about unschooling. It's been discussed at length if an unschooled child would be able to get into university in the sciences/ mathematics disciplines, for example. Say your child did get in, how do you think they would manage the transition into such a structured environment after doing what they want when they want all those years?

    A degree in these complex disciplines requires them to study to a schedule, pass exams on a certain date, submit assignments on a certain date etc. A university lecturer isn't going to say "do you feel like taking this exam today?"

    Don't you think you are setting them up for, at best, a very rough transition (at worst, failure) where mains.tream educated children would be accustomed to following a schedule and the exam process.

    I'm sure someone is going to say that these kids will be fine because they chose to study in this discipline, but I disagree. Sometimes interest in a topic isn't enough. I'm sure most people who study at a university level are interested in what they are studying , after all, they did select the course. That doesn't mean they always enjoy the work to achieve that end goal of their degree.
    This is purely anecdote, but I think they would cope better if they are used to self managing their learning and know how to find information, rather than having it handed to them in the prescribed textbook on the topic.

    I went to a government secondary and needed to be quite self suffient in my studies. I worked part time, my parents couldn't run me around, teachers were overstretched (but did a lot extra for VCE students) and we were not well off. I would catch a tram on the weekends to a big public library to access books that our local one/school didn't have to complete assignments. I learnt to be resourceful to achieve my goals. Obviously this is well before the internet!!

    I had some friends who went to Hailebury (currently costs about 30k for year 7-8 from memory) and they had a lot more structure at school level than I did. Extra tute groups after school, private tutoring, special consideration on deadlines if they were representing their school in competitive sport, resources galore, it was all there for them!

    Both really struggled to adjust to uni. They were so used to someone (not a deadline, but a teacher/parent) prompting them what to do, how and by when. The concept of just an assessment rubric and a deadline, plus a bunch of lectures that no one cared if you went or not, was all too different.

    I found uni required so much more independent learner skills than high school.

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  10. #376
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    Quote Originally Posted by shethewolf View Post
    I've been reading along this whole thread, and have actually learnt so much about the difference between home schooling and unschooling, so thanks. Great read.

    I do have one concern about unschooling. It's been discussed at length if an unschooled child would be able to get into university in the sciences/ mathematics disciplines, for example. Say your child did get in, how do you think they would manage the transition into such a structured environment after doing what they want when they want all those years?

    A degree in these complex disciplines requires them to study to a schedule, pass exams on a certain date, submit assignments on a certain date etc. A university lecturer isn't going to say "do you feel like taking this exam today?"

    Don't you think you are setting them up for, at best, a very rough transition (at worst, failure) where mains.tream educated children would be accustomed to following a schedule and the exam process.

    I'm sure someone is going to say that these kids will be fine because they chose to study in this discipline, but I disagree. Sometimes interest in a topic isn't enough. I'm sure most people who study at a university level are interested in what they are studying , after all, they did select the course. That doesn't mean they always enjoy the work to achieve that end goal of their degree.
    Thanks for joining the conversation.

    My understanding is that home educated students tend to complete their degrees at a higher rate than their schooled counterparts.

    I went to school and handed assignments in within ten minutes of when they were due on a regular basis.

    Unschoolers certainly have the option of studying real university units prior to going to university full time, in fact, my feelings are that this is one of the more popular pathways into university. So many will be used to deadlines

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  12. #377
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    Default WWYD? Trouble settling into big school

    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    This is purely anecdote, but I think they would cope better if they are used to self managing their learning and know how to find information, rather than having it handed to them in the prescribed textbook on the topic.

    I went to a government secondary and needed to be quite self suffient in my studies. I worked part time, my parents couldn't run me around, teachers were overstretched (but did a lot extra for VCE students) and we were not well off. I would catch a tram on the weekends to a big public library to access books that our local one/school didn't have to complete assignments. I learnt to be resourceful to achieve my goals. Obviously this is well before the internet!!

    I had some friends who went to Hailebury (currently costs about 30k for year 7-8 from memory) and they had a lot more structure at school level than I did. Extra tute groups after school, private tutoring, special consideration on deadlines if they were representing their school in competitive sport, resources galore, it was all there for them!

    Both really struggled to adjust to uni. They were so used to someone (not a deadline, but a teacher/parent) prompting them what to do, how and by when. The concept of just an assessment rubric and a deadline, plus a bunch of lectures that no one cared if you went or not, was all too different.

    I found uni required so much more independent learner skills than high school.
    Study after study shows that public school students do better at uni than private school students.

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  14. #378
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    Quote Originally Posted by witherwings View Post
    @Cdro your daughter sounds a lot like my son, also 5yrs old and started school a few months ago.

    He has anxiety and is a perfectionist. We started taking him to a psychotherapist that specialises in children of his age, and she has helped us identify many of his issues and strategies to deal with them.

    One of the things she has been helping us with is being flexible and being ok with making mistakes. It's taken some weeks but our DS is finally ok with rubbing mistakes out instead of scrunching up the entire piece of paper and having a meltdown before starting over again.

    We read a book called "beautiful oops" which was about finding opportunities to turn mistakes into new and better things.

    We've also been drilling into him that being flexible will help him not get angry, anxious and in trouble.

    He also says some very disturbing things sometimes about dying or being overwhelmed with "everything happening to me" and being quite melancholy sometimes. I think this is part of his temperament and a symptom of his anxiety. I never think to myself "he is suicidal" or "he is depressed". I don't think he understands what he is really saying, he just doesn't know how else to express his feelings.

    I 100% think you should seek some professional help for your DD. it can only have positive outcomes. And talk to the teacher as much as possible, let him know what the issues are and have regular communication with him about her progress, if it's not too much of a burden on him.

    Regarding socialising with parents.. It might seem very daunting if you're an introvert, but im betting half the parents in the class are the same as you.. is there a "class parent" who corresponds with the other parents to communicate info from the teacher? We have one for our class (all the classes do) and we have had 2 social events out of school so far which have brought everyone closer together. One was a class park play date, which was so much fun for the kids, and the other was a dinner for parents, also very fun! Also my son plays soccer with a number of other boys in the class and other kindy classes in the school, so we see the parents regularly at the soccer games and training - maybe your daughter can join a local sport team? You could even use this topic as an ice breaker next time you do drop off.. try to find a parent of one of the girls in DD's class and ask if they know about any local sport teams that a lot of the kids from school are involved in..

    Then there's birthday parties - once you've gone to a few of them, you'll know most of the parents and it will be easier to be friendly/social with them at school too.

    Good luck, it's a tough gig, especially when you have a child like yours and mine!
    Quote Originally Posted by CazHazKidz View Post
    This thread has become quite interesting, Though totally off topic for helping the little girl in the OP settle into school

    OP I honestly thing the social side of things makes a HUGE difference to a childs happiness at school. As a few other posters mentioned before the homeschool debate took over, I would really try and find another student who could be a great friend to your little one and nurture that friendship. Maybe ask her teacher to take note of who might be a great match for her and to encourage that friendhship at school by pairing them up, and then see if you can get in contact with the parents to organise weekend or after school catch ups as well? This is what I would do. The loneliness of having no friends would be playing a huge part I would imagine. xox
    I saw the psych today (just me, and DD is going on Thursday). It sounds like she will be able to help DD, especially with the perfectionist anxiety. I also saw the teacher today. He only started 2 weeks ago, but when I mentioned DD's need to be perfect, he gave me a knowing smile and said he'd noticed that. He was incredibly supportive and he and the psych are also going to talk directly to work out some strategies together.

    Yes, we do have a class parent and she is in the process of arranging a class playdate, but it's the first one for the year, and it's meant to be this weekend but no one knows what's happening. So I think it will fall to me to organise more playdates. The psych mentioned this also. I have 2 potential friends already in mind. One is a lovely little girl with a similar temperament to DD. She is DD's reading partner. I see her mum every day standing alone, actively avoiding conversation and eye contact with everyone. I feel like I click with her already! The other is a quiet little boy. Much more challenging because I have no idea who his mum is. But I asked DD and she picked him, so I'll ask her again in a week or two, and if she still likes him I'll find a way to get in contact.

    A book is a good idea too - I'll google Beautiful Oops and see what else is out there as well. Thanks!

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    Default If you like.

    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    So, there's an episode on a show on Amazon Prime called 'Creative Galaxy' that explains how rainbows happen. My son enjoyed the episode so do I now claim he's learnt about physics and enjoys it? I do not need to send him to school then, can just keep finding him shows and videos?
    Yes, you can claim he has learnt about physics and enjoyed it. Because according to you, he did.

    Of course you don't need to send him to school. If he enjoys learning at home that's sweet.

    I don't personally do lots of shows and videos. We haven't even had tv connected since December, but you certainly could find a heap of great content.

    Perhaps you have found your son's learning style.

    But a word of warning: home education is not a walk in the park.

  17. #380
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    I also found in early primary that a play at the park after school was easier to arrange than a play date at home or anywhere else.

    Certainly that sounds posative for you

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