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  1. #321
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    I'm not sure about others but my just turned 5yr old is starting to read books because we exposed her to the written word, actually the whole world has done that. It is everywhere, and when my 5yr old showed an interest I helped her find ways to learn. There are trillions of books in the world, as I said words are everywhere, and let's not forget to mention how many online programs and educational apps there are out there these days. Unschooling is a very hands on way of raising and educating your children, if you love your kids and want them to have a future that is all bright and shiny you can't just sit back and do nothing, you have to be interested in them and what they want.

  2. #322
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    I am going to have to disagree with you. Many, many unschoolers go on to college and amazing careers. I am in an unschooling group where someone just posted that their 17yr old son has been accepting into Princeton. There are many avenues to get where you want, you just have to learn what those ways are. And if someone is determined enough they will learn what needs to be learnt to get where they want to be.

  3. #323
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    Actually I am a true unschooler and I ask my kids if they want to do educational things all the time. I think your understanding of what unschooling truly is may be very off centre. We have books all over our house, about 1000 different educational apps and computer programs, and any course online they wish to use. We don't force them, no, but we don't not have things for them to learn from either. My 16yr old has learnt more being at home for the last 8mths than she ever did at school, and that's with a child that was lost in the system who hates learning these days. Imagine what my younger three whom have never set foot in a classroom could achieve with this freedom!

  4. #324
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    Default Damn it haha

    I was replying to actual comments on this thread but for some reason my phone must have had a meltdown and now looks like I'm talking to myself. I hope those I replied to see it.

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  6. #325
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    Quote Originally Posted by rachy82 View Post
    Actually I am a true unschooler and I ask my kids if they want to do educational things all the time. I think your understanding of what unschooling truly is may be very off centre. We have books all over our house, about 1000 different educational apps and computer programs, and any course online they wish to use. We don't force them, no, but we don't not have things for them to learn from either. My 16yr old has learnt more being at home for the last 8mths than she ever did at school, and that's with a child that was lost in the system who hates learning these days. Imagine what my younger three whom have never set foot in a classroom could achieve with this freedom!
    How do you direct your kids towards educational apps and not just watching YouTube or playing mindless games all day, I'd it's child driven? Or are they not available to them? If I left my 11yo to his own devices he'd lay in bed all day watching Minecraft or fidget spinners or prank YouTube videos....if he had a choice between playing Minecraft or going to the museum or Scitech or anywhere really...He'd choose the screen...or be out riding his bike all day.

  7. #326
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaybaby View Post
    How do you direct your kids towards educational apps and not just watching YouTube or playing mindless games all day, I'd it's child driven? Or are they not available to them? If I left my 11yo to his own devices he'd lay in bed all day watching Minecraft or fidget spinners or prank YouTube videos....if he had a choice between playing Minecraft or going to the museum or Scitech or anywhere really...He'd choose the screen...or be out riding his bike all day.
    Well I will go a step further and say we are actually radical unschoolers, and one of the things that means is that we do not have screen restrictions anymore. So screens are no longer seen as a novelty, because they are available all the time they no longer want to binge on them and are way happier doing other things. My 9yr old is currently reading a book about quantum physics as he has recently shown a huge interest in this field, has always been interested in science though, my 16yr old is out working by choice, my 14yr old is on his PC and Xbox one because he has his own YouTube channel where he shares videos he has recorded of himself playing, which he has edited himself and all simply through having an interest he wanted to teach himself. He is also very interested in having a back up career because he has found out YouTube are going broke so it's not as easy to make money from here days so he will be going to TAFE to do a course the moment he turns 15. On from there we have my 5yr, 3yr and 15mth old children. My Bub has put herself down for a nap, my 5 and 3 year olds are out the back building a fort because we have no shade out the back and they wanted some asthey have been learning about harmful UV rays. All the screens are off, by choice not by force. It's amazing what a child is capable of it given trust.

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  9. #327
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    Default WWYD? Trouble settling into big school

    Quote Originally Posted by rachy82 View Post
    I am going to have to disagree with you. Many, many unschoolers go on to college and amazing careers. I am in an unschooling group where someone just posted that their 17yr old son has been accepting into Princeton. There are many avenues to get where you want, you just have to learn what those ways are. And if someone is determined enough they will learn what needs to be learnt to get where they want to be.
    There may be a couple of anecdotal kids going on to "Princeton", getting great jobs etc. I would suggest they are the exception to the rule. Do you have any idea how hard it is out there to get a job? A lot of employers won't even look at you unless you have a degree. Doesn't always necessarily have to be in the field but it demonstrates that they can achieve and cope with a high level of learning. Sure, your kids might be smarter than everyone else's put together but with a resume that reads "mum taught us at home... when we felt like it" up against someone that has tangible results, your kids are going to stand a chance imo.

    It's just the way it is...

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  11. #328
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    I

    I do think that you are underestimating the skill you have in being able to identify and run with 'teachable moments'. Being able to spot these, and then having the general knowledge base to support learning in the moment, is a valuable asset. It is not necessarily a skill that comes naturally, nor does the breadth of general knowledge that you've just demonstrated in this post.
    Totally. Those teachable moments are what I was referring to earlier. You use the teaching skills without even thinking about it. How to look at part whole part. The subconscious scaffolding.

    With respect, of course this is why Winter's son is doing well (not to say he's not bright, I'm sure he is!). But he's a teacher! And it really proves everything I'm saying. The reason Winter's thoughts over education and in particular the 'how' of home schooling is so well thought out is BECAUSE he's a teacher. I've found this thread so interesting bc there is some 'meat' to his thoughts, even if I disagree. But the bulk of unschoolers just kind of almost like a caricature (I genuinely don't mean that disrespectfully). Like they are just chanting well used sayings but really have NFI about it.

    Winter's child is clearly going to do just fine, and having ASD is probably going to flourish at home with him and a wife that is also pretty switched on. but what about the other kids that just sleep until lunch time and wander around doing nothing 'bc they want to'.?

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  13. #329
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    For those who keep saying things like, "only teachers know the answer to every single question a child asks the moment they ask it, and that is the only teachable moment". Are you serious? Do teachers really learn the answers to everything during their 4 year degree? Or do they learn how to seize that moment and harness the information from others sources, i.e. textbooks or perhaps even the internet. Any willing, informed parent with brains & skills can do that. Any engaged homeschooling parent can and will plan tomorrow's lesson/information/discussions and be ready to know as much as they can possibly find out, from the same resources that public school teachers use.This is not strictly the domain of those with a degree, and it's arrogant to think that it is.

    Yesterday during nature study/science, we went outdoors to study the Scarlet Robins whom are so active on our bush block at present. We discussed why they appear so present during the colder months, spotted both a male & female and searched around for a nest, while discussing what they use to build them. We went indoors and drew pictures of them. It was awesome. All that information came from online the night prior, and the idea for it from a pre-purchased curriculum. Of course, this was after an hour of maths and phonics, and before our 2 hour social visit at the local home school gymnastics class. We listened to our Spanish teaching CD in the car on the way there & back.
    While I'm one of the ones who has said I wouldn't feel adequate teaching my children, it's definitely not because "only teachers know the answer to every single question a child asks the moment they ask it", but do I need to take a minute to look up how to work out my 13yrs maths homework, yep regularly, it's not something I use regularly, I don't remember most of it.
    While I'm sure homeschooling parents would be prepared with lesson plans, I think its more unschooling that everyone is curious about because from what I gather this is not something they would do.
    Many of the things you mention we do at home, just because we send out children to main****** schools does not mean we don't do any 'teaching' at home. We expand on lots of things the kids are interested in, but I personally can not confidently provide a full curriculum, I'm sure there are other mums who can and that's great.
    DD and I also learn French the same way you mentioned you do Spanish, but I don't think it's enough to learn the language, because we are not learning anything about grammar, or even spelling (not saying your resources are the same you may be covering a much wider area) so for us it's more because DD showed interest as well as preparing for a holiday.

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  15. #330
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    Quote Originally Posted by rachy82 View Post
    Actually I am a true unschooler and I ask my kids if they want to do educational things all the time. I think your understanding of what unschooling truly is may be very off centre. We have books all over our house, about 1000 different educational apps and computer programs, and any course online they wish to use. We don't force them, no, but we don't not have things for them to learn from either. My 16yr old has learnt more being at home for the last 8mths than she ever did at school, and that's with a child that was lost in the system who hates learning these days. Imagine what my younger three whom have never set foot in a classroom could achieve with this freedom!
    On the contrary your younger 3 could possibly flourish in schools, your setting the tone for them because of the experience of the older child, but as your not sending them you won't know. Just as I won't know what my kids would get out of unschooling. I don't believe that avoiding school is a precedent in achieving more.
    Quote Originally Posted by rachy82 View Post
    Unschooling is a very hands on way of raising and educating your children, if you love your kids and want them to have a future that is all bright and shiny you can't just sit back and do nothing, you have to be interested in them and what they want.
    I think this is what it keeps coming back to pp's keep asking what happens in unschooling, but the answers are very vague, mostly.
    We all get its hands on, but being a mum is hands on, my kids at school but I wouldn't say I'm not hands on. I think we all love our kids and want a bright future for them, main****** school does not mean we are not interested in their wants, these are the things that get people riled up, because we're talking education it has nothing to do with 'if you love your child'

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