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  1. #211
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    Default support class

    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Degrassi View Post
    I know this question wasn't directed to me, but I have an ASD child who started primary school this year and I can tell you how our school caters to him.

    He attends a mainstr.eam public school and is in a support class. There are only 8 students in his class - one teacher and one aide. They have a top quality sensory playground and a huge trampoline for sensory breaks. They also have a huge variety of other equipment to assist the children with their needs. Children are very well supervised at all times whilst in the playground. The children's therapists are also welcome to attend and do therapy sessions at the school (my DS's OT and Speechie regularly visit). The children follow the curriculum, but it is tailored to their individual skill levels.

    My DS has far exceeded our expectations when it comes to settling into school. He is absolutely thriving on the routine and structure that formal education offers. We were quite concerned on how he would transition, as even last year he was having some struggles at preschool with challenging behaviours. We haven't had a single issue since he started primary school - his teacher cannot speak highly enough of his achievements, and due to this we imagine we'll soon be approached about transitioning him to a mains.tream class environment.

    We are very fortunate to be in the position to have a school that is a perfect fit for him - I know for a fact there are many ASD kids who simply cannot fit into mainst.ream education for a variety of reasons.
    Wow! That sounds amazing for kids that benefit from that.

    I have taught in 22 schools and there is nothing like that around here, other than the special schools themselves, which have the very same set up. I loved working with occupational and speech therapists there.
    To be eligible to enrol the child must have an IQ of less than 70.

    I am guessing that is not a requirement at your child's school?

  2. #212
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    Default conflict resolution. Home bubble myth

    Quote Originally Posted by twinklify View Post
    I probably have no business being in here. Not a teacher and my eldest is just in kindy.

    But I have a question for those who unschool or homeschool particularly for the reasons of ASD.

    How do you envision your child coping when they get older in the 'real world'.

    They will need conflict resolution. They will need to do things they feel uncomfortable with and do not like. They will need to deal with people they do not like.

    I understand that for children with ASD the world is ridiculously hard to deal with and live in. But should we not at an early age ensure they have the tools to thrive outside of the home bubble?

    I do know someone with 3 ASD kids. One of whom finds school and the world in general hard to deal with. But his parents, teachers and school give them all the tools they need to function in school and the world.

    OP - I think getting a psych to address the anxiety would be a good first step. Also have a good chat with the teacher/school.
    Great questions!

    These really demonstrate the myths surrounding home education.

    There is no home bubble. Home educated children get more time to explore the wonderful locations and situations than their schooled counterparts. They miss out on one social situation, but more than make up for it in other situations.

    Groups are forever finding new locations, businesses, etc for our children to visit.

    Conflict?
    The only way to avoid conflict with a child with asd is to give them what they want and avoid contact with family members, friends, and situations with rules and expectations for behaviour.

    As the home bubble is a myth, so is the lack of conflict.

    If only that one was true!

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  4. #213
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winter Is Coming View Post
    To be eligible to enrol the child must have an IQ of less than 70.

    I am guessing that is not a requirement at your child's school?
    I'm not sure IQ factors into it to be honest. My DS has moderate ASD and prior starting school he was linked in to early intervention classes run by the department of education, so there was plenty of background information before we applied for a support class placement. He underwent some standardised testing prior to his enrolment, but like most kids on the spectrum he wasn't able to complete the examination (he was too distracted to engage), so he would have scored quite poorly on that.

    In the area I live, there are a number of mains.tream schools that cater to children with additional needs by having support classes (even ASD specific classes), however it is up to a district panel to decide which children need those placements.

    It is already quite clear that DS won't be there long term, but it's been a great way to get the ball rolling on his education.

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  6. #214
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    Default WWYD? Trouble settling into big school

    Quote Originally Posted by Winter Is Coming View Post
    Wow! That sounds amazing for kids that benefit from that.

    I have taught in 22 schools and there is nothing like that around here, other than the special schools themselves, which have the very same set up. I loved working with occupational and speech therapists there.
    To be eligible to enrol the child must have an IQ of less than 70.

    I am guessing that is not a requirement at your child's school?
    In nsw there are schools specifically for asd students.

    And no I wasn't the one "outraged" by your suggestion the child might be asd.
    Last edited by BigRedV; 08-05-2017 at 10:17.

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  8. #215
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    Default schools for ASD

    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    In nsw there are schools specifically for asd students.

    And no I wasn't the one "outraged" by your suggestion the child might be asd.
    That's awesome. I have signed a petition to have ASD schools in Victoria.

    You are right, sorry. That was Dilerium.

  9. #216
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    Quote Originally Posted by twinklify View Post
    I probably have no business being in here. Not a teacher and my eldest is just in kindy.

    But I have a question for those who unschool or homeschool particularly for the reasons of ASD.

    How do you envision your child coping when they get older in the 'real world'.

    They will need conflict resolution. They will need to do things they feel uncomfortable with and do not like. They will need to deal with people they do not like.

    I understand that for children with ASD the world is ridiculously hard to deal with and live in. But should we not at an early age ensure they have the tools to thrive outside of the home bubble?

    I do know someone with 3 ASD kids. One of whom finds school and the world in general hard to deal with. But his parents, teachers and school give them all the tools they need to function in school and the world.

    OP - I think getting a psych to address the anxiety would be a good first step. Also have a good chat with the teacher/school.
    I hope you don't mind me responding to this even though I don't homeschool or unschool. I do however have a DD with ASD and I have spoken to many parents of children with ASD who homeschool for various reasons and speak about homeschooling as being extremely positive for their children. My daughter is in Grade 1 and for the most part copes well being in a mains.tream school with support. I don't envision homeschooling her in the near future, but it isn't something I've ruled out (on a temporary or permanent basis)if the need arises.

    From listening to those with children on the spectrum who do homeschool (and I hope they don't mind me generalising and speaking on this topic), some children with ASD are simply not able to cope well in the school setting for various reasons - generally sensory issues, mental health issues, bullying, issues with finding the 'right' school, etc. These kids are in survival mode, and no-one is able to learn new information or skills when there is this much stress/overload in their system (regardless of whether they are neurotypical or not). However, just because these kids can't cope at the moment in this situation, doesn't mean that they won't continue to grow and develop over time. Coping skills improve (both naturally over time and with therapy, etc), sensory needs change, etc. and the things you've listed that they need as an adult may come at their own pace. Throwing them into a situation that increases stress exponentially and means that they are unable to cope is not a way to teach new skills just because they will need them in later life. From my perspective, I think it's important to acknowledge and recognise that mains/tream schooling may not suit all kids and may not be beneficial for them (at that point in time at least).

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  11. #217
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    In nsw there are schools specifically for asd students.

    And no I wasn't the one "outraged" by your suggestion the child might be asd.
    While these schools exist, (in Victoria at least, and elsewhere from what I've heard) they are quite rare and can be very hard to get in to, particularly for 'high functioning' (I hate that term) children on the spectrum.

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  13. #218
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winter Is Coming View Post
    Great questions!

    These really demonstrate the myths surrounding home education.

    There is no home bubble. Home educated children get more time to explore the wonderful locations and situations than their schooled counterparts. They miss out on one social situation, but more than make up for it in other situations.

    Groups are forever finding new locations, businesses, etc for our children to visit.

    Conflict?
    The only way to avoid conflict with a child with asd is to give them what they want and avoid contact with family members, friends, and situations with rules and expectations for behaviour.

    As the home bubble is a myth, so is the lack of conflict.

    If only that one was true!
    Yes and school (sitting in a classroom etc) is far from the real world.

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  15. #219
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    Yes and school (sitting in a classroom etc) is far from the real world.
    Really? How do you figure that? When I go to work I am expected to be on time, not leave before my shift finishes, and complete my set work....at school my kids need to be there at a certain time, stay until the end of the day, and are expected to complete tasks throughout the day. They don't get to choose whether they wake up at 8am or sleep until 11am because their day can start whenever they feel like it, nor can I. There are days I'd rather be at the beach than at work, but I don't get to get ring work and tell them that my personal interests isn't in line with work stuff today so I've decided to take the day off and will be back in the next time I feel like it. Do you honestly believe that unschooling is more in line with the real world than main s.tream schooling? How?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    Yes and school (sitting in a classroom etc) is far from the real world.
    You said on another thread that you and your kids get up anywhere from 8-11am. That is not the real world. Most people are expected to be at work at the same time each day, and there are very few jobs that go with the flow like your unschooling.

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