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  1. #11
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    TheGooch is offline Winner 2014 - Newbie of the Year
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    Oh because you are a teacher so you must know everything, right? Its funny how many teachers are choosing to homeschool their own children because they see for themselves how much damage schools can do. Home education is on the rise here too.

    Yes the op's daughter needs help but school is not doing that. Read my words the system is flawed. Do your research.
    Unnecessarily rude. I've not seen one teacher on this forum ever post that they know everything. In fact, most of the teachers that post make suggestions based on years of experience. But they're just that, suggestions. I've also seen plenty of teachers on here posting for advice because they know they don't know everything.
    Just because you choose to unschool doesn't make it a valid option for everyone.
    And IMO a - school is damaging. She's struggling. Get her out of there - approach, doesn't assist the Op to help her daughter work through whatever the issue is. It's reactionary at best.


    On topic, Op I think a psychologist to help find out what's going on for your daughter is a good first step. There may be any number of things going on for her. It may be a phase. It may be something more serious.
    Also perhaps a meeting with the teacher one on one with you to talk about what your daughter is expressing might also help.
    Good luck and best wishes for your daughter that she finds a level of balance and comfort, in whatever educational approach you choose to take.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    Schools are damaging to kids. .
    How so?

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    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    How so?
    Do your research.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beljane View Post
    Actually I think homeschooling is a very real option even if it's through Distance Education. The things the OP has mentioned can have very real life long impact and I think the suggestion is helpful. Those who dismiss homeschooling usually don't know what it's REALLY about, only the stereotypes.

    I homeschool my kids (mum of 5). They are thriving academically, mentally and socially. It's actually very surprising how many Teachers I have meet over the last 6 months who are homeschooling their own kids as they realise the system is very broken.
    Exactly. Well said.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    Do your research.
    Thanks for the enlightening response. You're the one who believes that and I simply asked you how you believed it was damaging. Sorry, I thought you would be willing and able to explain such a broad and controversial comment as to why you feel a blanket statement that school is damaging to children true. Obviously I was wrong.

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    I'd definitely look into a child psychologist asap, it definitely does sound concerning but I also wonder if she actually understands what she has said.
    My DD used to be similar, she's still very good at keeping it together while out then falls apart at home, but its way better then it was, (she's now 13) my dd is also very bright but really needs to be pushed, and still tends to back off when she feels she isn't perfect. Depending on the teacher she reacted differently to being "pushed" so I would as well as seeing a child psychologist, definitely speak to her teacher, and together come up with strategies. I have generally found teachers to be very helpful, and willing to try whatever strategies we were wanting to try.
    My DD is now wonderful at making friends, although it's taken a long time to get here, we used to "practice" how to talk to "friends", and she would get "homework" for kinder like she would have to approach "friend x" and say hi then suggest something they could do together, the night before we would go through the different scenarios and how to react to them. As well as a lot of positive reinforcement.
    It was time consuming and draining, but it's now very much a distant memory.
    It's a terrible place to be in as a parent as well, you feel so helpless but once you have a plan/strategy in place you'll see there is a light at the end of the tunnel!

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    Default WWYD? Trouble settling into big school

    Quote Originally Posted by Beljane View Post
    Actually I think homeschooling is a very real option even if it's through Distance Education. The things the OP has mentioned can have very real life long impact and I think the suggestion is helpful. Those who dismiss homeschooling usually don't know what it's REALLY about, only the stereotypes.

    I homeschool my kids (mum of 5). They are thriving academically, mentally and socially. It's actually very surprising how many Teachers I have meet over the last 6 months who are homeschooling their own kids as they realise the system is very broken.
    I don't think it's helpful by a pp to claim that schools are damaging children. In my experience, vast majority of children who are homeschooled have some sort of underlying issue and the school (teacher) hasn't dealt with it properly or the child isn't receiving the therapies or getting treatment they need outside of school due to cost or whatever to help them. I'm a primary school teacher myself and I do understand that some children would suit being homeschooled, but I don't think it's right to pull children who need help with their conditions (anxiety, delays, etc) out of school and not get any external/professional help/therapy and hope it will go away.
    Last edited by BigRedV; 06-05-2017 at 06:08.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    Do your research.
    Sorry, i literally laughed out loud at this.

    Yep, point proven.

    And what @HollyGolightly81 said ☺

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I don't think it's helpful by a pp to claim that schools are damaging children. In my experience, vast majority of children who are homeschooled have some sort of underlying issue and the school (teacher) hasn't dealt with it properly or the child isn't receiving the therapies or getting treatment they need outside of school due to cost or whatever to help them. I'm a primary school teacher myself and I do understand that some children would suit being homeschooled, but I don't think it's right to pull children who need help with their conditions (anxiety, delays, etc) out of school and not get any external/professional help/therapy and hope it will go away.
    The System certainly is damaging some children, especially those who don't fit in a neat little box. As far as pulling a child out without issues being delt with..... I think that may have been the case in the past but not so now. I am very active in the homeschooling community and a lot of them a normal families like mine with no issues or issues that a being dealt with on many fronts. Their reasons for homeschooling are greatly varied. I have no issues with Traditional schooling and eventually my kids will end up back there but when it comes to situations like the OP's, swift action is needed.

    Mental illness is rapidly growing in society and we can't keep doing things the way they have always been done. Teachers have such a tough job and there is very little training in the scheme of things surrounding these issues (I am currently doing my Bachelor of Education so only too aware of this). It would be so heartbreaking as a parent to see your child going through this and knowing all your options certainly helps. Every parent just wants what is best for their child.

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    Default Teachers home educate

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippa View Post
    Which part of my post did I profess that I know everything? I must know the wrong teachers because I don't know any teachers who choose to homeschool. I simply said that homeschooling is not an option for most people which is true. The school has only recently been alerted to the issues so it's a bit of a stretch to say the school is doing nothing. Yes the system is flawed but us teachers who have to work in these horrible schools do our absolute best not to damage children.
    Of the six home educating families I have caught up with this week, three have one parent who is a teacher. Including my family, that makes the majority teacher-families. It's just an anecdote but yes, you probably don't know the right teachers.

    We agree that the system is flawed and it's not the fault of teachers.

    The system is not designed for maximum learning, nor for the well being of children.

    Most kids cope ok. Some don't.

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