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  1. #111
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    Default differential calculus

    Quote Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
    Mum, PLEASE tell me about stoichiometric chemistry and differential calculus.... said no child ever.

    Only following children's current interests seems to me to be doing them a disservice. How are they ever going to know if they are actually interested in certain concepts if they are never introduced to them in the first place? While they may not be a fan of every subject they study in a main****** education, they at least develop a basic awareness of each subject and can genuinely choose what interests them, rather than only have a limited pool of potential interests to choose from.

    I am sure that some children ask about differential calculus.

    I agree that never introducing kids to anything would be a bad policy to have.

  2. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
    Mum, PLEASE tell me about stoichiometric chemistry and differential calculus.... said no child ever.

    Only following children's current interests seems to me to be doing them a disservice. How are they ever going to know if they are actually interested in certain concepts if they are never introduced to them in the first place? While they may not be a fan of every subject they study in a main****** education, they at least develop a basic awareness of each subject and can genuinely choose what interests them, rather than only have a limited pool of potential interests to choose from.
    This is a really good point. Just following/teaching them about what they are interested in does seem to be limiting. Not to mention that fact that most jobs have boring elements that go part and parcel with the role. I love my job but am bored as bat**** in a couple of processes I have to do. There has to be light and shade in everything you do. You can't always only do what you want to do

  3. #113
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    Default No formal training

    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I find it fascinating that stuff like Khan Academy is being cited as a resource.

    Frankly I believe it's arrogant to think you (a general you) with no formal training, can give your child everything they need educationally.
    "A personalized learning resource for all ages

    Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content."

    https://www.khanacademy.org/about

    How is it fascinating that Khan Academy is being cited as a resource?

    It's not arrogance, it's wisdom.

  4. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    You really need to research unschooling and how it works. You need to understand how children learn best and how learning is done best with their interests. As for maths, english etc unschooled children learn these things throughout ever day life. They learn what they need when its needed, rather than being forced. Some unschooling children like worksheets and tests. Its never forced though. Some unschooled children/familes have schedules for things like activities. Others go with the flow.
    Many unschooling teens get into uni or tafe too. Reslly look into it.
    I think that's why homeschooling has a bit of a bad rap. I mean that all sounds like chaos and basically whatever goes. " They learn what they need when it's needed". What does that even mean? How do they learn? If the kids don't want to learn anything that day ( and that's basically what it sounds like, the kids are running the show) do they not have to?

    I'd struggle to see how a homeschool kid would get into uni without a hsc mark....

  5. #115
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    Default maths every day

    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Very true. I hate maths, always have. Had I had a choice I would have never did it. Unfortunately maths is needed every day and I'd be in a real pickle had I been allowed to not do it. Life is full of things we don't want to do but are good for us.
    What sort of maths do you use every day?

  6. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    You really need to research unschooling and how it works. You need to understand how children learn best and how learning is done best with their interests. As for maths, english etc unschooled children learn these things throughout ever day life. They learn what they need when its needed, rather than being forced. Some unschooling children like worksheets and tests. Its never forced though. Some unschooled children/familes have schedules for things like activities. Others go with the flow.
    Many unschooling teens get into uni or tafe too. Reslly look into it.
    In regards to learning maths for example. Are you able to teach them in their everyday life the type of maths to be an engineer, physicist, astronaut etc? These aren't concepts that can be easily taught. I'm an engineer, I did high level high school maths, a four year uni degree and now have 20 years experience. I would struggle to teach a lot of what I know, as doing and teaching are very different.

    The foundation you need for anyone of these careers is high level maths from an early stage. You are kidding yourself if you think you will just go to TAFE or uni and pick it all up then. I have been on committees over the years trying to increase the number of woman in engineering. We realized we were too late in the process. If you don't love STEM type subjects in primary school, the chance of getting into in high school or later is very slim.

    As an aside I loved school. I loved worksheets and probably would have asked about calculus. But I wouldn't have know what to ask if I didn't have the fundamentals right.

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  8. #117
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    I got into uni without a hsc mark. It's actually very easy to access uni via alternate pathways these days. Homeschooled children are consistently scoring higher across testing than their main****** schooled peers http://www.parentingscience.com/home...-outcomes.html . Note these outcomes come from structured learning, which is the type of education I provide my child with.

    I homeschool our 6 year old and absolutely love it. We do formal lessons with workbooks four mornings a week, all our sit down work is completed in around 1 hour. This is to line up with the national curriulum, so you wonder just how much time is taken at school that is not necessary (though of course it is necessary when the ratio is 1 teacher to 30 students). We school year round so that we have more time and freedom during the week and still complete the year's work.

    She has many local friends that she sees at least once a week for a few hours of unstructured play. She also attends other social outlets, rotating between swimming, gymnastics and dance. Of course there is also all the incidental socialisation such as today at the local indoor play centre, weekly visits to the library, the usual shopping, visits with family, visits with my friends and the like.

    We are a pretty normal family, average income and I doubt you would say we stand out at the park. You would have no idea we homeschool unless we told you. It really is a growing trend for average families and rightly so. Customised education is awesome. Almost anybody (and certainly the people who post on this forum) can sit with a 6 year old and guide them through their phonics and maths workbooks. It is a legitimate option for more families than is generally accepted.

    As for home educating when my child is 10, 12, 15. I'll take it day by day, year by year and always go with what's best for them.

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  10. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winter Is Coming View Post
    "A personalized learning resource for all ages

    Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content."

    https://www.khanacademy.org/about

    How is it fascinating that Khan Academy is being cited as a resource?

    It's not arrogance, it's wisdom.
    Khan is an amazing resource. We use it with our DD all the time. It's amazing bc you pick and choose when main****** is ok. When it suits to supplement, it's more than ok. But main****** is damaging isn't it?

    And IMO it is arrogance. I don't have a look at a textbook on throat surgery then operate on my child. Why? Bc I'm not trained in it. So why ido people with no formal training think it's okay to mess with their kids future bc they think teaching is easy? There is a reason teaching is 4 years at uni.

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  12. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Khan is an amazing resource. We use it with our DD all the time. It's amazing bc you pick and choose when main****** is ok. When it suits to supplement, it's more than ok. But main****** is damaging isn't it?

    And IMO it is arrogance. I don't have a look at a textbook on throat surgery then operate on my child. Why? Bc I'm not trained in it. So why ido people with no formal training think it's okay to mess with their kids future bc they think teaching is easy? There is a reason teaching is 4 years at uni.
    Yes agree with this!


    Not to mention the fact your child is getting one point of view- the parent teaching them. Really no ability to have a discussion and have different points of view. Ok there may be siblings there but same thing, it's all the same views, no outside influences.

    And where do you draw the line between teacher/parent? I think it's pretty selfish to think you can be the only one to teach and influence your child and from that they will get a well rounded education

  13. #120
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    But what about conflicts? I'm not talking about bullying...but hanging out with similar peer groups is not the same as attending a school with a few hundred kids from all walks of life day in and day out. Playground politics aren't always easy to navigate (and the schools my kids go to accommodate the kids who struggle to fit in socially), but important social skills are learnt through that imo, and I just can't see how you can mimic that in a home school environment. A few hours once a week is not the same as 6hrs per day 5 days a week. It's just not.

    As for uni, I got in to uni via alternate pathways...can't say it was easy though. Lots of independent formal education, sitting down listening to someone give you information, lots of worksheets (tut prep), and lots of structured testing. Hours and hours and hours of that stuff. At the end of it the degree I got in to was based on my formal marks. Not once did I go on a field trip. During my degree I did lots of prac...formal setting, uniform required, required to conform to the standards of the place I was.doing prac at, and having to deal with all walks of life. Not everyone was friendly either. How do kids who have been homeschooled cope in such an environment?
    I am genuinely curious, which is why I would love to hear from an adult who was homeschooled. No one I know or work with was homeschooled.

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