+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 48
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    5,750
    Thanks
    1,748
    Thanked
    2,524
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    In regards to this story in particular, while I obviously feel for the teenage parents I don't think the baby should be with them. I don't know them of course, and we only know what we've been told so I don't want to judge them too harshly, but there is a tiny dependent baby to consider and that should be the number one priority. Once the baby is safe, the teen parents should be supported to work towards being part of the child's life if that is an option.

    How young is too young? It's hard to say, but I think there is something quite telling in a lot of the comments here - I completely agree that these teenagers need care themselves, and that says a lot about their ability to be a parent. If we are all saying they need to be protected, how can we also say that they are capable of protecting that baby? A person shouldn't be a parent until they are capable of supporting, protecting, and caring for a child. And a 14 year old can't do that - sure the family can step in and help, but I would argue that the need for the family to do so proves they are too young.

    Age is not a determining factor in the quality of a parent but I just can't see how a 14/15yo can be a parent, with all that it entails (putting food on the table, a roof over their heads, putting the baby's needs ahead of their own wants, prioritising a stable home and making hard decisions), when they are still developing themselves. A 14yo does not have the same impulse control or ability to consider/understand consequences that a 20yo has. Sure, they may love the baby and play with it and feed it, but that's not all being a parent is about. Parenting is bloody hard and requires a lot of sacrifice and work, I struggle with it sometimes at 36.

  2. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Cue For This Useful Post:

    atomicmama  (19-04-2017),babybeeno1  (19-04-2017),Frankenmum  (19-04-2017),Gentoo  (19-04-2017),gingermillie  (19-04-2017),HillDweller  (19-04-2017),Tinkers  (19-04-2017)

  3. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Roleystone
    Posts
    1,881
    Thanks
    2,601
    Thanked
    2,467
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    There's no way that baby was taken just because they were young. Anyone who thinks that has no idea how the system works. In order for them to have taken that baby, there must have been no other safe option for that child. I know it must be awful to have your baby taken away and I think the teenagers need help, but right now DoFS have to do what's right for the newborn. I roll my eyes at all the comments I've seen on FB bagging out DoFS for taking the child 'for no reason'. If that baby was taken into a home with DV and drug issues and something happened to it, it would be all "Why didn't DoFS do anything about it?"

    As for how young is too young? Under 18. Actually, probably even a bit older. I think MOST people under that age are not mature enough to raise a child. And I mean not just kept them fed and alive, but actually raise another human. I'm sure there are a few exceptions to the rule, but for the most part, i don't think kids should have kids.

  4. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to HillDweller For This Useful Post:

    babybeeno1  (19-04-2017),Chippa  (19-04-2017),delirium  (19-04-2017),Frankenmum  (19-04-2017),Gentoo  (19-04-2017),gingermillie  (19-04-2017),SuperGranny  (20-04-2017)

  5. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,229
    Thanks
    977
    Thanked
    1,141
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    This is part of an article that is printed a few hours ago online. I've taken the full names out of the kids.



    WELFARE workers have swooped on the housing commission home of runaway teen parents A and B following news that baby Aria’s grandparents are facing criminal charges.

    Two officers from the NSW Family and Community Services Department arrived at the three-bedroom Dharruk home of Tracy Lavender on Wednesday morning, where she lives with Jayden, 14, and his 15-year-old fiancee.

    Her estranged partner Adam Taranto failed to appear in Mt Druitt court on Tuesday on a string of stealing charges. Her former partner — and Jayden’s father — Adam Taranto is also in trouble with the law after he failed to appear in court after allegations he breached an AVO. A warrant has reportedly been issued for his arrest.

    Tracy Lavender’s Facebook page reveals a proud mother of three children and a strong relationship with Mr Taranto which appears to have started breaking down last year.

    “My greatest treasure is, was and always will be FAMILY,” one of Ms Lavender’s Facebook posts says.

    Two Family and Community Services officers left Ms Lavender’s house this morning after finding nobody at home.

    Neighbours say the family appear to have been gone for several days.

    The teenage parents who were separated from baby Aria after sneaking the infant out of hospital and camping out at the weekend have been briefly reunited with the little girl.

    The pair became parents to a baby daughter Aria, who they smuggled out of Nepean Hospital last week, sparking a 16-hour search.

    Tracy Lavender, 47, is due in Blacktown Court on Thursday to face property charges.

  6. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    4,516
    Thanks
    452
    Thanked
    2,048
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Just read an article on fb that says the grandfather was a foster son of the grandmother hence the age difference. He was 17 and she was 33 when their first was born

  7. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    871
    Thanks
    246
    Thanked
    596
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    The fact that these children (14 is still a child IMO) have parents and grandparents that were also children when they had their babies indicates to me that in general 14 year olds probably won't make great parents - if you've got 3 generations of teenage parents then something isn't right. I'm sure there are exceptions to this rule but they would be few and far between. When I was 14 I was a complete moron, but if I had been a teenage mother at least my sensible and mature parents would have stepped up to the plate. These poor kids don't have that support because their parents are hopeless and their parents parents are hopeless, a sad cycle.

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to GingerKat For This Useful Post:

    gingermillie  (19-04-2017),Tinkers  (19-04-2017)

  9. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    99
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked
    135
    Reviews
    0
    O

  10. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Roleystone
    Posts
    1,881
    Thanks
    2,601
    Thanked
    2,467
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by GingerKat View Post
    The fact that these children (14 is still a child IMO) have parents and grandparents that were also children when they had their babies indicates to me that in general 14 year olds probably won't make great parents - if you've got 3 generations of teenage parents then something isn't right. I'm sure there are exceptions to this rule but they would be few and far between. When I was 14 I was a complete moron, but if I had been a teenage mother at least my sensible and mature parents would have stepped up to the plate. These poor kids don't have that support because their parents are hopeless and their parents parents are hopeless, a sad cycle.
    Yep. I've watched it in my own family too. My uncle had my cousin at 15, then he had his son at 15, that son has now had a child at 14.... all in a long line of drugs, alcohol abuse and toxic relationships :/

  11. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    871
    Thanks
    246
    Thanked
    596
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by HillDweller View Post
    Yep. I've watched it in my own family too. My uncle had my cousin at 15, then he had his son at 15, that son has now had a child at 14.... all in a long line of drugs, alcohol abuse and toxic relationships :/
    So sad each generation is subjected to poor parental modelling, they don't really know any better than what they are shown.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to GingerKat For This Useful Post:

    HillDweller  (19-04-2017)

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    3,576
    Thanks
    851
    Thanked
    1,073
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default **possible trigger**What age is too young to have children and be able to car...

    Haven't read all the replies, but all 3 should be removed and put into care together. However, who's to say that the mother and father will want to be together in 6 months time? What do you do then? Put him in a separate home? And then the burden of visitation begins??

    What a mess. 3 children.

    I worked with a girl who fell pregnant at 13, gave birth at 14. Didn't know she was pregnant till she was in labour. Her father played professional sport and was mortified that he had become a grandfather, he didn't want it to harm his reputation. He almost forced her to give up the baby. However she decided to keep it and in all honestly, they lived happily ever after. Granddad loved the little boy like his own.

    So although I think this is faaaaar too young to have a child, it can work out. Supportive grandparents would most definitely be vital.

  14. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    7,931
    Thanks
    5,264
    Thanked
    4,811
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    just read 2 stories online about this. it's such a hard case and impossible to know what's best. i think baby aria's interests need to come first, so if that includes taking her away into foster care, then so be it. i don't believe the 3 of them living together at the grand mother's home is in anyone's best interest. the place was firebombed plus the ice addict foster son seems to be an ongoing menace. i feel bad for the young parents but far out, what a mess.

    i think baby aria, if she is to have any chance of a stable home life, needs to go into foster care. that lavender home sounds dangerous and the parents unfortunately, are kids themselves. they've no resources, no idea, they're immature, no real support etc.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to turquoisecoast For This Useful Post:

    Tinkers  (19-04-2017)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 21-08-2013, 19:50
  2. What age is a young mum...
    By bada in forum General Chat
    Replies: 62
    Last Post: 07-05-2010, 14:28
  3. At what age is too late to introduce a dummy?
    By Lipsmacker01 in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 24-03-2008, 20:25
  4. anti ageing creams... too young?
    By 2sweetgirls in forum Beauty
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 26-02-2008, 20:13
  5. So...what age is too old to have a baby?
    By Mod-biscotti in forum Pregnancy & Birth General Chat
    Replies: 131
    Last Post: 07-12-2007, 11:39

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
FEATURED SUPPORTER
Baby Car Seats and Infant Car RestraintsBuying a baby car seat? Check out our 'go-to' links here!
REVIEWS
"Made bed time less anxious"
by Meld85
My Little Heart Whisbear - the Humming Bear reviews ›
"Wonderful natural Aussie made product!"
by Mrstwr
Baby U Goat Milk Moisturiser reviews ›
"Replaced good quality with cheap tight nappies"
by Kris
Coles Comfy Bots Nappies reviews ›