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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by HLE View Post
    Sorry a bit unrelated but I once had a GP who refused to see female patients. He saw DS regularly and when I tried to make appointment with him for myself, I was told by receptionist that he doesn't see female patients. Once I somehow ended up seeing him and he called a practice nurse to stand by. Felt a bit odd at that time.
    I bet that GP had restrictions on his license that meant he wasn't allowed to see female patients without a chaperone - that's why he would have called the practice nurse in!

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  3. #32
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    Default Can a pharmacist refuse to fill a prescription?

    Quote Originally Posted by HLE View Post
    Sorry a bit unrelated but I once had a GP who refused to see female patients. He saw DS regularly and when I tried to make appointment with him for myself, I was told by receptionist that he doesn't see female patients. Once I somehow ended up seeing him and he called a practice nurse to stand by. Felt a bit odd at that time.
    You can check their registration on AHPRA and it lists any conditions like that publicly.

    Every registered practitioner is listed here. It also lists some cancelled practitioners.

    http://www.ahpra.gov.au/Registration...titioners.aspx

    Sometimes it also has private conditions, but those are usually related to their personal health and don't need to be public listed but AHPRA monitors them to make sure they comply.

    If they have a restriction like that, it's usually a condition that they tell you why the chaperones there.

    There are also some doctors who choose to not see female patients if they have had unfounded allegations in the past, but that is so rare for them to make that step, that it's a negligible reason.
    Last edited by Lanabananah; 08-03-2017 at 23:00.

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  5. #33
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    Haven't read the replies but as a migraine sufferer I can assure you that panadeine forte is absolutely fine in pregnancy.

    Also, I used to be a pharmacy lawyer. They need to have a reasonably held belief that the drug is dangerous otherwise it's pregnancy discrimination. Considering she cleared it with your doctor I'd say it was not a reasonably held belief and I'd be contacting the pharmacy board.

    Thats appalling. Some rural areas have one pharmacy for a large radius. Imagine if those pharmacists started behaving like that.

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  7. #34
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    Default Can a pharmacist refuse to fill a prescription?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sally1981 View Post
    Haven't read the replies but as a migraine sufferer I can assure you that panadeine forte is absolutely fine in pregnancy.

    Also, I used to be a pharmacy lawyer. They need to have a reasonably held belief that the drug is dangerous otherwise it's pregnancy discrimination. Considering she cleared it with your doctor I'd say it was not a reasonably held belief and I'd be contacting the pharmacy board.

    Thats appalling. Some rural areas have one pharmacy for a large radius. Imagine if those pharmacists started behaving like that.
    You would be hard pressed to have AHPRA find against (and put any significant penalty on) the pharmacist in such a situation. If she didn't feel comfortable with the risk of giving it to the patient, then she can't really be forced to take the risk on by supplying it (but she might be asked to undertake further education about the topic so that she may feel comfortable dispensing it in the future).

    I do however agree rural pharmacists might have more trouble saying no because there's less chance of another pharmacy being able to (willing to) fill the script.
    Last edited by Lanabananah; 08-03-2017 at 23:11.

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  9. #35
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    I took panadeine forte for the whole 3rd trimester, 2 tablets every night. They were prescribed by the head dr of the maternal and fetal medicine clinic, also approved by the obstetric specialist physician. My baby was born healthy. I find it hard to believe that these people were prescribing something unsafe for pregnancy...

    I too work in the medical profession and they are prescribed during pregnancy on a regular basis for use. I think 1/2 at night to provide relief so you can sleep would be fine.

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    Email Rodney Whyte, the chemist at Monash, he's awesome for answering any questions regarding what you can take while pregnant.

    Rodney.Whyte@monashhealth.org

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  13. #37
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    With pregnancy related conditions, I trust my OB over a pharmacist. Not to dismiss the hard work and high level of education that pharmacists have, but they haven't done the whole risk assessment of me in that moment in time.

    I've had two OBs tell me to use canesten cream and to only insert the applicator half way. One (early on) said not to tell the chemist that you're preg on case they decide you shouldn't use it. The next time I was obviously preg and had to explain, in detail, my OB's instructions (in a busy store) before it would be handed over!

    I needed motilium for breastfeeding and had one pharmacist (out of many I will add, 2 babies and a total of 16 months on it, I saw a few!) questioning if I was breastfeeding and who rang my Dr.

    I was also prescribed class C antidepressants. In this case the OB weighed up that the potential risk of the medication was less than the direct risk to me of self harm. I didn't need to fill that script (long story) but I would have been mortified if, in the throes of AND, a pharmacist was refusing to fill my script based just on the risks in the book and not looking at the other side of the coin.

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  15. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    Email Rodney Whyte, the chemist at Monash, he's awesome for answering any questions regarding what you can take while pregnant.

    Rodney.Whyte@monashhealth.org
    Thank you! I could not remember this man's name but his web address/phone number is here http://www.monashhealth.org/page/dru...ation_centre_1

    I rang him when I was prescribed a med when breastfeeding and I was feeling a bit unsure. He was so nice and I also had a chat about taking it while preg next time (it's a cat D drug) and he was all for taking it. Said it is totally fine, he had even run research into that particular drug and pregnancy himself. I felt very reassured after my chat with him. I found my Pregnancy/BF hotline in my state are overly cautious and are understandably not able to be up to date with research into every drug.

    I'm on 2 cat D drugs and a cat C throughout this pregnancy. Of course I would prefer not to take them at all but I don't have any choice. No specialist consultants in Australia will take you off these meds just because you are pregnant. If a pharmacist questioned me over it and refused to dispense I would be mighty mighty cranky. I think my consultant, with 15 years + of study, 30 years practice and years of research into pregnancy and drugs has a better idea than the pharmacist. I'm really feeing for you OP I think she was very wrong!

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  17. #39
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    Default Can a pharmacist refuse to fill a prescription?

    I'm not saying drs don't know what they are talking about, (obviously they have a lot of experience and first hand knowledge about your situation)... but...
    I'm disappointed with the number of people that are discounting the knowledge and skills of pharmacists.

    They have spent a long time honing their skills specifically for medications and their use, and that means that a lot of the time (definitely not always) they u derstand the risks of medication better than the prescribing doctor. Note - from most of the examples I think the drs have made an informed decision and prescribed appropriately and I too would be disappointed if I couldn't get my script, but I believe form the sounds of it there were other options/locations to fill it

    People need to stop thinking that drs are better than pharmacists, or vice versa.

    Just the same as 2 doctors can come to 2 different opinions based on the same facts, it can also happen with a doctor and another practitioner such as a pharmacist. It doesn't always mean that one of them is a bad practitioner or doesn't know what they are talking about. They have just used their skills and made a decision based on their skills sets and own risk assessment.

    I do agree that the pharmacist could probably have dispensed the medication without harm, but, the decision to take on any perceived risk is theirs to make. They run the risk of losing their registration if something goes wrong from dispensing a medication inappropriately (not just according to the medication safety, just if it's not in accordance with the pharmacy boards guidelines which might differ from the medical boards guidelines on certain topics) so you can't begrudge them being wary of some things (but they should prob undertake edcuation into things if they are unsure)

    I would hope they made a different decision if they knew the patient had no other pharmacy options, but by the sounds of it there were plenty of other pharmacys and the pharmacist could be quite certain the patient had ability to fill the script elsewhere by someone who was comfortable taking on the risk.

    And side note, no im not biased towards pharmacists, My field of work relates to doctors, but Through that I am aware of the pharmaceutical board and their guidelines/ expectations.
    Last edited by Lanabananah; 09-03-2017 at 07:52. Reason: To clarify a statement

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  19. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lanabananah View Post
    I'm not saying drs don't know what they are talking about, (obviously they have a lot of experience and first hand knowledge about your situation)... but...
    I'm disappointed with the number of people that are discounting the knowledge and skills of pharmacists.

    They have spent a long time honing their skills specifically for medications and their use, and that doesn't mean they don't know what they are talking about.

    People need to stop thinking that drs are better than pharmacists, or vice versa.

    Just the same as 2 doctors can come to 2 different opinions based on the same facts, it can also happen with a doctor and another practitioner such as a pharmacist. It doesn't always mean that one of them is a bad practitioner or doesn't know what they are talking about. They have just used their skills and made a decision based on their skills sets and own risk assessment.

    I do agree that the pharmacist could probably have dispensed the medication without harm, but, the decision to take on any perceived risk is theirs to make.

    I would hope they made a different decision if they knew the patient had no other pharmacy options, but by the sounds of it there were plenty of other pharmacys and the pharmacist could be quite certain the patient had ability to fill the script elsewhere by someone who was comfortable taking on the risk.
    I don't think we are discounting the knowledge and experience of pharmacists.

    In my role I have worked closely with pharmacists who are fantastic at their job and have clearly improved patient outcomes as a result.


    I agree any health professional has the right to decline care or specific interventions if they are concerned, I have done this myself. I am however an advocate for my patients and maybe that is showing in my response along with many others.

    It is well known or easily found that panadine forte is cat a in pregnancy. The OPs doctor has clearly made an assessment of what is best for her and as a result has prescribed a safe drug which she is to scared to take. I think this is a very unfortunate situation.

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