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  1. #11
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    Cue, I do think there are some red flags there in terms of ASD (my only child has ASD).

    Now would be a great time to get the ball rolling in terms of a diagnosis, because early intervention is SO important. It makes a huge difference. My DS was formally diagnosed at 3 years 9 months as having ASD level 2 (moderate), but he's made so much progress since then (he recently turned 6) that I feel if he was reassessed at his age now, I believe he'd be considered high functioning.

    He is at primary school (in a support class) and is thriving. I am amazed at how far he has come since we started regular therapy.

    Happy to chat/answer any questions here or via PM. I have always found it helpful to speak to other parents dealing with similar challenges, it reminds you that you're not alone in your journey.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Degrassi View Post
    Cue, I do think there are some red flags there in terms of ASD (my only child has ASD).

    Now would be a great time to get the ball rolling in terms of a diagnosis, because early intervention is SO important. It makes a huge difference. My DS was formally diagnosed at 3 years 9 months as having ASD level 2 (moderate), but he's made so much progress since then (he recently turned 6) that I feel if he was reassessed at his age now, I believe he'd be considered high functioning.

    He is at primary school (in a support class) and is thriving. I am amazed at how far he has come since we started regular therapy.

    Happy to chat/answer any questions here or via PM. I have always found it helpful to speak to other parents dealing with similar challenges, it reminds you that you're not alone in your journey.
    Thanks for your reply, that's great to hear your DS has made so much progress! Gosh, I feel like I have a million questions but don't know what to ask if that makes any sense at all.

    What sort of intervention did you do? What was the commitment of time/money? I really don't know what lies ahead for DS but obviously I'd like to give him every opportunity to thrive.

    Do you think at 2.5 yrs he's too young for assessment and/or intervention?

  4. #13
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    My son was diagnosed a few days after his 3 rd birthday . He has ASD . He is doing very well and is now 8 . Talking , being funny and silly , at school . He was different to my other two kids . My other two made basic sentences at 2.5 / 3 they were engaged with me and what I was doing . Their tantrums where able to be fixed with being picked up or hugged .

    My son at 2.5 / 3 had almost no words . Basic words such as 'go' and a whole load of words no one understood . He didn't point or respond ( unless it was for food ) although he was very loving and used me as climbing frame ! He didn't realise when he was hurting me and he used to bite his little brother . He had a dazed , starry look in his eyes . His brothers and sister eyes where bright and engaged with you . He had so many toys but all he wanted was a small clock that he carried around and then that changed to a cheese grater that he slept with and would let go of for about 4 weeks. He couldn't interact with kids properly , he couldn't play . He was a terrible eater and only ate fruit or yogurt . He didn't sleep . Most nights we were up watching cars because he would scream otherwise . He wet the bed constantly through his nappy and he wasn't toilet trained until 4 . He wouldn't let me brush or cut his hair or nails . He was loving and wonderful but I couldn't go to a cafe with him or a place he would have to sit even for 5 seconds through fear of him running off or having a melt down .

    Now he is an awesome kid . He is different but unique . He still has a few issues with understanding everything I say , if I don't watch his diet he can go a bit wacky but I'm so happy with where he is . I thought we would be in a very different place . Diet and RDI therapy was wonderful for us . We ditched speech therapy because he hated it . I stopped asking him questions and talked about my day . Slowly , slowly he began to talk .

    Your son may not have ASD at all . He may just be doing things in his own time . I just wanted to say there is nothing wrong in seeking a diagnosis . If he is on the spectrum you will qualify for a therapy grant ( it was $12,000 back then ) then you can start some sort of therapy if you feel you should.

    Also don't worry , he may be a typical kid . Just wanted to let you know our story xxx

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  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cue View Post
    Our daycare did a development checklist on him and it was definitely an eye opener. We're lucky that they are so proactive - they are also organising an external person to come in and review the room, make recommendations on how to help him participate in the room more etc.
    This is where we are going to have issues. Her educators are all for it but the director/my boss isn't. Last year we had a girl with ASD and my boss stuffed them around so much about getting an inclusion support worker into the class. My class currently has a boy that is undiagnosed and is struggling big time. He's delayed by a year or two! She's been no help in getting support for him.

    Both DD's educators and myself have spoken to her about how DD is struggling and she just says it's the age etc.

  7. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cue View Post
    Thanks for your reply, that's great to hear your DS has made so much progress! Gosh, I feel like I have a million questions but don't know what to ask if that makes any sense at all.

    What sort of intervention did you do? What was the commitment of time/money? I really don't know what lies ahead for DS but obviously I'd like to give him every opportunity to thrive.

    Do you think at 2.5 yrs he's too young for assessment and/or intervention?
    Sorry for the late reply Cue - my DS has had the following therapies/services which have helped him:

    - Speech therapy, starting at about age 2 years 8 months (funded through the public health system)

    - Early intervention play group at age 3 (no cost - referred through public system via speech therapist)

    - ASD diagnosis at 3 years 9 months (would have liked to have it sooner, but there was a wait. We paid for our paed visit, but the diagnostic process with a Child Psychologist was funded through the Early Childhood Intervention Team).

    - Weekly sessions of OT and speech therapy (one week speech, the following week OT) funded through the NDIS (National Disability Insurance Scheme)

    - Early intervention classes run through a local primary school. Classes run for 2 hours and he went 2 days a week in 2015 and 1 day a week in 2016 (no cost, run by the Department of Education)

    - Mains.tream preschool with a full time aide - 1 day a week in 2015, 3 days a week in 2016. Paid for by us.

    - Some sessions with a Child Psychologist last year (NDIS funded)

    I do not think 2.5 years old is too early. I would get the ball rolling on a paed appointment now to go through the motions, as it can be a few months wait. For us, it wasn't until after DS turned 3 that we started to suspect ASD was a strong possibility. We had no other children to compare him with developmentally, so it took us that bit longer to consider.

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cue View Post
    thanks for your reply, that's great to hear your ds has made so much progress! Gosh, i feel like i have a million questions but don't know what to ask if that makes any sense at all.

    What sort of intervention did you do? What was the commitment of time/money? I really don't know what lies ahead for ds but obviously i'd like to give him every opportunity to thrive.

    Do you think at 2.5 yrs he's too young for assessment and/or intervention?
    I know this wasn't directed at me but I thought I would jump in as I've got a DD with ASD - hopefully that's okay.

    I think it's great that you and your daycare are being so proactive. 2.5 is young but if there are issues there it is definitely a great time for early intervention. I think your original post and follow ups do highlight some potential red flags that are worth following up with his paediatrician.

    Re: assessment, there are a number of different ways you can go. DD was assessed in a multidisciplinary public clinic free of charge. Others go through a paed/speech therapist/psych (with the paed making the final diagnosis if there is one that's applicable).

    Therapy is obviously different for everyone. Sounds like you're already linked in with a speech pathologist which is a good start. Cost will depend on whether you're in an NDIS area or not. We aren't, and when DD was diagnosed she received the Helping Children With Autism funding which is $12,000 to use before they're 7. We have used that for private social skills groups, speech therapy and occupational therapy, as well as therapy tools (e.g. games/books/climbing frames). There are also opportunities for public therapies which you shouldn't need to pay for but wait lists can be long and you may not have the choice of therapists.

    It's such an overwhelming and stressful time when you are worried there might be 'something' going on but you're not sure what it is or whether it's actually within the realms of 'normal' development. Try not to think too far ahead just yet (easier said than done) as the unknowns will make it just too stressful.

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  10. #17
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    I'm also going to jump in here (though I don't have too much more to add that the other Girls haven't) and say that 2.5 isn't too young to have your LO assessed/diagnosed and most certainly isn't too young for any kind of Early Intervention Therapy.

    My DD has just received her ASD diagnosis last week...she's only just turned 2.5 years old Luv. She sat the ADOS Assessment the day before she turned 2.5. She's been in Early Intervention Therapy since she was 14 months as she has GDD (Global Development Delay) caused by her Autism. The Intervention Therapy with OT/ST/PT has seen her advance in leaps and bounds though the area of speech is still where she's delayed the most unfortunately. It also goes hand in hand with her form of Autism too (Classic Autism).

    Anyhoo...my DD was Assessed through the Public Health System by a Developmental Paed in combination with a Multidisciplinary Team comprising of an OT, Child Psychologist (who came out to my DD's Day Care to do a Behavioural Observation), a Social Worker (who came to our home to do a Behavioural Observation). The Child Psychologist and OT performed the ADOS Assessment and a meeting was held with my DD's Developmental Paed/Multidisciplinary Team where the all the reports were submitted to her. She also considered what she and I had discussed regarding my observations about DD's behaviour, DD's Educators had made notes on what they'd observed r.e her behaviour at Day Care and what the Paed had observed at our appointments with her and then she made a diagnoses based on all of those results/factors etc, etc.

    I should also add extensive testing was also done by the Paed looking for other causes for DD's GDD. These included Microarray chromosome tests etc etc which are run of the mill also. It's normal for medical/biological causes to be ruled out via blood/urine testing etc first before looking at other causes for DD's condition (such as developmental disorders like Autism).

    I definitely think the behaviour you've described in your post is not typical behaviour for a 2.5 year old, so it would warrant further investigation. The first port of call to do that would be to see a Developmental Paediatrician or Child Psychologist though I would aim for the Paed personally. I went through the Childhood Developmental Service up here where I live (in Brisbane). I'm not sure where you are, but if you've got PHI you can often find a Paed that specialises in ASD children or if you haven't then there would be a similar Early Intervention Childhood Screening Service run through your local Gov't/hospital??? That's who runs ours up here (not sure where you're located Luv??).

    I agree with the other Girls. Try not to think too far ahead and just focus on one thing at a time. Maybe for now, just getting your LO an appointment with the Paed will be enough on the "to do" list.

    P.S...My DD also has Sensory Issues.
    Last edited by BlondeinBrisvegas; 15-02-2017 at 16:45.

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  12. #18
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    We saw DSs Paed today and he thinks there's definitely enough to warrant an autism assessment. I'm sad but also relieved as I feel like my concerns are justified.

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  14. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cue View Post
    We saw DSs Paed today and he thinks there's definitely enough to warrant an autism assessment. I'm sad but also relieved as I feel like my concerns are justified.


    Helping your DS while he is still really young is the best thing you can do for him and for your family.

    I found it quite heartbreaking when it all hit me that my DS was going to be diagnosed. In the middle of the process I had a couple of days where I was crying repeatedly. I have never looked back since those early days, only forward. I am so proud of how far my DS has come. He amazes me every day. Your little guy is going to warm your heart the same way.

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  16. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cue View Post
    We saw DSs Paed today and he thinks there's definitely enough to warrant an autism assessment. I'm sad but also relieved as I feel like my concerns are justified.
    Big hugs Hun xx. When/how will the assessment happen? Our appointment is in a month.


 

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