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  1. #1
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    Default Choosing a name in a bicultural family = headache

    So, here is the issue: my husband is Australian (originally from England) and I'm French (as in, I only came here 3 years ago so I'm still quite culturally attached to my country).

    We're trying to get a shortlist of names that we both like and we're actually having trouble finding just one girl's name and one boy's name that we both love and are excited about.
    First, I don't know what sounds bogan, outside of names shortened with "zzah" at the end, so I rely entirely on my partner for this. It has lead to many "What about this name?" "Noooo, this is so bogan he'll probably be born with a mullet" "Oh".

    The second problem is that he doesn't particularly like many French names, mostly because he's not used to hearing them so they just sound like random words to him (how cute is Malo, though? Very cute, that's how).
    There's also the fact that pronunciation is quite different between the two languages, which excludes some combination of letters. For example, we got really excited about the name River, until I realised it sounded weird in French, because of how we pronounce the "r".

    Almost any name we choose will be slightly "mispronounced" by half the family, but we should try to avoid letters that are said TOO differently.

    We also don't know for sure where the kid(s) will grow up. We'll certainly be in Australia for the next 4 years or so, but after that we might move to France, or somewhere else entirely.

    Anyway. This post sounds more like a whinge than an actual question, haha! But has anyone else been in that situation? What did you do, did you go for an English sounding name, or did you choose a name that's culturally significant to you, even if it means sometimes having to correct people's pronunciation or spelling?

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  3. #2
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    Do you have any names you like ? There has to be a compromise ? Give us a few more examples of French names and maybe we can suggest some too.

    I personally have never heard of the name Malo? Is that for a boy or girl?

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    EliseLC  (27-01-2017)

  5. #3
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    DH and I are from different cultural/ethic backgrounds but we're both the same religion so decided on Arabic names for our kids which made it a bit easier. DD1 has a name that if you don't know it's Arabic sounds like I've 'modernized' a well known name so I suppose some people might think it's a bit bogan. Whenever people enquirer about her name I say it's ***** then quickly follow up with, it's Arabic, so they realize it's not a bogan variation of the common name.

    I love French names, there are so many beautiful French names! If I were you I'd choose a name that's culturally significant. Could you choose a name that has an English and French pronunciation like Amelia/ Amelie, Angela/ Angelina, Alexandra/ Alexandrine?

    Or maybe an English first name and French middle name? And you could each use the name you prefer?

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    EliseLC  (27-01-2017)

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    I'm not as attached to my heritage (Dutch) as I'm born in Australia and only visited Holland. My husband is like 6th generation Australia. And we intend to live in Australia.
    My children all have Dutch middle names (well my eldests in German, but same theory).
    Two are very obviously foreign names, and two just look like "Aussie names" and that we can't spell. But their first names are a mix of Irish, English and American really. All with what are considered "normal" spelling here.

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  9. #5
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    DH and I are both Australian but we actually gave our dd a traditionally French name. It's quite a common name in Australia though it is pronounced slightly differently here than it is in France. There are lots of beautiful French names that Australians are familiar with. For example, Eloise, Chloe, Madeleine, Amelie. I'm not so good with boys names.
    Could you look for a name like that?

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  11. #6
    rainbow road is offline look at the stars, look how they shine for you
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    My partner is swedish and I'm Australian. We picked names that were easily pronounced in both languages. I would choose a French name for sure. But maybe one which is a little more recognised here!

    I used to look after a gorgeous little Élodie.

    Other names which are cute:

    Amélie
    Isabelle
    Brigitte
    Camille
    Jasper

    Okay so I'm stuck with boys names. But I'm sure there's many!

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    Default Choosing a name in a bicultural family = headache

    Hi there. I am a 4th generation Australian and DH is a 1st. His parents are French. DH has a very French name, his brother more so (and we have a very French surname).

    I was keen to go with a French name for our kids provided we liked it and it 'fit' here (by that I mean the child wouldn't have to spell it and clarify its pronunciation forevermore). We didn't go with a French name for our boy - we simply fell in love with another name. But we did call our girl G.eorgette C.ecile (second name after DH's French god mother).

    DD has had a pretty smooth run with her name so far. Sometimes she gets called Georgia but she cheerfully corrects people. She's very proud of her French name, which is pretty cool. And it sounds divine when my inlaws say her name (sans Australian accent!!!).

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    Default Choosing a name in a bicultural family = headache

    We are much the same. I'm Australian and my husband is South African (Afrikaner - Dutch/German) for him it's very traditional for first child to carry family names however none and I mean none translate well. He struggles daily with his name and is called a name completely different to his actual name due to the mispronunciation of letters. W is pronounced V, G is pronounced like you are clearing your throat, V is pronounced f etc etc.

    I personally LOVE the names and can pronounce them but not all Australians can or bother trying unfortunately. But I do have a love for culture.

    So we are going with simple English style names which can be pronounced in both countries that are a variation of his family names.

    We will live in Australia so it is important for the child not to have the issues with pronouncing his name correctly as this drives my husband and his father up the wall. My husband has only been here 3 years also but understands the difficulty.

    Another thing to bear in mind is that Australia is very multicultural so generally it's not a big issue.

    I have a daughter from a previous marriage her name is french Amity. I believe there are many ways of spelling it however we chose the most common spelling found for the name in Australian.

    I have a German back ground and my son's name is Uri.ch the ch is pronounced as a k. He does have to correct people but it's an easy one to correct and it's usually never an issue second time round.

    Goodluck
    Last edited by 1CrazyMoose; 25-01-2017 at 13:29.

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  17. #9
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    For inspiration maybe?

    French Australians[edit]

    Name Born Notable for Connection with Australia Connection with France
    Angry Anderson 1947 Rock singer Born in Australia Franco-Mauritian ancestry
    Ted Baillieu 1953 Politician (Premier of Victoria) Born in Australia French-Belgian ancestry
    Jason Baitieri 1989 Rugby footballer Lives in Australia Born in France
    Richie Benaud 1930 Commentator and former cricketer Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Cate Blanchett 1969 Actress Born in Australia French ancestry
    Charles Bonney 1813 Pioneer and politician Emigrated to Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Joseph Bosisto 1827 Chemist and politician Emigrated to Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Richard Boyer 1891 Broadcaster, Chief of the ABC Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Guillaume Brahimi 1967 Chef Lives in Australia Born in France
    Louis Buvelot 1814 Artist Emigrated to Australia Swiss-French
    Marie Byles 1900 Solicitor and environmentalist Emigrated to Australia from England French Huguenot ancestry
    Roy Cazaly 1893 Australian Rules footballer Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Harold Cazneaux 1878 Photographer Emigrated to Australia from New Zealand French Huguenot ancestry
    Robert Champion de Crespigny 1950 Entrepreneur Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Charles Chauvel 1897 Filmmaker Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Christabel Chamarette 1948 Senator (Australian Greens) Emigrated to Australia from India French Huguenot ancestry
    Greg Combet 1958 Politician Born in Australia French ancestry
    Minard Fannie Crommelin 1881 Environmentalist Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Celeste de Chabrillan 1824 Writer, prostitute and wife of Consul Visited Australia 1854–1856 Born in France
    Russell Dumas 1887 Engineer Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Casey Dumont 1992 Female footballer Born in Australia French ancestry
    Edward Duyker 1955 Historian Born in Australia Franco-Mauritian ancestry
    Emilie de Ravin 1981 Actress Born in Australia French ancestry
    Freda du Faur 1882 Mountaineer Born in Australia French ancestry
    Luke DeVere 1989 Association footballer for Gyeongnam FC Born in Australia French ancestry
    Johnny Famechon 1945 Boxer Emigrated to Australia 1950 (about age 5) Born in France
    Manu Feildel 1974 Chef and television presenter Lives in Australia Born in France
    Margaret Forrest 1844 Wife of Western Australia's first premier Lived in Australia Born in France
    Jane Franklin 1791 Pioneer and philanthropist Lived in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Mark Gasnier 1981 Rugby footballer Lives in Australia French ancestry
    Gabriel Gaté 1955 Chef and television presenter Lives in Australia Born in France
    Osmond Gilles 1788 Pastoralist, mine owner and colonial treasurer Emigrated to Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Robert Gouger 1802 Founding father of South Australia and colonial secretary Emigrated to Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Stephan Gouws (Gauche) 1960 Entrepreneur & Investor Lives in Australia Born South Africa Huguenot ancestry
    Edward Hamersley 1835 Pastoralist and politician Lived in Australia Born in France
    Yves Hernot 1950 Art Auctioneer and Patron of the Arts (Prix Yves Hernot) and Business man Lives in Australia French ancestry
    T. H. Laby 1880 Scientist Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Allan La Fontaine 1910 Australian rules footballer Emigrated to Australia Born in France
    Jenny Lamy 1949 Sprinter Born in Australia French ancestry
    Charles La Trobe 1801 First Lieutenant-Governor of Victoria Served in Australia 1839–1854 French Huguenot ancestry
    Dorian Le Gallienne 1915 Composer Born in Australia French ancestry
    David Le Sage 1979 Writer and anti-war activist Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Heath L'Estrange 1985 Rugby footballer Born in Australia French ancestry
    Christian Manon 1950 Actor Lives in Australia Born in France
    Sophie Masson 1959 Writer Lives in Australia French ancestry
    Jacques Miller 1931 Scientist Lives in Australia French ancestry
    Emmanuel Mollois 1969 Chef and television presenter (Poh's Kitchen) Lives in Australia Born in France
    Philippe Mouchel Chef Lives in Australia Born in France
    William Piguenit 1836 Landscape artist Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Lloyd Rees 1895 Landscape painter Born in Australia Franco-Mauritian ancestry
    John Ribot 1955 Rugby footballer Born in Australia French ancestry
    David Rivett 1885 Scientist Born in Australia French Huguenot ancestry
    Anthelme Thozet 1826 Botanist Emigrated to Australia Born in France
    Julia Zemiro 1967 Television presenter and comedian Lives in Australia Born in France

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  19. #10
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    I'm slightly obsessed with the 'waltzing more than Matilda' name site- maybe have a look there for French-esque suggestions or even email her with your conundrum and see whether she can come up with some suggestions for you! https://waltzingmorethanmatilda.com/...ench&search=Go

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