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  1. #11
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    Not a great move by the mum but the article does leave a few things out. How old are the kids? It says one was a baby but were the other two 3 or 12? Makes a big difference. Also says the kids were distressed - because their mum wasn't there or because one called the other a poo-poo head? As for taking their seatbelt off and leaning over to the front... to turn the radio up? Maybe to down out their sibling crying about being called a poo-poo head? Who knows!!! Lots of things we don't know. In general though I agree leaving your kids (who are younger than about 6-7 years old) in the car is not a wise move.

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  3. #12
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    Default Leaving kids in car for Latte

    Quote Originally Posted by 4B2L View Post
    Cannot stand this woman's attitude!! How dare she judge another mother based solely on what she considers to be an acceptable decision. I'm so sick of the way women judge other women and how it seems perfectly acceptable in society to judge mothers for things that do not in any way indicate that they're neglectful.
    This isn't about a mother giving her child coke to drink or feeding them too much McDonald's, what she did was out her children's lives at risk. It was 15 minutes! The car was still running, the kids were sitting unbuckled in the front seat.

    So I think she has every right to judge these very unsafe actions.

    However she should have said something to the mum so that she would have been helping he kids and not purely shaming the mum (there's a difference between judging and shaming)

    Also I think her rant went a bit far. Eg. What the mum did was far worse than leaving children in the shade of a petrol station with no keys in the ignition for 1 minute to pay for petrol.

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  5. #13
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    Default Leaving kids in car for Latte

    http://www.watoday.com.au/wa-news/ca...02-gt2zqr.html

    This is one reasons I wouldn't do it! You can just never be too careful with kids... I go to petrol stations I can pay at the pump or I take the kids in with me... I never leave them in the car alone.

    I think that the person writing the article should have let the mother know the kids where distressed & offered to grab the coffee for her... we are all mothers & we all understand the need for caffeine & an error our judgement, a little kindness goes a long way!
    Last edited by AmyEL; 29-12-2016 at 22:29.

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  7. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Even after reading the bit where the kids were distressed and one had undone the seatbelt and was climbing in the front of the car?
    I was referring to the actions of the author in this case. The actions of said mother are entirely unjustified.

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  9. #15
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    Maybe the mother noticed that the author was watching her children (and her) like a hawk so felt the situation safe.

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  11. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by twinklify View Post
    I was not there but I do not necessarily agree with the author's actions.

    She watched 'distressed' children. She waited so she could time the mother and then shame her? And write a post about it?

    What if someone took the car while she was 'watching and timing' the mother?

    Another option is speaking to the mother in the store and advising her kids look upset and offering to take the coffee out to her car.

    I have not done this - I can't see me doing this specifically as I do not drive much but I lose track of time - maybe that is what happened?

    I am not saying leaving kids alone in the car is ok but the author certainly is not an angel in this.
    .
    Quote Originally Posted by AmyEL View Post
    [url]
    I think that the person writing the article should have let the mother know the kids where distressed & offered to grab the coffee for her... we are all mothers & we all understand the need for caffeine & an error our judgement, a little kindness goes a long way!
    Completely agree. Why not offer to help rather than decide to shame? And how does she know the mother wasn't looking? I highly doubt the mother never looked out the window to check all was fine.

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  13. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    Completely agree. Why not offer to help rather than decide to shame? And how does she know the mother wasn't looking? I highly doubt the mother never looked out the window to check all was fine.
    So the mother looked ...and just ignored the fact that her kids were upset/about to wreak havoc by climbing in the front of the car?
    I don't buy it - I think the situation as described is proof that whatever the mother was doing she was not watching her kids closely enough.

    If this mother had depression or anxiety etc then maybe the softly touch would have worked better. However from what the author wrote (which yes is only one side) the mother was inside the shop being chipper and chatting with people. If she was just a mum who had become too comfortable in her own entitlements then I think being challenged on that was appropriate. Softly softly wouldn't do much to budge the views of a mum who was confident she had done nothing wrong.

  14. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    So the mother looked ...and just ignored the fact that her kids were upset/about to wreak havoc by climbing in the front of the car?
    I don't buy it - I think the situation as described is proof that whatever the mother was doing she was not watching her kids closely enough.

    If this mother had depression or anxiety etc then maybe the softly touch would have worked better. However from what the author wrote (which yes is only one side) the mother was inside the shop being chipper and chatting with people. If she was just a mum who had become too comfortable in her own entitlements then I think being challenged on that was appropriate. Softly softly wouldn't do much to budge the views of a mum who was confident she had done nothing wrong.
    So people never exaggerate stories they tell? Like another PP said, there are quite a few details missing, ages, why they were upset. Was the kid that climbed in front 7 years old and just sitting in the passenger seat so the mom didn't mind?

    I have depression and anxiety VP. And I'm chatty in coffee shops, I can guarantee you wouldn't know I'm depressed or anxious if you saw me in a coffee shop, I'm good at pretending I'm ok in public.

    Regardless, I highly doubt the author's story is exactly as it was. Either way, wouldn't it be nice though if she had approached the mom, like a PP said, and said 'your kids look upset, I'm happy to grab your coffee for you while you check on them.' Kind while getting the point across that you don't think they should be left alone.

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  16. #19
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    Default Leaving kids in car for Latte

    If only judging and shaming was not the accepted response. If I saw these children and honestly believed they were distressed and the mother was not watching them just so she could get a coffee I would not judge and certainly under no circumstances would I shame her. My first response would be thinking that here is a mother, like me, who has likely sacrificed many things to be a mother. Who may be stressed, tired, or who knows what. Maybe that coffee is the one thing she truly looks forward to all day before she devotes the next 24 hours to caring for 3 young children. So I would have watched the children if I was concerned and made sure they were ok. Once the mother came back and I would walked away.

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  18. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    So the mother looked ...and just ignored the fact that her kids were upset/about to wreak havoc by climbing in the front of the car?
    I don't buy it - I think the situation as described is proof that whatever the mother was doing she was not watching her kids closely enough.

    If this mother had depression or anxiety etc then maybe the softly touch would have worked better. However from what the author wrote (which yes is only one side) the mother was inside the shop being chipper and chatting with people. If she was just a mum who had become too comfortable in her own entitlements then I think being challenged on that was appropriate. Softly softly wouldn't do much to budge the views of a mum who was confident she had done nothing wrong.
    The author looked and ignored!

    If you saw a child in a store that was upset and looked lost would you take out your watch and time how long it takes for the parent to go looking for or find their child? And then write an article/post about not paying enough attention to your child at the store. But of course you CANNOT use a lead as your child is not a dog.

    So IMO yes, leaving small children in a running car is not an awesome thing to do but being someone who seems to deliberately try and make an example of a mother and then write about it is also not awesome.

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