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    Default Different schooling

    What is the difference between a IB school and different? I'm a little confused.

    I found a few public so was wondering is it better than others? Thanks

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    Subbing - I'm out today but will tell you why we chose it later!

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    Default Different schooling

    The International Baccalaureate is a highly regarded 'international' curriculum. I don't know much about the finer details but from what I understand it's student centered and allows students to choose from a range of subjects which they then study in depth across a few years.

    It's offered internationally so if you're a family that moves a lot it helps s.treamline the child's education and assists with seamless transitions across schools and countries.

    Most schools in Aus that offer it also offer the standard Australian curriculum so you can choose. I wouldn't necessarily choose a school just because they offer IB, and I wouldn't enroll my child in IB because we have no intention of moving and I think we could access more resources and academic assistance for our children if they study the Australian curriculum.

    Here's a link to the official IB website for more info:
    http://www.ibo.org

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    My Children attend a school that is an IB school using the Primary Years Program. It is basically Inquiry based learning and as mentioned above subjects are kind of weaved in together. This program is implemented in such a way at our school that it meets the Australian Curriculum (I think it may be different in High School settings where you are able to get an IB Diploma?) This style if learning has been fantastic for my boys. They could never thrive in a traditional style classroom.

    We have no intention of moving overseas and I am not sure what the PP was referring to with that regard (everything they do meets the Australian Curriculum etc)but I am a big fan of Inquiry based learning so the IB PYP program gets a huge thumbs up from me.
    Last edited by Beljane; 09-12-2016 at 15:02.

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    Thanks I'm finding it a bit overwhelming. Ahhh I just want kids goto a good school

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beljane View Post
    We have no intention of moving overseas and I am not sure what the PP was referring to with that regard (everything they do meets the Australian Curriculum etc)but I am a big fan of Inquiry based learning so the IB PYP program gets a huge thumbs up from me.
    I wasn't suggesting it doesn't meet Australian guidelines, just for us there's no need for our kids to do IB, we'll be staying put so the standard curriculum will suffice. Not denigrating it at all, as I said it's highly regarded, but I wouldn't choose a school only because they offer IB, there are a range of factors I'd consider.

    I think it suits highly motivated students that are mature enough to take a certain amount of responsibility for their own learning. For these type of children it would be a great fit, but it's not for everyone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beljane View Post
    My Children attend a school that is an IB school using the Primary Years Program. It is basically Inquiry based learning and as mentioned above subjects are kind of weaved in together. This program is implemented in such a way at our school that it meets the Australian Curriculum (I think it may be different in High School settings where you are able to get an IB Diploma?) This style if learning has been fantastic for my boys. They could never thrive in a traditional style classroom.

    We have no intention of moving overseas and I am not sure what the PP was referring to with that regard (everything they do meets the Australian Curriculum etc)but I am a big fan of Inquiry based learning so the IB PYP program gets a huge thumbs up from me.
    Yes this is the same as us - DS is doing the PYP programme, he finished kindergarten last week!

    We chose it as the IB offers an alternative way to learn the curriculum to the one currently offered ( One of the reasons we chose DS school was that it had the IB in primary school as well as high school ) and we know a few families whose kids are doing it and it just seems a better way of learning than the current way, plus it involves them learning a second language ( DS is learning mandarin) music and carrying out community service and I've also read a few Australian studies saying kids doing the IB have better literacy skills and seem to enjoy learning more

    I obviously only have experience with kindergarten but I think it seems to suit all kids - for some reason only private schools seem to do it in Australia whereas in Europe and the USA the majority of schools doing the IB are public - this is a summary about our IB primary years program:


    The International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme (PYP) is designed for students aged 3 to 12. It focuses on the total growth of the developing child, touching hearts as well as minds and encompassing social, physical, emotional and cultural needs in addition to academic development. The students benefit from caring, experienced, motivated, creative, highly-trained teachers interested in each student as an individual. Specialist teachers in Physical Education, Music, Visual Arts, a language other than English support classroom teachers to deliver appropriate curriculum to all students.

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    But what I am trying to say is the standard curriculum is a part of it and the difference is the way it is taught not what is taught.

    My kids are in no way mature and have thrived at school. I am not sure if you are confusing IB with something else? The way you are describing it is not my experience at all or maybe it's just our school?

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    But you are right, it is certainly not the only reason you should choose a school. We tried a few different schools for my eldest. The main reason they are at the school they are at is due to its close knit community feel and overall commitment to personalising learning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by monnie24 View Post
    Thanks I'm finding it a bit overwhelming. Ahhh I just want kids goto a good school
    Are you deciding where to send the kids in Adelaide and therefore where you live back here?

    IB in my mind is more of a decision for high school. You also get an IB score (different to ATAR) which helps you get into international universities should they wish to study abroad. Also at high school level it's more of an all rounder based curriculum. You HAVE TO choose 1 science subject, 1 maths subject, 1 humanities subject, 1 English subject and 1 other (which I can't remember). So it's not really tailored for kids who have strengths in just 1 or 2 of those areas such as Maths and Science or English and humanities.

    At the end of the day it's not too dissimilar from regular school, it doesn't differ as much as say a Montessori or Steiner School or Home School etc.

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