+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32
  1. #21
    AdornedWithCats's Avatar
    AdornedWithCats is offline Winner 2013 - Spirit of BubHub Award
    Winner 2014 - Best Username

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    8,395
    Thanks
    7,623
    Thanked
    3,915
    Reviews
    17
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the WeekBusiest Member of the Week - week ended 12/6/15Funniest Caption400 Posts in a week300 posts in a week
    My opinion is along the lines of what @BornToBe posted. I gave birth to ds drug-free. It's definitely possible! Calm birthing, birth skills and labouring in a birth pool helped heaps.

    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    My opinion is that they are strong drugs and your body and your baby's body is better off without them. They also contribute to something called the "cascade of intervention" which you might want to google and read up on before birthing. I've birthed two naturally, planning the third and you honestly CAN do it... but be prepared, have some distraction tools or techniques and some great support. (If that's the path you want to take. Obviously plenty of women choose an epi and love it!).

  2. #22
    TheGooch's Avatar
    TheGooch is offline Winner 2014 - Newbie of the Year
    Winner 2016 BubHubs DIVA Award
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    5,312
    Thanks
    9,577
    Thanked
    5,070
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    I had the initial dose with DS.
    It was great. Pain gone!
    But I had a reaction to it that included my heart rate and blood pressure decreasing rapidly and bubs heart rate decreasing also.
    So I wasn't able to have anymore.
    That initial dose took the edge off, didn't feel much other than pressure. Ended up with an episiotomy - offered by Ob and accepted by me. Don't regret that either. Once I had that, he popped right out!
    And because I didn't have much in the way of epidural, I was able to get up almost straight away

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    5,323
    Thanks
    1,016
    Thanked
    3,451
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    It is such a personal decision IMO.

    I would never rule it out but also never say not in any circumstance.

    Every birth is different. I did not get an epi in either as #1 I was waaaay too far into labour (pushing) and it was the early hours of the morning and #2 was far too quick with the birth. #2 I did not want it or any pain relief anyway.

    Sometimes it helps you calm down and rest during long hard labours. Or even shorter ones where you need to relax. There are also different types of epidurals.

    Ask your health care provider for all the info. Find out what they do for epi's in your hospital where you give birth.

    There are always positives and negatives. But get as much correct information and knowledge to make the decision that is right for you and your birth.

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to twinklify For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (16-11-2016),TheGooch  (16-11-2016)

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    360
    Thanks
    39
    Thanked
    112
    Reviews
    0
    I had an epi with my first two babies (c sec and vbac) and nothing with my second two (both vbacs). The epi vbac was the longest labour I've been in. I felt a little robbed of the "feeling" of birthing (I only had one
    Incase my scar split and I. Ended an ecs, if I needed an ecs they would have had to knock me out without one....) I enjoyed it more without (although more painful lol)

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,641
    Thanks
    623
    Thanked
    1,176
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Your opinion?

    I had both my babies drug free, just like I had hoped. However, my birth plan consisted of 'lets just see how things go' - especially for my first. I had no idea what position I wanted to birth in or what I would want in the room with me - I'd never done it before!
    I remember thinking in early labour with DD1 'maybe I should reconsider having an epidural, I can't do 18 hours of this!' (Luckily she was only 4 hours away!) and then thinking while birthing her 'this is not as bad as people said it would be'.
    There's no reason to rule it out if you think you may want it, you can leave your options open until it's time to decide. Sometimes you really don't know what you want until you're doing it!
    Last edited by TaylorMade; 16-11-2016 at 02:16.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    815
    Thanks
    79
    Thanked
    738
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I've had 2 babies with no medications for pain relief. All medications used for pain relief come with risks and I decided that I would not take that risk just for my own comfort. I felt pretty strongly about this choice and made many decisions to help me reach my goal. I'm super happy with my choices and so proud of the way I birthed my babies. Good luck with finding the way that is best for you and your baby. X

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    11,717
    Thanks
    3,009
    Thanked
    3,277
    Reviews
    14
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    It's such a personal thing, no 'body' is the same, no birth, pain thresholds vary, support varies as do ideals and hopes.

    You just have to read threads such as this one, to see the differing views and experiences and it tells you that we're all unique as are our births.

    But given that the OP wants opinions on epi's, for me, I do not regret not having any pain relief of any kind with my 3 vbacs. I didn't need it, nor did I want it, and I didn't want the baby exposed to it either.
    I did other things to cope with the pain of labour and that was sufficient.

    All that said though, the best mindset to go into labour imo, is to be flexible and not rigid, especially in a first time labour and delivery.
    Do your research and know your options and pros and cons of each.

    All the best with the rest of your pregnancy junebaby27.

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Mod-Uniquey For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (16-11-2016),babyno1onboard  (16-11-2016)

  10. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    5,711
    Thanks
    1,701
    Thanked
    2,491
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    I had an epidural with both of mine. The first, I had laboured all day and night, including 12 hours of really strong contractions 2-3 min apart but was only 3cm. Everyone was surprised given how strong the contractions were! I got the epi at 3am, my midwife was concerned that I was completely shattered and thought the epi would help me rest and hopefully move things along. It was the best thing I did - I relaxed, got a brief rest, then dilated quite quickly. Unfortunately DD was also exhausted and her heart rate was dropping. They turned off the epi so that I'd be able to feel contractions to push. My OB also used forceps to help, I think she was facing sideways and that was making things harder.

    I had a lot of ideas about a drug-free labour, I wanted to be in the bath and I had music prepared. But the bath made contractions a lot more painful and the music just irritated me! So before the epi I spent a lot of time standing in a hot shower.

    With DS, he was induced and I had an early epi. It was the most relaxed birth, no interventions (besides the induction and epi), and I was up and showering about an hour after he was born.

    I always say that it's best to keep an open mind. By all means prepare yourself mentally and physically as much as you can, but just see how you go at the time.

  11. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    899
    Thanks
    1,183
    Thanked
    718
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I had an epi with both of my children.

    I went in to DS1's birth saying that I didn't want one. After months of reading opinions (including several threads on this forum) I felt like I would be failing my child and being weak if I had one. But having been there, done that, I feel absolutely no guilt about it - I now realise that as much as there is an ideal surrounding a natural, drug-free birth, in reality every birth, and every mother, is different and what works in one circumstance may not work in another.

    With DS1 I initially refused an epi but changed my mind after a few hours of the synto drip. And it turned out to be a medically prescient decision - it lowered my high blood pressure, and meant they could do an episiotomy without delay when DS1 suffered a shoulder dystocia and had to be quickly helped out. When my placenta wouldn't come out, the epi reduced the pain of having the OB manually remove it (excruciating even with the epi) to stop me haemmorhaging. And had he needed to take me to theatre (a close call) they would have had to use a general anaesthetic if I didn't have the epi.

    With DS2, I opted for the epi up front. It let me rest leading up to the birth, and was a godsend when I had the exact same placenta issue again.

    Hopefully you have a wonderful natural birth that all goes easily and without any trouble, and chances are it will. But I think it's important to enter the process with an open mind, so that you're mentally prepared and don't feel disappointed or guilty if you end up needing, or simply choosing, an epi or any other treatment.

  12. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    862
    Thanks
    331
    Thanked
    285
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    There is absolutely no way I'd have a baby without an epidural

    I tried with my first but ended up caving. With my second I requested an epi every 5 minutes until I got one. The antithesis actually came into the room saying 'I heard a rumour someone wants an epidural'? I had my shirt up and back facing him before he finished his sentence. Once it kicked in everyone sighed in relief, even the mid-wife


 

Similar Threads

  1. In your opinion
    By LoveLivesHere in forum General Chat
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 20-06-2016, 22:15
  2. Chester hill opinion
    By OS&N in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 16-06-2016, 21:40
  3. formula opinion/advice
    By Hickchick in forum Bottlefeeding Support
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-12-2015, 03:52

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
FEATURED SUPPORTER
KindyROOKindyROO offers activities for babies & toddlers in a fun learning centre, focussing on developmental education. ...
REVIEWS
"Made bed time less anxious"
by Meld85
My Little Heart Whisbear - the Humming Bear reviews ›
"Wonderful natural Aussie made product!"
by Mrstwr
Baby U Goat Milk Moisturiser reviews ›
"Replaced good quality with cheap tight nappies"
by Kris
Coles Comfy Bots Nappies reviews ›