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    Default Naughty kids names on the board at school? WDYT?

    What does everyone think about naughty kids having their names on the board in year 1? I really hate it and think it achieves nothing. DS -6 has his name up almost every day. He has sensory processing issues (,recently diagnosed ) but by his nature is just never going to have the sit still and listen personality . DD-8 on the other hand has had her name up once all year. She is a model student who never gets in trouble.
    I just don't think that shaming 6 year olds does anything to influence behaviors. Actually, I know it doesn't as DS has been up there all year so it is obviously not working.
    It's a major part of the schools behaviour management program and I hate it.

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    I don't have school aged kids but I think it's really inappropriate to shame kids like that. It might also label the kids rather than focusing on actually improving behaviour.
    Last edited by AdornedWithCats; 06-11-2016 at 16:14.

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    Our teacher did happy face & sad face lists for kindy.

    I don't have a problem with it personally. Ds was on both lists and on days when he had a sad face he'd tell me why he thought he was there. His behaviour certainly improved throughout the year which I was quite happy about.

    Why don't you speak to the teacher and tell her you're not comfortable with using lists to manage your ds's behaviour?

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    I've got the same... one who follows the rules well and one who doesn't. Both great kids... just DS1 is ASD (undiagnosed) and has sensory issues. I fully support him having his name on the board. It happened much more often in prep and year 1. He actually had a permanent seating spot as he couldn't sit still on the floor. His name on the board was a reminder and a deterrent to continue with the behaviour that got it there in the first place. I'd much prefer his name be on the board than in the time out book (which also happened several times.) it broke my heart when he was given a letter that he couldn't attend the end of school disco because of his behaviour and too many time outs but was the absolute best lesson for him. He has never had a time out since and that was almost 2 years ago.

    I feel my job as a parent is to support him in making good choices, not excusing them because it might make him feel bad. His behaviour was affecting the learning of every other child in that classroom, having his name on the board was the least of my worries. Plus it was a quick way for me to start a convo about his day. If the name was on the board I could ask why, work out strategies with him and also speak about the positives in his day.

    Every teacher at our school uses positive and negative reinforcements... I feel they have their place. It sucks being the parent of a prickly kid though... I shed many tears those first two years because he just didn't 'fit' the school setting. He still doesn't, but the hard work has paid off and he's managing his behaviour well now almost finishing year 3.

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    For year 1 where students have diagnosed sensory issues I think it's disgraceful. Kids with sensory issues are best helped through positive strategies such as fidget toys, textured seats, desk enhancements, carefully thought out placement in a classroom (to reduce noise and sight distraction). Shaming a child by putting their name on a naughty list can ruin their confidence and set well planned therapy and strategies backwards.

    If it were me I would get my child's therapist to write to the school outlining what therapies are useful. And explaining how damaging naughty lists can be. I would take that to there teacher and principal and ask them to stop using the naughty list with my child.

    Any lip from the them I would say I am maintaining my own list. Every time my child makes the naughty list I am assigning a big F to the teacher and school. As they are the adults, if they can't implement effective strategies to divert a meltdown and 'naughty' behavior in a sensory challenged child then they are doing a **** job.

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    If he has SPD I'd be approaching the teacher about getting him on an individual education plan or behaviour management plan. Clearly he needs modified behaviour management, whether it be his own little chart, time out space, or incorporating techniques recommended by his OT. I wouldn't be trying to get a whole school behaviour policy changed, but essentially you have evidence that it isn't effective for your son and he has unique needs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    For year 1 where students have diagnosed sensory issues I think it's disgraceful. Kids with sensory issues are best helped through positive strategies such as fidget toys, textured seats, desk enhancements, carefully thought out placement in a classroom (to reduce noise and sight distraction). Shaming a child by putting their name on a naughty list can ruin their confidence and set well planned therapy and strategies backwards.

    If it were me I would get my child's therapist to write to the school outlining what therapies are useful. And explaining how damaging naughty lists can be. I would take that to there teacher and principal and ask them to stop using the naughty list with my child.

    Any lip from the them I would say I am maintaining my own list. Every time my child makes the naughty list I am assigning a big F to the teacher and school. As they are the adults, if they can't implement effective strategies to divert a meltdown and 'naughty' behavior in a sensory challenged child then they are doing a **** job.
    Have you spent much time around children with sensory or behavioural issues?? Sometimes what works one day doesn't the next. Teachers usually have just as much difficulty as parents if not more as there are 20 odd other students with their own range of abilities and constraints.

    OP perhaps ask if you could start a behaviour chart on your child's desk with a sticker each day for positive behaviour. Or if a day is too long for them to get through without inappropriate behaviour maybe they could start a booklet that goes between home and school with the three sessions on it. Your child could get a smiley face for a good session and sad face if there was a problem. At that age smiley and sad icons are actually a very effective way for them to understand the repercussions of their behaviour.

    That way you can encourage the positive and work on the negative.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Theboys&me View Post
    Have you spent much time around children with sensory or behavioural issues?? Sometimes what works one day doesn't the next. Teachers usually have just as much difficulty as parents if not more as there are 20 odd other students with their own range of abilities and constraints.
    .
    Yes and totally agree what works one day *may* not work the next. However, I find it difficult to believe that a properly trained and equipped teacher could not obtain a fair balance in the class by implementing some consistent core strategies that will benefit not only sensory challenged children, other children as well. If a teacher is relying on a naughty list in year 1 then to me that says they may not be equipped with the training and resources needed to do their job properly.

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    I would have a problem if the word 'naughty' was being used at any stage, by anyone involved. I wouldn't label it like that. It is inflammatory. Is that word part of the school's behaviour strategy?

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    I am a teacher and it doesn't sound as though the teacher is responding well to your son's needs. I'd be meeting with the teacher or go higher to discuss strategies to help your child succeed in the classroom.

    However, I don't disagree with writing names on the board. It helps the student and teacher keep track of where they are in terms of behaviour management. Most will have a '3 strikes policy' and this is a way of recording it. It usually deters students from progressing further.

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