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  1. #71
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    Default "Sort of spin off " is going university important?

    agree with you there sunny.

    like everyone else has already stated, if you wish to pursue certain careers (medicine, dentistry & law being the top 3 that come to mind), uni is non negotiable. I do believe most of the real learning however, takes place on the job. it's hard to get a practical sense of what your chosen job is about doing uni assignments.

    my commerce degree was like that...the theory went only so far and I reckon 95% of being an accountant was learned on the job. for instance, my degree didn't touch on gst at all so I had no idea what a bas was once I got out into my first job. with a job like accounting, I reckon a degree is just a piece of paper. there's absolutely no reason anyone who was so inclined couldn't just walk into the job and learn it all on the job.

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  3. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by turquoisecoast View Post
    there's absolutely no reason anyone who was so inclined couldn't just walk into the job and learn it all on the job.
    Would they be hired if there were an abundance of applicants with degrees?

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    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    Would they be hired if there were an abundance of applicants with degrees?
    unsure what you mean.

    what I meant was, with a job like accounting, the stuff you learn in uni isn't really relevant. it's broad based theory type stuff, they don't teach you the actual nuts and bolts stuff as that's learned on the job.

    I just found, beyond the tax unit I did, the stuff that was covered by the course was largely not seen on the job. I just question the relevance really.

    to me, accounting is a job you could teach to anyone - monkey see, monkey do type thing.

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  6. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    Would they be hired if there were an abundance of applicants with degrees?
    I wouldn't hire an accountant without a degree. A bookkeeper maybe, but not an accountant. I always hire university graduates and train them in our firm so they learn our systems and professional standards.

    If you want to be a CPA or CA you need as a minimum, a bachelor degree in accounting, and if you want to specialise in tax, you need to have studied taxation law.

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    Quote Originally Posted by turquoisecoast View Post
    unsure what you mean.

    what I meant was, with a job like accounting, the stuff you learn in uni isn't really relevant. it's broad based theory type stuff, they don't teach you the actual nuts and bolts stuff as that's learned on the job.

    I just found, beyond the tax unit I did, the stuff that was covered by the course was largely not seen on the job. I just question the relevance really.

    to me, accounting is a job you could teach to anyone - monkey see, monkey do type thing.
    I mean would someone be hired for an accounting job without a degree?

    If not then the degree is necessary.

    I do see what you mean though, 99% of the stuff I do at work I did not learn at uni but I could not get a job in my field without a degree so by default it is necessary.

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    agree with all of the above. I also wouldn't hire an accountant without a degree. and I would only engage an accountant who is CA/CPA qualified.

    I'm just saying its a job that doesn't NEED a degree. I know in real life you do, but technically I don't feel there's that much learned at uni that makes having a degree worthwhile.

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    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    The ad I saw was $130k.
    That sounds like the salary of a doctor still in training eg Resident / Intern / Registrar.

    Fully qualified doctors earn much more than that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SSecret Squirrel View Post
    That sounds like the salary of a doctor still in training eg Resident / Intern / Registrar.

    Fully qualified doctors earn much more than that.
    Must depend on the specialty.
    Last edited by PomPoms; 23-08-2016 at 17:44.

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    changed my mind
    Last edited by SSecret Squirrel; 23-08-2016 at 17:46.

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    Default "Sort of spin off " is going university important?

    Quote Originally Posted by misho View Post
    And this is what happened to me. I finished year 12 at 17 (hence why I will always push for the minimum starting school age to be raised) and had no clue what to do.

    I struggled with maturity, couldn't grasp not calling lecturers and tutors 'sir' or 'miss'. I knew I loved what I wanted to study - but never really thought about the careers that I could get with that degree.

    A gap year or starting kindy when I was 5.5, finishing school at 18.5, would have made the world of difference and I would have thought more carefully about what I wanted to do with my life.
    This was me. I was 16 when I finished high school, so 14 when I chose my subjects/path of study for Year 11 and 12 and only just 16 when I applied for uni.

    I studied what I was interested in for a while, changed and restarted different qualifications a couple of times, but it wasn't until I was 25 that I graduated with a degree.

    I agree with @turquoisecoast that you most often learn when on the job. I think my teaching degree is a prime example of that. I was a baby when I started teaching - I knew nothing and learnt most through a) making huge mistakes and b) other teachers paying it forward and helping me out stacks. I wish businesses would be more open to hiring people with no experience and training them up.

    I loved university - I loved writing essays and learning new things. I just don't necessarily think it correlates with life in the 'real world'. Unless it's a degree like medicine, psychiatry, engineering etc, which is about learning a huge base of knowledge rather than process, I really prefer the TAFE vocational model of delivering content.

    I guess to answer OP, I think it comes back to knowing what you want to do when you grow up and finding the most appropriate course of study to get you there rather than 'you should go to university'.

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