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  1. #1
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    Default Delay entry to school (5/6yr)

    Hi, I've found and read this document. How valid do you think is it (the publisher and statistics)? Thanks.

    There's another thread you can debate this issue.

    I just wanted your opinions on how "true" this document is. http://www.safeschoolshub.edu.au/doc...art_school.doc
    Last edited by 2BlueBirds; 19-08-2016 at 12:31.

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    It isn't really a report it seems to me more just an information phamplet type thing. There is not many references made to studies on the topic but it is from a good website from an educational government site

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    I don't know how valid it is but it is funded by the education department so one would hope it's legit!
    It pretty much says there are more disadvantages than advantages of holding back your child - again I really think it depends on the child , I was the youngest in my class (16 in year 12) and had no problem at all , DS is an October baby so it wasn't an issue for us but I've got 3 friends who had June babies and 2 were held back until the next year and I think for them it was a better decision as at 4.5 they were just not ready

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    Quote Originally Posted by flowers21 View Post
    It isn't really a report it seems to me more just an information phamplet type thing. There is not many references made to studies on the topic but it is from a good website from an educational government site
    I'll edit to "document" thanks

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    Thanks. I'm in Vic to cut off for prep school is end April.

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    Default Delay entry to school (5/6yr)

    Very interesting.
    The main reason for delayed entry- and yes it is delayed as they were eligible to start a year earlier- is that they are not "ready" but this report indicates that we are then possibly failing to teach them to adapt and be resilient.

    And it is interesting those who delay seem to have made their mind up long before they are eligible to start school so may not be really considering their child's capabilities (not referring to anyone in particular here).

    I don't feel comfortable with someone delaying putting their child in school without a valid reason knowing they are potentially 18 months older than a peer. It just doesn't sit right with me. Obviously June/July babies it wouldn't bother me either way but delaying a jan-May kid seems a bit.... Drastic?

    I know @VicPark compared them with delayed vaxxers and whilst those 2 groups aren't the same people, I can kind of see a comparison- a parent thinks they know better and goes against the grain of what the rest of society does.

    I'm sure @A-Squared and others will who send their kids when they are 4 going on 5 will take comfort in this study. You aren't harming your kids!
    Last edited by Little Miss Sunshine; 19-08-2016 at 13:01.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Miss Sunshine View Post
    Very interesting.
    The main reason on bubhub for delayed entry- and yes it is delayed as they were eligible to start a year earlier- is that they are not "ready" but this report indicates that we are then possibly failing to teach them to adapt and be resilient.

    And it is interesting those who delay seem to have made their mind up long before they are eligible to start school so may not be really considering their child's capabilities (not referring to anyone in particular here).

    I don't feel comfortable with someone delaying putting their child in school without a valid reason knowing they are potentially 18 months older than a peer. It just doesn't sit right with me. Obviously June/July babies it wouldn't bother me either way but delaying a jan-May kid seems a bit.... Drastic?

    I know @VicPark compared them with delayed vaxxers and whilst those 2 groups aren't the same people, I can kind of see a comparison- a parent thinks they know better and goes against the grain of what the rest of society does.

    I'm sure @A-Squared and others will who send their kids when they are 4 going on 5 will take comfort in this study. You aren't harming your kids!
    See I don't get this. Why is it our fault that our kids may be 18 months older bc you send your kids at 4? And it kind of flies in the face of the 'my child is ready' argument that is generally made. If you think your child is ready, then they are. It shouldn't matter that others who also made a decision which was in dept of Ed parameters, choose to do. If you think 18 months does make all the difference then don't send them early??

    I'm not trying to be contentious but this argument has been made a few times in the last few days and I find it a bit bizarre. You want the ability to judge when your child is ready by sending them early, but are annoyed when other parents exercise the same decision making strategies but keep their child home.

    I also don't buy the argument that those that don't go early are like anti vaxxers. There are so many holes in that comparison I don't even know where to begin.

    My first son was not ready to go early. Period. He was socially immature and lacked impulse control, attention span and general self moderation of behaviour. I had made my mind up when he was about 4 bc I know my child and he wasn't close to ready. To expect me to send this child early so others that send their kids a year early feel better/feel my child isn't ahead is, frankly, ridiculous.

    One could argue it doesn't sit right to see others send 4 year olds who aren't ready to save money or get a break - but then they would be jumped on wouldn't they?

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    Whoops, I commented in the wrong thread 😳
    Last edited by atomicmama; 19-08-2016 at 13:34.

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    Default Delay entry to school (5/6yr)

    @delirium I'm not saying it is YOUR fault, but I believe there is something wrong with our system when the age gap is so huge and it's more a parent's "choice" when to start their kids. It shouldn't have to be a parent's decision. And those who are born in the later half if the year don't have to grapple with such a decision. I really wish we didn't and it was left to the professionals.

    I agree comparing delaying school to anti vaxxers is extreme and there are many holes, but there is a similarity there in that you are going against the grain of society.

    I'm not picking on you del, and I understand you are doing what you feel best for your child. We all want what is best for our kids.

    If the schooling system cannot handle 4yo kids with poor attention spans (and let's face it, most kids do) why do they allow them to start school?

    The 18 month age gap potential makes me very uncomfortable (my jan baby won't be the oldest or youngest so for me personally it's not such a big deal) and I think there is something wrong with the starting system as it's allowing this to happen.

    Eta: I also don't think it's fair on teachers to try and cater for such a wide age gap and big difference in capabilities
    Last edited by Little Miss Sunshine; 19-08-2016 at 14:17.

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    The "article" is a document from the safe schools hub. A website that is funded (this doesn't mean it is endorsed) by the department of education (doesn't say which jurisdiction) but I found a couple of interesting things in the article...

    1.) They are talking about children who are 6 before starting school

    2.) Andrew Martin whose study was mentioned in the document refers to the disadvantages of children who were already 6 starting school, not 5.5 year olds.

    3.) a guardian article referenced at the end discusses the brain development at 4 years of age. There were only 64 participants so hardly very convincing but it measured the brain stimulation of 4 year olds. They were observed *at home* not school.

    Interestingly the two authors of this document also created the bounce back initiative which is s program they created to build resilience and confidence. They work with schools and their lessons are designed for children from which age? 5.

    Here's an article by the renown Kathy Walker OAM

    http://earlylife.com.au/info/node/211

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