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  1. #1
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    Default Long term out of the workforce?

    Just curious about people's experiences if they've been out of paid work for some time - whether sahp / unemployed / disability...

    I'm about 9 years sahm. Dd2 is only 2 so without a job / career to go back into I'm not really thinking of a job before she starts school but need to start thinking and planning. Atm we don't need me to work but I don't know if that will change in the future. It feels so weird to be so financially dependent. But also with 3 kids to consider re childcare and generally trying to keep up with the house I don't know if I'm likely to really he able to contribute financially for some time and I'm already 43! When my youngest starts primary my oldest will just be starting high school. It's hard to imagine being able to really get my teeth into a new career.

    Think I'm rambling now but wonder if many others have had this long term break from work and gone back or done something else? Dd2 is doing a few hours at cc and I love the break but even those few hours the house feels too quiet and lonely lol!!!

  2. #2
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    Following- interested in any advice. As I have been stay at home for 4.5 years already and planning on being at home for probably another 5/10 years.

  3. #3
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    My mum went back to work after about 18 years at home. She trained as an aged carer, then worked for agencies. There's a lot of demand for staff in aged care. She loved it, and also got into working with people with acquired brain injuries.

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    Freyamum  (15-06-2016)

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    I went back after 8.5yrs SAH (youngest was 1.5yo atm)as I felt guilty that DH was working 2 or 3 jobs, and never seeing his family. The idea was that I would find something that would work around his hours as he was the main breadwinner, but would give me the outlet I needed. I ended up doing nightfill at a supermarket 15mins away. I'm not home too late (last shift finishes at midnight). After a few months there, I was asked to be trained in the Deli department, which has given me the opportunity as the kids got older to pick up day work, and cut my night hours a little.

    I didn't find it that hard to find my job either, as I had a previously very good work and reference record. I had applied for 5 other jobs at different sites of the rival supermarket which I didn't get. Changed 1 thing on the application for the company that I am with now, and got the job.

    My MIL has been out of work (Basically/mostly) for 20+? years. When she went back as a casual teacher, she hated it, and set up a tutoring business which she enjoys instead

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    Freyamum  (15-06-2016)

  7. #5
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    Not in the same situation but I just noticed you said you are finding it 'hard to sink your teeth into a new career'. I am presuming you mean because of your age and time at home?

    I know someone who is around the same age as you who is currently in their last year of med school. When questioned about why 'so late in life' changing career paths the response was well I plan to be working for the next 20-30 years so that is a long time. Why not be doing something I love.

    So why you might feel it is 'late' to be starting something new, in reality its probably only half way through your working life You potentially have the next 20-30 years to work on your new career.

    Good luck

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    Freyamum  (15-06-2016)

  9. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by inner hippy View Post
    Not in the same situation but I just noticed you said you are finding it 'hard to sink your teeth into a new career'. I am presuming you mean because of your age and time at home?

    I know someone who is around the same age as you who is currently in their last year of med school. When questioned about why 'so late in life' changing career paths the response was well I plan to be working for the next 20-30 years so that is a long time. Why not be doing something I love.

    So why you might feel it is 'late' to be starting something new, in reality its probably only half way through your working life You potentially have the next 20-30 years to work on your new career.

    Good luck
    Yes I totally agree with that! One of the reasons I feel spending some time really planning isn't a waste. I guess I was more thinking that with 3 kids and no family here, dp gone 7-7 I couldn't really commit to a full time job in a new field and really give it my all. A good friend has gone back to study and she loves it but even with only 2 school kids and family who help out she is snowed under with study and hardly has any family time. I suppose I want to find that balance, doesn't everyone?? Our house would be a full time job to keep it organised and clean. But I know I'd hate it if I was just home all day keeping house. My 2 year old is particularly demanding and clingy and messy atm. She doesn't really nap (except in car or on boob) and needs me to lie with her to sleep which is around 8.30/9pm so probably my view of what's possible is clouded somewhat by the fact I'm lucky to have an hour a day to myself and generally with housework / toddler activities / after school activities / homework / meals etc I'm going non stop... But maybe if I retrain and look to get stuck into a proper job when I'm around 50 it won't matter so much those 15 years out of workforce??

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    My mum didn't get a "career" until her 40s after going to uni mature age. She has just retired after more than 20 years in that industry, which was well worth the 'late start'.

    Long ago the place I managed needed a part time admin, school hours suited our needs so really we were looking for a parent. The lady we chose hadn't had a paid job since having her 1st child 16 years ago but had studied some admin courses and done volunteer work. The lack of recent experience wasn't an issue for me as it was clear that she had kept busy while not "working" and as suspected she was an excellent, hardworking employee.

    It's important to note on the housekeeping side, when you leave at 7, kids are off in daycare/OSHC til whenever at night you have a lot less housework to do on those days. Staying on top of the washing is harder, but I only notice a big difference with the other stuff when I've got heaps on at work (eg. Report writing) or we have a busy weekend.

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    Freyamum  (15-06-2016)

  12. #8
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    I am younger than you, but I retrained after 7 years at home. Yes, studying with a family is hard...but it's only a few years and then you get a career out of it. Beats being stuck in a dead end job you hate for over a decade.

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    Freyamum  (15-06-2016)

  14. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by inner hippy View Post
    Not in the same situation but I just noticed you said you are finding it 'hard to sink your teeth into a new career'. I am presuming you mean because of your age and time at home?

    I know someone who is around the same age as you who is currently in their last year of med school. When questioned about why 'so late in life' changing career paths the response was well I plan to be working for the next 20-30 years so that is a long time. Why not be doing something I love.

    So why you might feel it is 'late' to be starting something new, in reality its probably only half way through your working life You potentially have the next 20-30 years to work on your new career.

    Good luck
    Agree. I know someone who started med school at the same time as his son, in his late 40s.


 

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