ADVERTISEMENT

+ Reply to Thread
Page 27 of 32 FirstFirst ... 172526272829 ... LastLast
Results 261 to 270 of 315
  1. #261
    harvs's Avatar
    harvs is offline Winner 2014 - Spirit of BubHub Award
    Winner 2016 - Member you'd most like to meet
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    10,242
    Thanks
    6,528
    Thanked
    16,692
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/4/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 2/4/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 19/3/15Busiest Member of the Week200 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    This to me says the problem is more so that the kids who are held back are causing the issue with those who are not. As I've said in a PP 8if every child were to start when they were supposed to and no one was held off there would only be a 12 month age gap at most.

    Not enough has been said about the impacts of too many parents holding their kids back on the other kids who still start on time (according to the State's rules)

    My DD as I've mentioned will e at the younger end of the scale and I'm not sure her pen holding and drawing / writing skills will be there, but there's no way in hell I'm holding her off until 2018 to start school just because she might be in a class with other kids who were purposely held back and are quite a bit older.
    I actually think it's a combination of issues. Even without 'holding back', now we've moved to one intake in reception in SA, a child born on April 30 can start school at 4 years 8/9ish months and a child born on May 1st will be 5 years and 8/9ish months when they start.

    That's a huge difference in maturity, and doesn't even factor in composite classes.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to harvs For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (28-01-2016)

  3. #262
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    23,384
    Thanks
    6,431
    Thanked
    17,983
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    6 months doesn't seem much but when you think of 6 months in the life of a 4.5 year old - that's 1/9 of their existance at that point - that's a lot.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    HollyGolightly81  (28-01-2016)

  5. #263
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,067
    Thanks
    736
    Thanked
    729
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    18 months is even a greater percentage for a 4.5 year old.

  6. #264
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    2,392
    Thanks
    1,519
    Thanked
    887
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    That percentage gets smaller as the kids get older.

  7. #265
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    3,302
    Thanks
    3,098
    Thanked
    2,939
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Jontu View Post
    That percentage gets smaller as the kids get older.
    The percentage may get smaller as kids get older, however when they start hitting puberty the age differences become quite pronounced and are very noticeable. Actually I've noticed it starting around year 4 or 5.

    I've experienced it from the opposite side of the fence with one of mine - she matured and went through puberty well before her friends - she suddenly was not on the same wavelength anymore and felt "too old" compared to her friends as they suddenly lost common interests, nothing to talk about etc.
    Last edited by SSecret Squirrel; 28-01-2016 at 19:19.

  8. #266
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    10,486
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,007
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by SSecret Squirrel View Post
    The percentage may get smaller as kids get older, however when they start hitting puberty the age differences become quite pronounced and are very noticeable. Actually I've noticed it starting around year 4 or 5.

    I've seen the opposite happen with one of mine - she matured and went through puberty well before her friends - she suddenly was not on the same wavelength anymore and felt "too old" compared to her friends as they suddenly lost common interests, nothing to talk about etc.
    But to be fair that can happen at any age really.

    There's only so much you can factor into the decision when you send a child to school. I was one of the oldest in my years and my sister was one of the youngest. Made no difference whatsoever.

  9. #267
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    5,351
    Thanks
    5,339
    Thanked
    5,128
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Jontu View Post
    That percentage gets smaller as the kids get older.
    It does, but that doesn't change its effect on early childhood development.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to HollyGolightly81 For This Useful Post:

    delirium  (28-01-2016)

  11. #268
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    746
    Thanks
    107
    Thanked
    200
    Reviews
    4
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaybaby View Post
    This whole thing just seems crazily confusing? In WA there are no options of holding back, so there is never a chance of there being a 18mth discrepancy in ages in any school year group. The cutoff is June 30...so all kids in Pre - Primary (the compulsory year before yr1) are aged 4.5-5.5. Kindy (year before Pre primary) is available in the govt system for 2.5days a week for all children 3.5 to 4.5.
    Most team sports here work on school year not birth year so children play with their school age counterparts.
    Just seems unnecessarily complicated in other parts of Australia. ...
    I too am a tad confused at what the rules are regarding delaying in Qld. We have the same structure where the cutoff is 30 June and 3.5-4.5 go to kindy and 4.5-5.5 go to prep (grade before year 1). DD1 is a May baby so will be due to start kindy next year and will be 3.5, and will start school at 4.5.

    Without having read the whole thread/opinions, do people have the option to delay in qld on a regular basis (ie without getting permission from school etc). We don't have plans to delay but the thought of her having to go to class with children substantially older than her if they have been kept back is concerning.

  12. #269
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    18,958
    Thanks
    1,546
    Thanked
    8,553
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by MickeyMouse84 View Post
    I too am a tad confused at what the rules are regarding delaying in Qld. We have the same structure where the cutoff is 30 June and 3.5-4.5 go to kindy and 4.5-5.5 go to prep (grade before year 1). DD1 is a May baby so will be due to start kindy next year and will be 3.5, and will start school at 4.5.

    Without having read the whole thread/opinions, do people have the option to delay in qld on a regular basis (ie without getting permission from school etc). We don't have plans to delay but the thought of her having to go to class with children substantially older than her if they have been kept back is concerning.
    Compulsory school age in Queensland is 6 years and 6 months.

    Hopefully you should be able to find a principal who is supportive of your decision to start your child at 5.

  13. #270
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    10,486
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,007
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Compulsory school age in Queensland is 6 years and 6 months.

    Hopefully you should be able to find a principal who is supportive of your decision to start your child at 5.
    My niece started year 1 in Brisbane when she was 5. She's a march child and not the youngest by a long shot.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Age of starting school
    By TeaAndToast in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 30-04-2015, 12:58
  2. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 24-02-2015, 16:15
  3. School drop off / meeting other parents
    By dragonfly84 in forum Young Parents
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-02-2015, 19:27

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

FEATURED SUPPORTER
GymbaROOGymbaROO offers activities for babies & toddlers in a fun learning centre, focussing on developmental education. ...
REVIEWS
"Made bed time less anxious"
by Meld85
My Little Heart Whisbear - the Humming Bear reviews ›
"Wonderful natural Aussie made product!"
by Mrstwr
Baby U Goat Milk Moisturiser reviews ›
"Replaced good quality with cheap tight nappies"
by Kris
Coles Comfy Bots Nappies reviews ›

ADVERTISEMENT