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  1. #591
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    jbeep - definitely common for outbursts after school! How has your DS gone over the last week or so? DD struggled at various times with being really emotional and defiant after school last year. We kept to a strict routine and let her have down time which helped.

    ahalfdozen - that's a great colour coded timetable your school provided! They sound really engaged which is nice. We are still waiting on timetables to be sent home. Hopefully this week.

    Monnie - how did your appointment go? did swimming get funded?

    WhiteMage - sounds like DS2 is doing amazingly well this year! It's so wonderful when things go right and improvements are seen. How's DS1 going at school so far this year?

    Loodle - I haven't heard of a link between ASD and night terrors. Though given all of the sleep issues ASD kids commonly have, I wouldn't be surprised if there was a link thats been shown.

    Degrassi - how's DS going at school? Still enjoying it?


    I have a meeting with DD's teacher tomorrow after school so spent some time this morning preparing a bit of a summary about DD for the teacher. She's an experienced teacher who has a great reputation so I am hoping she will take it all on board. DD has settled amazingly well into her class so far so I guess she must be doing something right If all goes well DD will have her both this year and next, which is something that I loved about this school.

    I am also hoping to organise our OT to go and do a school observation to see how DD's going socially and also check out the classroom (to see if it's well set up with a break away space, etc if needed) and to see how DD copes on the stairs (she has gross motor issues and their classroom is up two flights of stairs, which terrifies me). Not sure how keen they'll be to go there because we don't see them regularly any more, but I guess I can only try!

  2. #592
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    Asked my gp today if she knows of any links between night terrors and ASD and she said she actually gets asked this a lot so while she doesn't know of any studies it wouldn't surprise her

  3. #593
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    Quote Originally Posted by loodle View Post
    Asked my gp today if she knows of any links between night terrors and ASD and she said she actually gets asked this a lot so while she doesn't know of any studies it wouldn't surprise her
    I have seen a lot of mention about melatonin causing night terrors of the dosage is too high. Maybe that could be where a lot of the links come from too as a lot of ASD kids are on melatonin.

  4. #594
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    @sajimum DS is going really well at school. His teacher only has positive things to say, so we're really proud of him. He even got an award at the first school assembly for settling in well

    The only slight concern I have is that DS is showing an interest in going to play over on the other side of the school. DS and his class mates have an awesome playground/area, which he loves, but his curious side is making him want to play elsewhere. Last night he told me he wants to 'play in the other area of school'. I spoke to his teacher about it this morning, and she confirmed he has tried to wander over there. An older child from mains.tream tried to lead him back to the mains.tream infant area the other day because he thought DS had wandered off (he didn't know he was in the support class). They'll just have to keep a closer eye on him.

    We have a meeting on the 27th with is teacher to discuss his IEP.

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    sajimum  (16-02-2017)

  6. #595
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    My son isn't doing too bad with school. He has been in trouble a few times for saying no to doing activities or just arguing with teachers. Yesterday he didn't want to do PE, he wanted to play snakes and ladders.
    Apparently the other day when I dropped him off, he didn't want to do reading with the rest of the class so he went and stood facing a wall, just staring at it. I can see a few calls up to the principal happening this year.

    Massive different from my NT son, who last year got the principals award. It's practically the dux of the school, it's given to one kid a year and he got a computer for it. He was in 1st grade, the youngest child in the history of the school to get it. So you can see that massive difference between them. I bet it's a shock to the teachers too, expecting another kid from the same family who turns out to be a polar opposite.

  7. #596
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Degrassi View Post
    @sajimum DS is going really well at school. His teacher only has positive things to say, so we're really proud of him. He even got an award at the first school assembly for settling in well

    The only slight concern I have is that DS is showing an interest in going to play over on the other side of the school. DS and his class mates have an awesome playground/area, which he loves, but his curious side is making him want to play elsewhere. Last night he told me he wants to 'play in the other area of school'. I spoke to his teacher about it this morning, and she confirmed he has tried to wander over there. An older child from mains.tream tried to lead him back to the mains.tream infant area the other day because he thought DS had wandered off (he didn't know he was in the support class). They'll just have to keep a closer eye on him.

    We have a meeting on the 27th with is teacher to discuss his IEP.
    Is there a rule at school where they have to stay in the infant playground area? Hopefully he can be encouraged to stay there of his own accord, and if not, they will have to supervise him more closely as you say. Sounds like he's doing so well though, you must be rapt!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahalfdozen View Post
    My son isn't doing too bad with school. He has been in trouble a few times for saying no to doing activities or just arguing with teachers. Yesterday he didn't want to do PE, he wanted to play snakes and ladders.
    Apparently the other day when I dropped him off, he didn't want to do reading with the rest of the class so he went and stood facing a wall, just staring at it. I can see a few calls up to the principal happening this year.

    Massive different from my NT son, who last year got the principals award. It's practically the dux of the school, it's given to one kid a year and he got a computer for it. He was in 1st grade, the youngest child in the history of the school to get it. So you can see that massive difference between them. I bet it's a shock to the teachers too, expecting another kid from the same family who turns out to be a polar opposite.
    Hopefully the teachers manage the arguing/defiant behaviour well and it decreases throughout the year. My DD had a couple of instances of not wanting to do an activity last year - in her case it was due to anxiety, and running her through the activities and routine prior to the transition meant she was much happier. Do you know what's causing the behaviour with your DS?

    Sounds like your NT son did amazingly well last year. I am sure teachers would be used to families with polar opposite siblings and wouldn't have too many expectations!

  9. #598
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    Quote Originally Posted by sajimum View Post
    Is there a rule at school where they have to stay in the infant playground area? Hopefully he can be encouraged to stay there of his own accord, and if not, they will have to supervise him more closely as you say. Sounds like he's doing so well though, you must be rapt!
    He is supposed to stay in a certain area as him and his classmates (support unit -all have additional needs) are supervised by the teachers staff/aides. Especially him because he's only in kindy and he is at risk of absconding.

    I think he's content to play there the majority of the time (they have a truly amazing undercover sensory playground, a huge trampoline, cricket nets, wide open space etc), but being DS he is very curious about the other play areas! Apparently he has been enjoying playing cricket with a couple of the older children from the support unit, which is nice.

  10. #599
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Degrassi View Post
    He is supposed to stay in a certain area as him and his classmates (support unit -all have additional needs) are supervised by the teachers staff/aides. Especially him because he's only in kindy and he is at risk of absconding.

    I think he's content to play there the majority of the time (they have a truly amazing undercover sensory playground, a huge trampoline, cricket nets, wide open space etc), but being DS he is very curious about the other play areas! Apparently he has been enjoying playing cricket with a couple of the older children from the support unit, which is nice.
    Sounds like an amazing play area. DD would adore a trampoline at school! (though is also pretty obsessed with the monkey bars at the moment). Hopefully they can keep him contained to minimise the absconding risk.

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  12. #600
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    Quote Originally Posted by sajimum View Post
    Hopefully the teachers manage the arguing/defiant behaviour well and it decreases throughout the year. My DD had a couple of instances of not wanting to do an activity last year - in her case it was due to anxiety, and running her through the activities and routine prior to the transition meant she was much happier. Do you know what's causing the behaviour with your DS?

    Sounds like your NT son did amazingly well last year. I am sure teachers would be used to families with polar opposite siblings and wouldn't have too many expectations!
    With my son it's just stubbornness I think. He decided he wants to do, or not do something and sticks to it.
    Like the snakes and ladders thing. No one else was playing it, everyone else was doing PE. He just decided.
    We don't put up with it at home, he gets in a bit of trouble for it and he doesn't do it too much anymore. But I guess he is just trying to push boundaries at school because it's new.


 

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