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  1. #171
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    @Homeschooling4 Sorry if you've already answered, but what made you switch from home schooling to unschooling?

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicmama View Post
    Whoops, I should have been more clear. They fell below grade level.

    http://www.parentingscience.com/home...-outcomes.html
    Interesting that structured curriculum home schoolers performed really well, but unschoolers were 4 whole years behind in maths. That's pretty scary

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Interesting that structured curriculum home schoolers performed really well, but unschoolers were 4 whole years behind in maths. That's pretty scary
    I'm not surprised. Maths, beyond basic addition and subtraction, isn't something I would assume many children naturally gravitate towards.

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  5. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Sure, I get your point and I completely agree with you. As individuals we need different things educationally, and unfortunately yes, money helps (don't even gets me started on the equality debate lol)

    But I guess my point is there are options other than unschooling. Many public schools are becoming very diverse learning environments. There are the above schools popping up everywhere. I kind of place unschoolers in a category similar to anti vaxxers and imho it's not beneficial for kids.
    Again I can only speak from what I know but accessing state schools outside your zone is virtually impossible where we live. Our local state high school which is supposed to be brilliant has 2500 kids and won't take out of zone. It barely copes with what it has. Same for many primary schools. So it becomes hard.

    I don't know about unschooling it has zero appeal for me. Is it actually allowed?

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    But isn't your DD in a steiner/Montessori/IB school Sonya? There is a huge difference between that and unschooling. The former still has qualified staff, and while it is often self directed learning it is within a basic curriculum framework. There is also accountability with these alternative schools. There is none with unschooling. If there was there would be issues bc homeschoolers are meant to stick to a curriculum, US's don't do that so how do they get away with that? Clearly bc there is no monitoring or accountability.
    Yes, there is monitoring and accountability. If you are a registered home educator (and not registering is illegal), then you are required to submit your learning program to the governing body which differs in each state. "Unschooling" learning programs are approved in many states and monitored by yearly growth/performance standards by the external governing body, just like all homeschooling programs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    Yes, there is monitoring and accountability. If you are a registered home educator (and not registering is illegal), then you are required to submit your learning program to the governing body which differs in each state. "Unschooling" learning programs are approved in many states and monitored by yearly growth/performance standards by the external governing body, just like all homeschooling programs.
    What does a learning program involve? And how do they measure yearly growth without professional assessment and testing?

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicmama View Post
    I'm not surprised. Maths, beyond basic addition and subtraction, isn't something I would assume many children naturally gravitate towards.
    Fractions may get a look in in cooking. Telling the time, shapes and very basic algebra could potentially be covered.

    I can't imagine multivariant calculus or matrices and vectors coming up in a conversation and then triggering a desire in a teen to find out more on their own volition.

    Which gets back to something I touched on earlier. I don't understand how unschooled children can access tertiary education without a massive catchup program. Yes there are tertiary bridging programs, but are they a substitute for prerequisite subjects that a lot of degrees require especially in the STEM degrees. I can't imagine an unschooled child would have the requisite chemistry, physics and maths skills to tackle a degree in engineering for example.
    Last edited by SSecret Squirrel; 04-07-2016 at 14:27.

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    What does a learning program involve? And how do they measure yearly growth without professional assessment and testing?
    Honestly, if you really want to learn about it, look it up. If you google "Homeschoooling authority VIC" you will find exact information on the how and why families are approved to homeschool their children in that state, and so on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SSecret Squirrel View Post
    Fractions may get a look in in cooking. Telling the time, shapes and very basic algebra could potentially be covered.

    I can't imagine multivariant calculus or matrices and vectors coming up in a conversation and then triggering a desire in a teen to find out more on their own volition.

    Which gets back to something I touched on earlier. I don't understand how unschooled children can access tertiary education without a massive catchup program. Yes there are tertiary bridging programs, but are they a substitute for prerequisite subjects that a lot of degrees require especially in the STEM degrees. I can't imagine an unschooled child would have the requisite chemistry, physics and maths skills to tackle a degree in engineering for example.
    The theory being that if a child shows an interest ir propensity toward that subject, they would be enrolled in specialist classes to ensure the gap is not too wide to enter university and study it. The thing is, there is no time limit to learning. Take me, again. I screwed up at school. Does that mean I can NEVER be an engineer? Of course not.

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    I also view education through the prism of my age. Being in my mid 40s I have a lot of friends who retrained in completely different fields in their late 30s and early 40s. My father studied languages when he was in his 40s and now has degrees in French German and Russian.

    We hear so often that people don't know what they want to do with their lives and fall in to careers because they didn't know what else to do. I did law because I didn't want to do medicine. Simple as that. Once I became a lawyer I hated it. I've had periods where I like it and at the moment I love my job but how does a 15 year old know what they want to be?

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