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  1. #21
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    It's a pretty extensive list. I think I'd have trouble keeping up with it. It takes a bit for me to send a child to a formal time out though. I'd probably send one maybe two children a year... And once was when I was punch in the jaw.

    I do keep kids in for 10 minutes or so for many of the things listed... But that can be even after them doing it just once.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by musicalmummy View Post
    Detention is sitting for all lunch and filling out a sheet of what they did wrong. They take it home and parent signs it
    Ah ok - that's a time out at my school. I think as a parent I'd quite like to know if my child is doing those things. My DS1 had time out for kicking dust. I supported the school in giving him a time out.. Spoke to him about it and the reason for it and he no longer kicks dust. It's all a learning curve. As a teacher I wouldn't have given a student time out for that but I supported them nonetheless. I think it's important for children to respect and follow rules and guidelines.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theboys&me View Post
    Ah ok - that's a time out at my school. I think as a parent I'd quite like to know if my child is doing those things. My DS1 had time out for kicking dust. I supported the school in giving him a time out.. Spoke to him about it and the reason for it and he no longer kicks dust. It's all a learning curve. As a teacher I wouldn't have given a student time out for that but I supported them nonetheless. I think it's important for children to respect and follow rules and guidelines.
    Yep we call them reflective time outs. The child has to sit with a senior teacher at lunch time and talk about what they did, how it affected people and how they are going to resolve it/try not to do it again. The parents get a phonecall.
    I know this because my DD once had one. She had a brain snap in class and bit her best friend because she was annoying her!

  4. #24
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    With the timeouts do hey accumulate to then get a detention?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by musicalmummy View Post
    With the timeouts do hey accumulate to then get a detention?
    Timeouts are the detention. They spend the entire lunch break writing out the rule they broke. The offence gets entered in one school as a record of their behaviour on their student profile and the parent gets a letter home that has to be signed and returned.

  6. #26
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    I love those rules! I think they are very 'specific' & would be difficult to police,but I wonder if they are just trying to cover their bases, &make sure everyone is aware of expectations? I also find the 'interfering in conflicts' a bit iffy... but I would hope the teacher would encourage any positive inteference &discipline the negative. Id be happy sending my kids to a school where I know that kicking,hitting,etc is unacceptable. The school they are going to is very strict with behaviour, & I think my kids will be much happier in a safe environment where kids need to treat each other respectfully.

    Looking at your sig,it seems your boy is about 7? Seems totally reasonable exectations to me.
    Last edited by cheeeeesecake; 30-08-2015 at 15:27.

  7. #27
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    Considering they have to get THREE of them to get a time out I don't see the issue at all. The first 2 would be like a warning with the third one obtaining detention. I'd be more concerned that my child was doing those things listed above repeatedly then worrying about the fact that the school is trying to stop the behaviours =\

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  9. #28
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    Sounds good to me.

    We have a very intelligent little boy in ds's pre primary class who excludes people (including my da) on a regular basis. Now that he was caught out being physical with them he resorts to exclusion or words to make his mark. He's only 6 but he is the oldest in the class.

    Trying to get him to make friends hasn't worked thus far, so rules like this would be tops.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DesperatelySeekingSleep View Post
    In that case, I find some of them a little unreasonable to expect a child who is basically still a toddler not to break at least 3 a day if they are really strict on following through.
    Infant school is usually 5 - 7 year olds!! Hardly what I'd call a toddler.

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    I find the list comprehensive and fair. They simply are rules we would all follow at school I think just they've put them down on paper.
    As a teacher myself I would find it hard to always give the green slip...and likely a child would get a verbal warning before getting their first green slip.
    If it's school wide I think it's great. Therefore creating consistency of expectations amongst all the kids and staff etc.
    This 'interfering' one to me. ..is likely if you were causing a negative impact. Not if you were helping I would think.

    Schools should be more explicit with expectations I think. There's no room for misunderstandings then.

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