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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilahh View Post
    You must not have read the article. It's an extremely convincing read that screen time for under 2's causes language and cognition problems. I've taken the findings to save you the trouble of reading the article:

    - For each hour of baby DVD's (i.e. Baby Einstein) that infants 7-16 months watched, they knew on average about 6–8 fewer words
    - Watching 2 or more hours per day before 12 months was associated with a sixfold increase in the likelihood of language delay
    - Watching Sesame street before 3 years of age is associated with a language delay
    - Each hour of average daily television viewing before age of 3 years was associated with poorer performance on various IQ measures
    - The more TV children watch as infants (before age 3), the more likely they are to have attentional problems related to ADHD at age 7
    - Both violent and non-violent content viewed by infants is linked to attention problems


    Cat biscuits would be far better for your infant than watching TV. Despite knowing the above, I let my 18 month old DS1 watch 20-30 mins of TV every few days when I was desperate, because you gotta do what you gotta do. But don't just pooh the research- it's there, and it's crystal clear. It's bad for infants.
    The article May say that but is BS. I have never heard such rubbish in all my life.

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilypily View Post
    The article May say that but is BS. I have never heard such rubbish in all my life.

    Its not BS- it's science. Are you saying hundreds of independent researchers made up their results? Multiple scientific studies on thousands of children from a number of different countries and generations have shown that TV is bad for infants under 2. As parents we can choose to do what we like with that data- and the thousands of other findings that scientific research give us regarding how to best conceive, birth, feed, care for, entertain, educate and medicate our kids. But the findings themselves are not bs.

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  5. #33
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    Wow. Just wow. How about you parent how you want and i/we will parent how we want.

    My DD watchea aladdin on a daily basis sure its mostly only 10 minutes at the beginning but if it stops the incessant screaming for 10 minutes out of 4 hours every goddam day then guess what yes i will let her. Oh and btw she is 6 months old and reaching all her milestones early. No shame here ^.^

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  7. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilahh View Post
    Its not BS- it's science. Are you saying hundreds of independent researchers made up their results? Multiple scientific studies on thousands of children from a number of different countries and generations have shown that TV is bad for infants under 2. As parents we can choose to do what we like with that data- and the thousands of other findings that scientific research give us regarding how to best conceive, birth, feed, care for, entertain, educate and medicate our kids. But the findings themselves are not bs.
    How do they measure 'badness'. Do they ask 2 year olds how smart they feel after being exposed to television?

    There are way too many variables to prove tv impacts children in such a negative way. VP makes a very good point - anyone can say anything is better for children. I personally don't like having the TV on 24/7, but i dont think that its going to permanently scar them forever if it is.

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  9. #35
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    Just so we are clear-

    my kids watch TV.
    the findings are to expand on the reasoning behind current guidelines, I didn't post to judge you.
    do what you want with your kids.


    @heplusme "bad" in this instance means that TV contributed to language, cognition and behaviour problems. How researchers do it is use lots of different ways. Mostly, they do things like take a bunch of kids (say, 1,000) from all different backgrounds and demographics and they measure them at infancy and some other time point on things like language, cognition, aggression and attention and IQ. These are standard measures that are the same things that experts use to identify language delays and IQ and other indicators of ability. Then they measure how much TV they watched, by asking caregivers to fill out diaries and use their recall. They account for all things that impact language, cognition and behaviour, including income, education, parenting attributed, etc. then they [Insert statistical wizardry] and data results showing how TV uniquely has impacted the infant, after everything else has been accounted for.

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  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilahh View Post
    Its not BS- it's science. Are you saying hundreds of independent researchers made up their results? Multiple scientific studies on thousands of children from a number of different countries and generations have shown that TV is bad for infants under 2. As parents we can choose to do what we like with that data- and the thousands of other findings that scientific research give us regarding how to best conceive, birth, feed, care for, entertain, educate and medicate our kids. But the findings themselves are not bs.
    No, we are saying that there is no way that the researchers could know it was only tv. There are so many factors involved in a child's learning.
    Were all the other standards met perfectly in order for them to be able to say that tv was causing this?

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  13. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilahh View Post
    Just so we are clear-
    Then they measure how much TV they watched, by asking caregivers to fill out diaries and use their recall.
    This right here is the problem. Caregivers can make it up.
    If I was asked to participate in a study to show the negative impacts of too much tv, I could lie- either because I don't want people to know how much tv my kids watch, or because I think kids shouldn't watch tv and want a negative link.

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    Here is an interesting review of all the research

    http://www.parentingscience.com/effe...ng-speech.html

    Basically it is saying that kids have developmental delays associated with tv, because kids learn by actually interacting with people rather than watching.

    If you are having plenty of interaction with your child, I wouldn't worry too much about a bit of time in front of the tv while you get some things done.

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    I have also seen the research and do agree that many many studies over many years have shown that TV CAN have negative links, especially with speech and language. However, i do reiterate that SOME tv as a part of a balanced lifestyle is ok. I use rv - not for my kids benefit, but my own - its my break time. Eg, this morning, we had brekkie, did playdough, baked cookies tigether, read stories and played outside. Then the older two had 20mins of tv while thw baby slept & i had a coffee. It was nice down time for all of us.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lilahh View Post
    Just so we are clear-

    my kids watch TV.
    the findings are to expand on the reasoning behind current guidelines, I didn't post to judge you.
    do what you want with your kids.


    @heplusme "bad" in this instance means that TV contributed to language, cognition and behaviour problems. How researchers do it is use lots of different ways. Mostly, they do things like take a bunch of kids (say, 1,000) from all different backgrounds and demographics and they measure them at infancy and some other time point on things like language, cognition, aggression and attention and IQ. These are standard measures that are the same things that experts use to identify language delays and IQ and other indicators of ability. Then they measure how much TV they watched, by asking caregivers to fill out diaries and use their recall. They account for all things that impact language, cognition and behaviour, including income, education, parenting attributed, etc. then they [Insert statistical wizardry] and data results showing how TV uniquely has impacted the infant, after everything else has been accounted for.

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  18. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by DT75 View Post
    This right here is the problem. Caregivers can make it up.
    If I was asked to participate in a study to show the negative impacts of too much tv, I could lie- either because I don't want people to know how much tv my kids watch, or because I think kids shouldn't watch tv and want a negative link.
    It's an issue that plagues all areas of human research, there are a lot of ways researchers minimise the effect of liars to negligible levels.
    - they take big samples, because lots of people don't lie
    - they devise measures that have cheat detectors built into certain questions
    - they have complex statistical thingys that can detect deception
    - if researchers anticipate high levels of bs, they don't tell you the true purpose of the study
    - they make recommendations, such as the no TV for under 2 year olds, based dozens of high quality studies testing thousands and thousands of different kids

    If you do all this, you negate the effect of lying, which really doesn't happen that much anyway.

    in answer to the first question, these are studies that have already taken out the effect of parenting, income, education, parental IQ, preterm birth, breastfeeding, etcetera all the things that can affect language, cognition and behaviour. Researchers measure as many things as they can to allow them to isolate what effect TV has.

    guidelines are developed off of many, high quality research studies. This isn't something some wacky Amish paediatrician has just tossed out. It's the consensus of the paediatric academy, based off very strong evidence.

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