+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    11,982
    Thanks
    7,812
    Thanked
    6,764
    Reviews
    13
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 29/5/15Busiest Member of the WeekBusiest Member of the Week100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by BettyW View Post
    I just thought I'd jump in and say I did use one of those 'pillows' and I will again for the next bub. For those who haven't seen them they're firmer than a cot mattress and only about 2cm high so I personally wasn't worried about increasing DS's SIDS risk by using it. They don't actually alter the head's position in sleep either - just have a shallow indent/ hole to cradle the back of the head. When DS was 3 or 4 months old he started being able to wiggle off it so I stopped using it.
    Yep I use one too with no issues.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Bald Hills, Brisbane
    Posts
    39
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked
    12
    Reviews
    0
    I wasn't trying to scare anyone, merely suggest we use our motherly instincts as sometimes Dr's will say 'dont worry about it' but if you are still concerned you can get other opinions or pursue it as there may be an underlying cause ie torticollis.

    My 3 and half yr old had a helmet for it, they both had plagiocephaly which does actually cause disfigurement of face as it misaligns the ears and eyes etc if not corrected. He still has a flat side but my second son who had the same thing but because I knew about it physio etc helped significantly although he still has a flatter side too. But I still don't think you need to be concerned prior to bub being born it's just a case of being aware like I said. Hollygolightly81 we will need to agree to disagree lol

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    5,338
    Thanks
    5,293
    Thanked
    5,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week

    Default Flat head syndrome.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rhilu View Post
    I wasn't trying to scare anyone, merely suggest we use our motherly instincts as sometimes Dr's will say 'dont worry about it' but if you are still concerned you can get other opinions or pursue it as there may be an underlying cause ie torticollis.

    My 3 and half yr old had a helmet for it, they both had plagiocephaly which does actually cause disfigurement of face as it misaligns the ears and eyes etc if not corrected. He still has a flat side but my second son who had the same thing but because I knew about it physio etc helped significantly although he still has a flatter side too. But I still don't think you need to be concerned prior to bub being born it's just a case of being aware like I said. Hollygolightly81 we will need to agree to disagree lol
    I think we're misunderstanding each other, my 'scare' comment was a general comment regarding things like people who are not professionals (ie a shop assistant) advising what you should do. And I totally agree to do something if it is disfiguring the face or a more serious condition but in general, a 'normal' flat head will fix itself. I'm also not saying not to do anything like reposition head, physio, etc. I'm just saying try not to worry that it's a huge deal that you need to be trying to prevent before the baby is even here.

    It is interesting though to see the difference in attitude and approach between the uk and Australia. Do kids in the UK generally have flatters heads because they're more laid back about it here? Probably not.

    Eta: and the reason I worry about SIDS is because I've lost a baby before and as a result know quite a few people who have lost their babies to SIDS. It's just something on my radar that I'm passionate about.
    Last edited by HollyGolightly81; 20-02-2015 at 20:23.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    5,338
    Thanks
    5,293
    Thanked
    5,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week

    Default Flat head syndrome.

    Just posting this from the SIDS and kids site for anyone interested.

    'Flat ‘pressure’ spots can develop if a baby lies in one position on the head for long periods of time and are sometimes referred to as positional plagiocephaly. These flat spots tend to improve with age and most will disappear completely as baby’s head grows and when baby starts to sit up and look around.

    However, in some babies these flat spots can persist. A small number of babies with severe flattening require fitting with a specially designed helmet to help reshape the head. This is very rare. Prevention and treatment Positional plagiocephaly may be prevented or treated by simple repositioning techniques and by minimising pressure on the head when baby is awake. It is best to implement these simple measures from birth.
    · Always sleep baby on the back, not on the tummy or side.
    · Alternate the head position each time baby goes down to sleep (left and right).
    · As babies become more alert and interested in the environment they like to look at certain objects before falling asleep. Sleeping baby at alternate ends of the cot will encourage him or her to look in different directions. Changing the position of the cot in the room may also have the same effect.
    · When the baby is awake, minimise the time that baby spends lying down with pressure on the same part of the head. Carry and cuddle baby in upright positions.
    · Avoid prolonged periods in car seats, strollers, swings and bouncers as this places additional pressure on the back of the head.
    · From birth, give baby increasing amounts of side lying and tummy time to play when awake and being observed by an adult but never put baby on the side or tummy to sleep.
    · Alternate the holding position when feeding baby i.e. hold in left arm for one feed and the right arm for the next feed.

    A small number of babies can develop positional plagiocephaly as a result of tight muscles on one side of the neck, a condition known as torticollis or wryneck. If the baby has a strong preference for turning the head to one side, or has difficulty turning the head please consult a doctor who can then arrange physiotherapy treatment. Remember, always put baby on the back to sleep and keep baby off the back of the head as much as possible when awake.

    Alert
    Positional devices that restrict the movement of a baby or the baby’s head are not recommended.

    For more information on this topic, see the SIDS and Kids Information Statement Baby’s Head Shape. This statement can be downloaded from the SIDS and Kids website under ‘Safe sleeping’. Alternatively, call your nearest SIDS and Kids office on 1300 308 307 to request a copy to be sent to you by mail.'

    http://www.sidsandkids.org/faq/

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Bald Hills, Brisbane
    Posts
    39
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked
    12
    Reviews
    0
    Ok no worries.

    So sorry you have lost a baby, I can understand SIDS is a cause close to your heart. There is so much to worry about with your children isn't there. I definitely agree with it not being something you need to try prevent before baby is here.

    Are you in the UK? You said they are more laid back about it there? I remember when I was researching it all with my firstborn, there was some articles about people trying to get the NHS to pay for helmets etc. And from what I recall they are really expensive over there? It is interesting. I'm having my third in a few weeks and we will be vigilant about head positioning not necessarily using a pillow but turning etc because I know mine have this predisposition to it.

    Certainly making sure bub is safe from any SIDS risk is much higher priority than head shape, as it is 90% of the time a cosmetic only issue.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Rhilu For This Useful Post:

    HollyGolightly81  (20-02-2015)

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    5,338
    Thanks
    5,293
    Thanked
    5,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week

    Default Flat head syndrome.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rhilu View Post
    Ok no worries.

    So sorry you have lost a baby, I can understand SIDS is a cause close to your heart. There is so much to worry about with your children isn't there. I definitely agree with it not being something you need to try prevent before baby is here.

    Are you in the UK? You said they are more laid back about it there? I remember when I was researching it all with my firstborn, there was some articles about people trying to get the NHS to pay for helmets etc. And from what I recall they are really expensive over there? It is interesting. I'm having my third in a few weeks and we will be vigilant about head positioning not necessarily using a pillow but turning etc because I know mine have this predisposition to it.

    Certainly making sure bub is safe from any SIDS risk is much higher priority than head shape, as it is 90% of the time a cosmetic only issue.
    Thanks . Our daughter was stillborn, not sids, but I've met many women who have lost their babies for many reasons through my support groups so I am just super vigilant but because of one particular friend, sids is very much in the forefront of my mind.

    We are currently in the UK, we moved here from Melbourne when I was pregnant. You're right, the NHS will only provide helmets for severe cases (ie, effecting the face) you have to go privately otherwise and the private system here is very expensive. We have international insurance cover so that's not really an issue for us though.

    Here's the link for Great Ormond Street Hospital which is an amazing children's hospital here.

    http://www.gosh.nhs.uk/medical-infor...y-information/

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to HollyGolightly81 For This Useful Post:

    Rhilu  (20-02-2015)

  9. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    42
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked
    9
    Reviews
    0
    Thanks for the replies. Sorry I have not been back to check this topic as my hubby just came home from surgery (abdominoplasty).
    I ended up taking it back & got store credit. I decided if I need it later I can always purchase it again.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Babyisbored For This Useful Post:

    HollyGolightly81  (26-02-2015)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Flat head prevention pillows
    By cnic in forum Newborns (0 - 2 months)
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-01-2015, 23:27
  2. Can babies still develop flat head after they turn 6 months?
    By someonesomewhere in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 23-08-2014, 22:21
  3. Help please obvious flat spots on my DD head!!
    By Mama of 1 in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 19-03-2014, 06:49

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
FEATURED SUPPORTER
TreeHutVillageWe offer a secure, quick and easy way to hire and lend baby equipment. It directly connects families across Australia ...
REVIEWS
"Made bed time less anxious"
by Meld85
My Little Heart Whisbear - the Humming Bear reviews ›
"Wonderful natural Aussie made product!"
by Mrstwr
Baby U Goat Milk Moisturiser reviews ›
"Replaced good quality with cheap tight nappies"
by Kris
Coles Comfy Bots Nappies reviews ›