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  1. #11
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    It is a huge myth that type 2 can be prevented. Genetic play a massive part in it.
    This is a huge bugbear of mine.

    People look down on people with type 2 like we'll it's all your fault etc..

    You REDUCE your chances by eating well and exercising.

    Evening you life a perfect life you can still develop it.

    Take my husband family out of the 9 siblings 8 have type 2 with 6 of those need insulin injections. The 9th one is only in her 30's so has a high chance of getting it.
    Some of them are and have always been fitness addict.


    Than the if is my mum who while having a risk due to genetics. (2 sister have it) her lifestyle increase her risks dramaticly.

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    laray  (09-11-2014)

  3. #12
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    Witwicky is offline A closed mouth gathers no foot.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyV View Post
    @Witwicky thanks for starting this thread. I think you've provided some great information here.

    I just wanted to add that though type 1 often appears in childhood it can develop at any age. My brother and father both have type 1 diabetes. My brother was diagnosed at age 3 whereas my father first developed symptoms at 42 years of age. A lot of people seem to assume that adults who develop diabetes must have type 2.
    Yep that's why I said adults can be diagnosed as well I believe this is why they have largely stopped using the name Juvenile Diabetes (and also because 'juvenile' indicates that it goes away once they are adults).

    I know two people who were diagnosed as adults, one in her thirties and another in his forties.

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  5. #13
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    Great thread. My DH has T1D, it's so frustrating the amount of misinformation that is out there - like that it's caused by eating too much sugar. So it's great to see some of those myths being addressed here

  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyV View Post
    @Witwicky thanks for starting this thread. I think you've provided some great information here.

    I just wanted to add that though type 1 often appears in childhood it can develop at any age. My brother and father both have type 1 diabetes. My brother was diagnosed at age 3 whereas my father first developed symptoms at 42 years of age. A lot of people seem to assume that adults who develop diabetes must have type 2.
    this happened with my mum and sister my sister was diagnosed as a child and then mum in her 40s it seems to be quite common



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    Witwicky - thank you for sharing this information.

    My brother is mildly intellectually disabled and it's clear there is something going wrong with him medically at the moment. My mother is beside herself with worry. He is going to need a lot of tests done. After reading this thread I am going to suggest the possibility of him having diabetes and getting him tested ASAP.

    Is the diagnostic process straight forward?

  8. #16
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    After being diagnosed with GDM with my 2nd child I discovered how little I knew about diabetes.

    Things I knew before (that I think are correct). Some have already been mentioned.

    A child having a hypo can present like having a tantrum. Yes, refined sugar fast is needed.

    Bad sleep can really muck up a diabetic's blood sugars.

    It is no longer recommended to send a diabetic whose sugars are too high out for a run as it can damage their heart.

    Insulin is the 'key' to the lock opening the door of a cell and letting glucose in. Insulin resistance is when the insulin being produced isn't unlocking enough doors (the cells are 'resistant') so the glucose just keeps circulating in your blood (elevating blood sugar levels) and the pancreas gets the message to keep making more insulin.

    After my diagnosis I discovered:

    All pregnant women are a bit insulin resistant. It is believed this is to ensure a little extra sugars get through to the baby to meet their needs.

    My PCO put me at risk for GDM and now I am at risk of type 2.

    It isn't about sugar, it is about carbohydrates. You can cut every source of 'sugar' out, but live off white rice and white bread and have shocking BSL.

    I recently got a BSL meter (17 months post partum). My 6w GTT was perfect (2hr =4.8) but I am now producing the odd level over 7 (I need to eat some serious carbs to do this). Apparently, if you body is working perfectly you should never get a reading over 6.7 at 2hrs. So I'm worried that I'm on my way to type 2. There are autoimmune issues in my family and my mum is 'prediabetic'.

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    Last edited by Little Ted; 09-11-2014 at 14:12.

  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by [Mod] Degrassi View Post
    Witwicky - thank you for sharing this information.

    My brother is mildly intellectually disabled and it's clear there is something going wrong with him medically at the moment. My mother is beside herself with worry. He is going to need a lot of tests done. After reading this thread I am going to suggest the possibility of him having diabetes and getting him tested ASAP.

    Is the diagnostic process straight forward?
    Literally just a finger prick at the GP for a presumptive diagnosis (followed by blood tests to confirm).

    My son almost died as a 12-month old because he was so sick and no-one knew why. He spent ages in hospital after diagnosis, including intensive care. All it would have taken to check was a simple finger prick.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Witwicky View Post
    Literally just a finger prick at the GP for a presumptive diagnosis (followed by blood tests to confirm).

    My son almost died as a 12-month old because he was so sick and no-one knew why. He spent ages in hospital after diagnosis, including intensive care. All it would have taken to check was a simple finger prick.
    That would have been terrifying

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    Thanks op and others for sharing all this information in this thread.

    I have a question, if i want to get my kids 3yo and 5yo tested for diabetes by my gp, what would this likely involve?
    The reason I ask is having read some of the symptoms I have noticed ds has sweet smelling /fruity breath and dd goes to the toilet a lot (have taken her to gp before and urinary tract infection ruled out). Anyway I don't want to be overreacting but would rather be safe than sorry. I had gdm with both pregnancies and both my parents are on medication for high blood glucose as well.

    I will take them to gp but would like to be prepared beforehand on what to expect. Thanks.


 

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