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  1. #41
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    OP is there a smoke alarm in your DS's room?

    That would be my main concern - that there is a working smoke alarm in his room that would a) wake him in enough time for him to be able to knock and wake you before being overcome by smoke or b) is loud enough for you to hear through his door, from your room.


    I know it's unlikely, but there have been cases of house fires caused by rats and mice chewing through electrical wires in wall/roof cavities, which could start a fire at any point within the house.
    There's also a small risk if there is something like a night light plugged in (I heard a fire investigator a few years ago say that they were aware of faulty night lights causing house fires)
    Last edited by sky1; 05-07-2014 at 10:35.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anjalee View Post
    It does depend on the layout of course, but that's why it's extra important to have all exits available to kids. If there is a fire in a kids room, you'd rather two potential exits than one.
    There's nothing in my kids rooms to catch on fire, but currently two out of three of my kids have a window on one side, and doors that open to the outside on the other, with their bedroom door to the house on a different wall) so it's easy enough for me to tell them to get out if there is a fire. Also, it's important to weigh up the risks....I have never been worried about a fire in one of my kids rooms, but I wasn't worried about my DS starting one when he started playing with the stove at 2am. Thankfully he stopped before it got to locking him in point, but it's a hard thing to deal with. My first two weren't like it, I'm not sure why my third child did it but it is such a hard thing to deal with.

  3. #43
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    I'm curious about what things in the bedrooms are posing a fire risk? Obviously, locked or not, if there's some big danger I'm unaware of I'd like to know and avoid it.

  4. #44
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    Aside from some people having small heaters in rooms, there are aircon vents. If they're on (reverse cycle too), and a fire outside (even kms away) ambers can be sucked in and set the house alight that way. It does happen. In recent bushfire in the perth hills this is how a lot of houses were set alight (and lost).

    Not only that, it's the outside the house risks. What if a fire somehow starts outside the kids room? Sure, it's a small risk, but it happens! Before I met my husband, he lost half his house this way. The teenagers next door had a party, a small fire stared in their yard and a palm tree in DHs yard caught fire and ended up touching his roof and setting his house on fire.

    Small odds I know... But why risk it?

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anjalee View Post

    Small odds I know... But why risk it?
    Well you would risk it if your toddler is at risk of burning the house down, getitng stuck in the fridge (mine would climb up and in to the fridge), or burning themselves (see my previous story about the twins who set themselves alight in the early hours of the morning). You have some very valid points, but I think that there can be valid reasons for locking a child in to their room as well. I knew a few parents who have put the safety locks on the door handles in the child's room so they can't open the door themselves for various reasons.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Party of Three View Post
    Well you would risk it if your toddler is at risk of burning the house down, getitng stuck in the fridge (mine would climb up and in to the fridge), or burning themselves (see my previous story about the twins who set themselves alight in the early hours of the morning). You have some very valid points, but I think that there can be valid reasons for locking a child in to their room as well. I knew a few parents who have put the safety locks on the door handles in the child's room so they can't open the door themselves for various reasons.
    Do gates not work?

    Genuine question! Not being snarky, just wondering if a gate would serve the same purpose as locking a kid in their room?

  7. #47
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    Twins I used to nanny for had a lock on their room in their first house. I'm not sure how often they used it at night but those two were CHEEKY buggers that constantly egged each other on and I understand why it was needed. They ended up selling that house and rented for a bit, so no lock on their door. They woke up one morning to their 3 or 4 year old daughter having turned on the oven and placing frozen croissants on the wire rack, making breakfast for everyone. She did stuff like that more than once. Yes, they were old enough for boundaries but with two of them they often talked each other into things they knew were naughty.

    As for a breathing mat, fairly certain you're not meant to use them because they're unreliable after a certain age/weight. So you may end up getting false alarms.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anjalee View Post
    Do gates not work?

    Genuine question! Not being snarky, just wondering if a gate would serve the same purpose as locking a kid in their room?
    I would personally use a gate but I know the twins I mentioned above would have definitely found a way to jump it!

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anjalee View Post
    Do gates not work?

    Genuine question! Not being snarky, just wondering if a gate would serve the same purpose as locking a kid in their room?
    My 2 year old knew how to unlock them and climb over them. We had to put a lock on the baby gate on our stairs so that it wouldn't open when he got it open due to the extra lock holding it in...he solved that by breaking the bar the lock was attached to. So no, in our instance it wouldn't have...but a gate is the same as a lock in terms of a fire...if they can't get out of a baby gate, they may as well be behind a closed door.

    Oh and please know I'm not 'picking' on you! I know when it was me going through this with my son I was made to feel so guilty by parents for even considering it, but they didn't have my child and I feared for his safety in the middle of the night. My first two would just wake up and come to us, or call out to us, my third was a whole different ball game. Plus I used to have sit in the doorway of his room for two hours each night until he fell asleep. It was a huge game for him, but it was so tempting to get those two hours back each night by locking him in a room where he could be safe to do what he wanted and fall asleep once he gave up on his game. I tried letting him stay up until he crashed a few times to avoid the two hour 'let me get out of my bed' game at the beginning of the night...he'd last until anywhere between 11pm and 1am. If I sat in his doorway he at least was asleep at 9-9.30.
    Last edited by Full House; 04-07-2014 at 22:19.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Party of Three View Post
    My 2 year old knew how to unlock them and climb over them. We had to put a lock on the baby gate on our stairs so that it wouldn't open when he got it open due to the extra lock holding it in...he solved that by breaking the bar the lock was attached to. So no, in our instance it wouldn't have...but a gate is the same as a lock in terms of a fire...if they can't get out of a baby gate, they may as well be behind a closed door.
    But doors could be left open to hear them.


 

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