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  1. #11
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    What actually sucked? Why do you think you sucked?

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    I was nervous and whilst I don't think it showed too much (just made me look serious I think lol) I couldn't just get up there and talk/teach IYKWIM.

    I just felt rigid and 'taught' from a PowerPoint and handouts but it didn't feel very inspiring or natural.

    Which I guess is normal but I'm worried I won't improve over the next few weeks!

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    Primary trained here took but I have taught R - 12. I so remember the anxiety of pracs. I still remember some really, really sucky days and cringe when I think of them.

    Three things I'd like to add:

    I think in teaching more than most professions, you only make a mistake once. (Um...I don't mean you only ever make one mistake but I am tired and can't think of how to word this properly.) Embrace your mis-steps and errors of judgement because you truly will learn from them, and better now when you have someone to bounce off immediately.

    Secondly, relationships are key, particularly at secondary level. Once you get that sorted, behaviour management is easier, and your lessons will seem to go better, even if they aren't as exciting or successful as they could be. You're given more goodwill by your students, so to speak. Remembering little details about your students is helpful. Use humour when managing behaviour as much as possible (although not sarcasm). Be consistent (I always struggle with this one). Be honest - you can say things like 'last lesson didn't go as well as I'd hoped' or 'I don't think I explained that very well, let's try again'.

    Forgive yourself and open yourself up to feedback from your mentor teacher. Experienced teachers have so much to give. If you can can be humble and say things like 'I realise today didn't go that well - how could I have improved it?' they will (should) have all the time in the world for you.

    Pracs are so, so much harder than 'the real thing'. Learn from today and keep your chin up :-)

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strawberry Kisses View Post
    I was nervous and whilst I don't think it showed too much (just made me look serious I think lol) I couldn't just get up there and talk/teach IYKWIM.

    I just felt rigid and 'taught' from a PowerPoint and handouts but it didn't feel very inspiring or natural.

    Which I guess is normal but I'm worried I won't improve over the next few weeks!
    Totally normal. If you reflect what might you change or do differently?

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    Strawberry Kisses  (04-03-2014)

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    Hmmm I think that's why I feel like a bit of a failure - I put heaps of work into the lesson and lesson plan and was really organised but still didn't feel I could just talk naturally, I had to read off my notes. Also I've noticed other teachers add in funny stories, etc to make it more interesting and I was pretty dismal at this - nerves again I guess. If I could change my inexperience then I would definitely change that :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strawberry Kisses View Post
    Hmmm I think that's why I feel like a bit of a failure - I put heaps of work into the lesson and lesson plan and was really organised but still didn't feel I could just talk naturally, I had to read off my notes. Also I've noticed other teachers add in funny stories, etc to make it more interesting and I was pretty dismal at this - nerves again I guess. If I could change my inexperience then I would definitely change that :-)
    But what would you change about the actual lesson? How could you engage students apart from being the "sage on the stage"?

    The best learning happens when we get out if the "tell" zone and provide experiences for discovery.

    What are you teaching?

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    Strawberry Kisses  (04-03-2014)

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    One of my first pracs was awful and I've since moved through the ranks to leadership positions, so don't assume that just cause you feel like it's been a bad start that it will always be like that.

    I agree with the others -- act confident and importantly, don't talk down to the kids. They hate being condescended to. Even though you don't want to actually teach, having a handle on what really happens in classrooms will help you relate to them heaps.

    Try to 'contextualise' something from your lessons for the kids -- ie the stories you say other teachers tell. I've started a science lesson on separating mixtures by telling the kids about cooking fried chicken. Have a 'hook' for them or think of an appropriate anecdote when planning. Or just ask questions -- kids love to talk about themselves!

    Ask your supervising teacher to be brutal with feedback. The worst prac I had was so bad cause I wasn't told that what I was doing wasn't working - it's great that you're being so reflective already, it can only serve you well.

    Good luck

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    Strawberry Kisses  (04-03-2014)

  12. #18
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    I think you're being way too hard on yourself! Teaching is an art which takes years to develop. Talking in front of people also takes practice. The more you do it the more comfortable you'll get. Try to break up lessons into whole, part, whole - intro/provocation - independent/group work - reflection,

    This will give you a break from talking and a chance to see students individually and start developing relationships.

    What year level us it?

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  14. #19
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    [QUOTE=mrsharvey;7685723]Primary trained here took but I have taught R - 12. I so remember the anxiety of pracs. I still remember some really, really sucky days and cringe when I think of them.

    Thanks - I'm not used to being inexperienced and bad at my 'job' and am struggling with it! And yes - cringing often :-/

  15. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyla View Post
    But what would you change about the actual lesson? How could you engage students apart from being the "sage on the stage"?

    The best learning happens when we get out if the "tell" zone and provide experiences for discovery.

    What are you teaching?
    I guess I would change the structure of the lesson - I tried to include a variety of resources but there was probably still too much 'teaching' from me - I would have preferred some more student-orientated activities (but went with what was requested of me). I'm teaching Science, Year 11.


 

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