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  1. #1
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    Default Has been seen to, but still think she might have "something..."

    So start of this year DD finally got seen by someone in regards to possibly being on the spectrum. I got on hte waiting list when she was 4(ish), but she was 6 when she was seen, so went from a non-school-aged kid, to a kid in her 2nd year of school.

    They asked me a few questions and said, "No, she's just bright but quirky." I didn't really feel like they did much to figure out if there was anything different about her... and I'm still not feeling like it was right.

    Chanel is different, and yesterday just reminded me of it. We went to SeaWorld and whenever I'd look over at her, no matter what we were doing, she'd be sitting there, serious-faced as ever. While other kids were squealing in delight, she was just sitting there. (Oh, she's 7 btw... lol). Until she saw me looking at her. Then she's smile, or force a fake laugh and say "Mum I like SeaWorld."

    I often feel like this though... she seems to look at me looking at her and think, "How am I supposed to feel here?" and then reacts appropriately. Once she realises something is a joke, she pushes out a forced, fake laugh. When she knows she's at somewhere that's fun, she'll do a fake smile and tell me she's having fun. Yet... it doesn't seem believable. Does that make sense?

    It's also the same with bad things. Like if she knows something is supposed to be sad or scary, she'll frown or try to look scared, but I can tell it's not genuine. She'll tell me she's sad or scared too. But again, it's not genuine. It's like she's just playing the role she thinks she's supposed to play.

    Now, she does have genuine fun occasionally... but not often. She's a very serious kid.

    Other things that lead me to believe she was different were just things like:

    She's a stickler for rules. When she was little I said, "Don't talk to strangers." She has stuck by that rule for years and will absolutely NOT talk to you. Even with my permission. She will freak and say, "But that's a stranger!" Despite explanations. Same applies to everything. She will have a meltdown if I cross somewhere other than a crossing/lights. She will freak and tell me how I'm going to end up in jail if I don't stop the car and put my p-plate back up (the back one always falls off mid-drive). I will say, "Bedtime is 7.30," and she will crack it if whatever show we're watching finishes a minute either side, and say "but its; not bedtime!" or "it's past bedtime!" as if it even matters. Just very... set. If you say, "get a plate," when you mean "bowl" she will go mental. Say, "get your shoes and socks on," she'll get angry because it should be "socks and shoes," since that's the order they go on... etc.

    And a bunch of other stuff but I don't want to go on and on...

    So do I see if I can get her looked at again? I just have the feeling something's not quite "normal" with her... and I have heard that girls, and especially the other they get, are harder to diagnose with these things becuase they learn to adapt to appear more normal than they are... and their markers are a bit different... or something...

    Anyway, sorry for the ramble, but i'd really appreciate any help/advice. OR recommendations on sometime to see for diagnosis/help in the Brisbane area (I'm northside if that makes a difference).

    Ta.

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    Sounds like my 9yo DS, he has mild Aspergers. Stickler for rules and very serious. Plus an assortment of other mild emotional/behavioural/social/sensory issues.

    I don't really know what to say, maybe she does have something there, maybe not. I'm not even sure what to recommend for you to do next. My DS was diagnosed through a child psych.
    What I did want to say is that even if she is on the spectrum or whatever, she's very good to be 'going through the motions' of social behaviours, when you say she makes herself laugh when appropriate etc. That is half the battle with kids like this; you have to teach them by rote about what to do in social etc situations, they don't truly gain insight into it, but they just know this is what they have to do.
    So if she is diagnosed at least you know she'll be good with her strategies that they get given!

    Good luck!

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    ellie13 is offline We have been blessed with 2 gorgeous miracles!!
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    Hey. Just wanted to say I had similar with DD now 10yo. Her original pead just couldn't make up his mind etc. so I invested, took all the testing we had done to a well recommended pead ( private) and he gave us a dx on the spot. He couldn't believe that the other guy wouldn't dx since from the tests it was clear that she is ASD. He also put her on medication- and it's just great. She is finally smiling again.

    Follow your gut, it's usually right.

    Good luck.

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    Default Re: Has been seen to, but still think she might have "something..."

    Sassy - From reading your posts on the hub over the last few months... Id always assumed your DD had already been dx'd with Aspergers or Autism.

    Sound alot like my son, Aspergers.

    Go with your gut and seek private paediatrician whom others recommend. If getting a dx means getting her help, go for it. I'm sure you're already doing alot of the stuff you can at home (sensory breaks, sensory modulation exercises, picture schedules, slower speech when talking to her, etc etc

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    SassyMummy  (19-10-2012)


 

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