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  1. #81
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    I don't like it, and have never used it. If someone called my nephews 'rangas' I'd be annoyed. They're little boys thanks, and they are more than their hair colour.

    Equally I find it rude to call someone 'blondie'.

    Not the worst thing in the world, but that doesn't make it less rude.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiamondEyes View Post
    I just find it awful particularly because its short for orangutan, i mean, is it acceptable to refer to chubble bubbies or people as hippos or another chubby animal? Or people with with long faces to be called horse or whatever?

    I just dont see why one is acceptable when the others are clearly not.

    And i love so many of people in this thread and can see the 'preperation angle' is out of love. But i find it upsetting that parents feel they need to do that.
    I don't see why so many people are offended being likened to an animal. Personally, I would rather be likened to the animals that roam this planet than a good portion of the people. Orangutans are beautiful gentle animals with lovely hair colour. What's not to like about a "ranga"?

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  4. #83
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    'Ranga' is one of those words that confuses me (a fellow red-head). I'm really not comfortable with it and I can't fully explain why.

    I understand there is a difference between a word being used as a term of affection at home, and that same word being used outside the home to offend/insult someone. I get that.

    I also get that the world isn't fair, you're going to get picked on for something, it's just a word, blah blah blah.

    As a red-headed kid/teen, I copped all sorts of comments and insults about my hair, and I agree it was the intent behind those words that wounded me, rather than the words themselves. But the words still hurt.

    And I agree with PP's who asked where do we draw the line with insulting words? Kids will, after all, be kids and say all kinds of horrible things to one another.

    But I still hate the fact that 'ranga' seems to be socially acceptable when so many other words are considered discriminatory, and people are just being 'sensitive' when they say they don't like it.

    I would hate to think that my kids were being called 'ranga' by anyone, but especially in a school/kinder/childcare setting and that I should just suck it up because I was being 'sensitive'.

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    Quote Originally Posted by halloweendee View Post
    in the playground children are always going to call each other names, usually based on some type of physical appearance. whether it is their hair color, skin color, body type, height......
    where do you draw the line?
    and because some people find it offensive, should it be 'banned'? what about the people who use the term endearingly....
    and i can't believe some posters are equating the word ranga with the n word. worlds apart
    No I don't think it should be 'banned', but surely if people are saying they find it offensive and don't want themselves or their kids called that name then that should make people think twice before using it? To perhaps not use it when talking to strangers, and not assume that the redheads in their life are okay with it.

    And with kids in the playground - habits can be changed. There are many insults and names used in the past by kids that are no longer socially acceptable, and no longer used in the playground. Kids repeat what they hear the people around them say. If adults didn't use the term fewer kids would.

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    Funny, most people *I* know IRL who do have red hair or children with red hair refer to themselves or children as rangas and aren't offended at all.
    Maybe it's just our community.

    I really don't see what's so offensive about it. And as far as a stranger goes I can say I have never commented on their hair unless I really like the style, regardless of color.

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    No red haired members in my immediate family but I wouldn't use the term as I feel it's degrading and if I did have a red haired child would not like the term.

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    Quote Originally Posted by halloweendee View Post
    in the playground children are always going to call each other names, usually based on some type of physical appearance. whether it is their hair color, skin color, body type, height......
    Not in our playground. Children should not be taught that it's acceptable to make any kind of derogatory comment about any aspect of another's appearance. The thought that this kind of behaviour is acceptable has been stamped out of the workplace; it is entirely possible to stamp it out of schools.

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    I think some people find it upsetting, because being red haired is not usually something we see as positive in our society. So even if 'ranga' is meant in an affectionate way, it's still drawing to attention to something that is societally looked down upon.

    I guess it's a bit like (affectionately) referring to someone as "chubber". I hear a lot of people do this with their kids, and I don't like that. We don't prize being chubby in our society, and so to draw attention to it almost seems like putting them down in that way that family often do. That "I'm only joking - where's your sense of humour?" type way in which family can say the cruelest things that stay with you forever.

    Friends/ colleagues will think nothing of calling someone "ranga" without knowing if it might offend, but there are very few people (I hope) that would blithely call someone "chubber" in the same way.

    I agree with MissMuppet - maybe people should think twice before calling someone else's kid by that name, or drawing attention to something in a way that could be seen as insulting.

    When I was pregnant there was lots of joking by some of my friends about "Better hope you don't have a ranga!" And it bothered me, as I knew I would cop 'hilarious' abuse if I did. The thought of people laughing at my kid - even in a 'we don't really mean it' way was heart breaking.

    DD is blonde, but I still feel a little twinge of defensiveness when people say anything jokingly/ affectionately mean about her.

    People can be mean sometimes.

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    I find it bad enough being known as and referred to as 'the blonde'. I don't understand why people are defined by such things?? To me, it's similar to labelling someone negatively by their race, i.e. wog *cringe*. I work with somebody who calls himself a ranga and that's fine if he doesn't find it offensive.

    But others do, so I won't use it and I would never, EVER teach my son that name-calling is okay.

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    Quote Originally Posted by halloweendee View Post
    in the playground children are always going to call each other names, usually based on some type of physical appearance. whether it is their hair color, skin color, body type, height......
    where do you draw the line?
    and because some people find it offensive, should it be 'banned'? what about the people who use the term endearingly....
    and i can't believe some posters are equating the word ranga with the n word. worlds apart
    Actually 'ranga' and n1663r are not so far apart, especially when names like 'jungle bunny' are still used to offensively describe children of dark skin, that linked with when people of African descent were referred to as being trainable animals one step above monkeys.

    And, yes this sort of thing CAN be stamped out of the playground. Firstly parent lead by example and school enforce, guide and teach about acceptable language.

    Firstly we need to teach the adults - that is the hard part. Kids are easy to teach - its unteaching prejudices that is hard. Kids do NOT naturally call each other names, that is a learned action - generally taught by ignorant adults

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