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  1. #41
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    I loved Belleville. Unfortunately my brothers didn't and we voted on all Lego purchases, so I never had any, I always played with it as ASC.

    We have the older princess Duplo for the kids. DS loves it.

    My DD has a green and pink room because I force my tastes on her while I still can.

    We don't buy much mass produced stuff and most of my kids clothes are handmade, we also don't watch broadcasted television. So I guess they're somewhat insulated from gender stereotyping through colours.

  2. #42
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    I couldn't give 2 hoots what colour my kids wore/were their favourite and what toys they played with/what colour they are, as long as they aren't dangerous.
    My children are their own personalities and I have never and will never dictate what they should have.
    I have an assortment of toys from matchbox cars, tonka trucks, kitchen and plastic foods, dolls, cot, dress ups, puzzles, Lego, farm house and animals, trashies, barbies, chess, dinosaurs, dolls house. Not once have I ever heard any of my kids, regardless of their gender or age, say to anyone else that they can't play with cuz because your a boy/girl. In their eyes everything is for everyone. And before anyone tells me "wait til they get to school and mix with other kids", 3 of them are at school.
    My sons favourite colours are red, blue and orange and purple.
    Dd1 loves blue and just blue. She doesn't limit her clothes to just blue though. She wear lots of green.
    Dd2 loves pink and purple
    Dd3 doesn't really care but I dress her in red white and navy a lot cause I think it's cute.
    This gender things is a load of $& in my opinion. You are born either a boy or girl. Yes the shops and media etc have made the "boy" "girl" thing but it's up to the parents to just ignore it and do their own thing. It's not about eliminating colours or forcing certain toys, it's just about giving your child the right to choose what they want to play with and just being non judgmental towards other peoples choices

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    Clarabelle  (24-04-2012)

  4. #43
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    Every colour is nice in moderation, but the way girls are blanketed in pink is just shallow. Boys limited to blue, green and grey is dull too.

    I see kids as people not as boys and girls. They should be able to wear and play with anything not be limited to just gender stereotypes.

  5. #44
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    My daughter loves pink....it makes her happy so she wears a lot of pink. She also likes to put on makeup :O and disney princesses. However my nephew puts my makeup on as well (much to his fathers disgust,) and my daughter and my nephew play with cars and dress up like princesses. Who cares?
    She also loves tutus and dresses, she likes how they go when she spins. Am I going to stop her doing 'girly' things to make a stand? no.
    Am I going to stop my nephew wearing makeup? no.
    I just want happy kids.

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    Quote Originally Posted by share a book View Post
    It's socially acceptable to buy a truck for a girl, dress her in jeans and a blue t-shirt, or let her ride a Spiderman bike. It is not socially acceptable to buy a doll for a boy, dress him in t-shirt with a pretty pink pony, or give him a Disney Princess bike to ride on. Why is this?
    Well, not everyone goes along with what's socially acceptable though do they? It's quite possible to overanalyse this - people will generally do whatever suits them. I suppose the fact is that most boys don't want to play with dolls or wear a shirt with a pink pony on it. If they do, well good for them, and their parents. It doesn't bother me

  7. #46
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    Also my daughter wears her pink tutus to her dance class...... I guess if I listen to what some people say I shouldn't let her partake in this stereotype...even though she loves it :P

  8. #47
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    lambjam is offline Nitwit! Blubber! Oddment! Tweak!
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    Quote Originally Posted by share a book View Post
    It's socially acceptable to buy a truck for a girl, dress her in jeans and a blue t-shirt, or let her ride a Spiderman bike. It is not socially acceptable to buy a doll for a boy, dress him in t-shirt with a pretty pink pony, or give him a Disney Princess bike to ride on. Why is this?
    I think it's partly because there's a hangover from earlier days when such things were considered signs of homosexuality, and ought not be encouraged.

    Try telling DS2 he can't have the pink bike .

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    Isn't it interesting how Angelina Jolie's little girl (Shiloh, is it?) is often photographed wearing boy's clothing and holding a pirate sword etc? I get that they are happy with that - they'd probably be thrilled if she was wearing a pink tutu as well. If one of their boys wanted to dress in a more feminine way maybe they'd think that was fine to share with the world too?

    Fitting in with society doesn't seem to be on their agenda. Good for them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lambjam View Post
    I think it's partly because there's a hangover from earlier days when such things were considered signs of homosexuality, and ought not be encouraged.

    Try telling DS2 he can't have the pink bike .
    I look at kids dd's age (8 to 10) and can see a lot of the kids starting to accept differences. Then recently I started taking my nephew, 11 months, to a baby singing session for under 2s and the differences again are astronomical. Boys in pink jumpsuits with purple frills, little boys trying to breastfeed baby dolls. I do believe this is the beginning of the end for gender stereotyping.

  13. #50
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    lambjam is offline Nitwit! Blubber! Oddment! Tweak!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jascar View Post
    Also my daughter wears her pink tutus to her dance class...... I guess if I listen to what some people say I shouldn't let her partake in this stereotype...even though she loves it :P
    As long as she doesn't mind my son joining her in his pink tutu, I don't see the problem


 

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