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  1. #1
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    Default What do you suggest to help a Grade 1 child who struggles?

    So, DD1 is in grade 1, and really struggles with simple things (alphabet, numbers, etc.) Her teacher has said that she is going to get a referral for us to get her assessed again... but I am really worried that she might need to be kept back at this rate. I really want to help her. Anyone have any suggestions? She won't listen to me so some people have suggested tutoring, but is she too young for tutoring? What else could I do?

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    GluttonForPunishment  (27-01-2012)

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    Does your school have a learning support officer? If so, I would ask them for strategies and ask about workshops also. At our school there are 2 LS teachers and they run regular programs for parents wanting exactly this kind of help.

    Otherwise you can get a private learning support tutor, but it can be hard to find a good, affordable one. She's definitely not too young. My mum was a learning support teacher and had great success when tutoring early primary to help them keep up. Its easier to do it now before they get too far behind.

    Does your school do Jolly Phonics? Its great for helping kids with learning sounds/letters and is also lots of fun. Our teacher offered us resources on Jolly Phonics if our kids were struggling. If your school don't do it, try looking it up online. Readings Eggs is also good for helping kids learn letters etc and you can buy it online, and its fun so its not too hard to get kids to sit down and play with it. You can get a free trial to see if your child is interested.

    For numbers, the tv show Number Jacks is really good and little kids love it.

    Good luck! i hope you find something that helps.

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    def not too early for a tutor...they can really help them and early is the best time before they fall behind.

    Have you tried reading eggs? We loved that when my son was learning to read...lots of fun and easy to do at home.

    Lots of games help...uno, monopoly junior etc, don't tell her she is learning...it's all about playing.

    Does she have something that she is really interested in? Try and base learning around that topic.

    Also, is she a young year 1? Repeating a year is not always a bad thing...by staying back she may well become a very confident and happy lil thing cause she is working at the right level. getting a really good grasp on the basics means she will do better in the rest of her education.

    Have they checked eye sight and hearing?

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    My daughter struggled terribly in Year 1. She was not kept back, but I wish she had been. Because she was behind, it just got worse every year until Year 5 when I took her out of the school (who'd refused to repeat her) and repeated her at another school.

    She then had a breather to catch up and started doing really well, came top band in a lot of her last naplan results etc.

    She went to Kip McGrath tutoring for about 4 years too, for help with reading (she was very delayed) and basic maths. The building blocks. If you get behind on these basic foundations it's just impossible for kids to go on to more advanced stuff as they dont have those basics to draw on.

    I guess I'd also really want to say that please dont take this as a reflection of yoru child's future ability or intelligence or effort.... some kids just take longer to mature in different areas and a child that struggles with reading in year 1 may be a bookworm 5 years later but ONLY if they dont learn that they are a 'dunce' and get a lot of negative feelings about it all (just drawing on my own experience here with my daugher )

    Good luck I hope your little girl can find some good support and get on top of it all.

    Re being too young for tutoring - no definitely not - if you can go somewhere like Kip McGrath (prob depends on teh tutors in your local centre too) they are professional and know what they're doing - my daughter always enjoyed going. It's so expensive though.... But I think if you could intervene now you might only need a couple of semesters so it might be a case of pay a little now and save later.

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    I think that the others are right - definitely not too young to be tutored.

    I would also add that it might be a good idea to get her involved in an activity that she is really good at. Academic learning might not be her forte, but everyone is great at something. If she can find her strength early, she'll be less likely to have her confidence damaged if she doesn't perform brilliantly at school.

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    That is an extremely good point Cdro

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    I've had the same thought in regards to my step-daughter. What's people's opinions on the Kip McGrath centres??

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    Glutton - well I already commented but we had a very good experience - they get loads of postiive reinforcement, explain to you what's going on, very individual programs etc. You could track the progress - my daughter went from being several years below year level to on par in reading in about a year of tutoring. She then started on maths and had the same result.

    Sometimes you just need that help to catch up

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chew the Mintie View Post
    My daughter struggled terribly in Year 1. She was not kept back, but I wish she had been. Because she was behind, it just got worse every year until Year 5 when I took her out of the school (who'd refused to repeat her) and repeated her at another school.

    She then had a breather to catch up and started doing really well, came top band in a lot of her last naplan results etc.

    She went to Kip McGrath tutoring for about 4 years too, for help with reading (she was very delayed) and basic maths. The building blocks. If you get behind on these basic foundations it's just impossible for kids to go on to more advanced stuff as they dont have those basics to draw on.

    I guess I'd also really want to say that please dont take this as a reflection of yoru child's future ability or intelligence or effort.... some kids just take longer to mature in different areas and a child that struggles with reading in year 1 may be a bookworm 5 years later but ONLY if they dont learn that they are a 'dunce' and get a lot of negative feelings about it all (just drawing on my own experience here with my daugher )

    Good luck I hope your little girl can find some good support and get on top of it all.

    Re being too young for tutoring - no definitely not - if you can go somewhere like Kip McGrath (prob depends on teh tutors in your local centre too) they are professional and know what they're doing - my daughter always enjoyed going. It's so expensive though.... But I think if you could intervene now you might only need a couple of semesters so it might be a case of pay a little now and save later.
    How much did you pay for kip? I'm thinking of sending DD there is one about 15 min away from us.

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    I can send you some links with some good ideas for activities yiu can do at home. They are done in a fun way so she wont 'know' that she is learning. Also i can explain how to encourage her with her reading as well. Pm me if you like :-) I am a junior primary teacher so may have some ideas that can help you


 

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