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  1. #11
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    Michelle_N I think if you are ok with that stuff then that's fine.
    For me, I wrote a birth plan because I didn't the first time and it made me understand what type of birth experience I wanted. It won't always go to plan ofcourse, but it is more the ultimate, "if circumstances permit, this is what I'd prefer" It also means when I wasn't in a position to tell them what I wanted, the birth plan is there so they know.
    I didn't want a canula because I didn't want to be jabbed while I'm in a zone and the bloody thing is annoying.
    I didn't want constant monitoring because I don't believe it's necessary, I also wanted to use water while labouring and for a vbac they want you strapped in bed, so I wanted to be mobile and unrestricted.
    I didn't want internals because they're pointless, you can go from 2cm to 10cm in an hour, I knew my body will tell me when I was ready to push and thats exactly what happened.
    Basically I wanted to be left alone, I didn't want to have any little thing making me think there was something wrong, or the midwifes and dr's putting a time on me, so if I was getting constant internals and not dialating I'd have been off for a c/s iykwim? Some people can go into this going with the flow and not being bothered by it all, but I think when you've had a previous c/s you weren't happy with, planning and preperation helps in the mental preperation and if you feel your doing everything you can to avoid another c/s then you have to feel happy about that no matter the outcome.

  2. #12
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    I agree ^ my cs wasnt the birth i wanted so i was a lot more particular and 'strict' about what would and wouldnt accept.

    I wrote a birth plan and had a doula. I agreed to one internal on arrival and 10 minutes of monitoring. They never did an internal and had no subsequent monitoring until pushing stage. The canula never came up. They were all great about it and respected my wishes. I was stoked to say the least

    I had planned to labour at home as long as i could but felt a tad guilty when they said you better come in straight away as you're a vbac. Turned out by the time we got organised and dropped ds at my parents, i was at the hospy for about 2 hours or so which was ideal. I wish you the best of luck.

  3. #13
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    Michelle - I actually totally understand where you're coming from because though I knew I didn't want some things I had no idea what the fuss was about re refusing continuous fetal monitoring etc. It was only the other day that I did some reading on it. This is why I, personally, will refuse it.

    1) When you have an ultrasound there is a burst of radiation essentially, then a pause, then another burst etc. With electronic fetal monitoring it's constant, and it's (depending on the machine but on average) 200 times stronger than a normal ultrasound. I'm not anti ultrasound at all, I've needed quite a few this pregnancy, but there is evidence doubting their safety and even putting the baby at risk. So while I don't mind having a diagnostic one when necessary I'd rather not have hours on end of an ultrasound (in the form of fetal monitoring) at 200X the strength of normal.
    2) The evidence doesn't show that continuous fetal monitoring improves outcomes for mother or baby.
    3) If it's the kind of monitor where you're stuck in one spot it can hinder labour (though a lot of hospitals do have wireless versions where you can take them in the shower etc so it might be a good idea to ask if you're ok with having one)
    4) Though you're monitored continuously, there's not someone watching the results continuously. They will generally check the feed from the machine either every 20 minutes to every hour. So if it does pick up a problem they're not generally going to see it anyway until after the fact. It's basically done for legal reasons so that if there's ever a lawsuit the hospital can show they were doing it.
    5) I'm not sure what the circumstances of your previous c-secs were, but I know that when my son went into distress it was me who asked my husband to call the midwife to come and check his heartbeat because I knew something wasn't right. Apparently one of the problems of continuous monitoring is that it can be inaccurate, and the hospital is a lot more likely to ignore the mother if she says something feels wrong if the monitor is beeping along nicely.

    Don't get me wrong, I want to know my baby's doing ok in there. I would be very happy if a midwife came in with a doppler every twenty minutes and checked his heartbeat. And could see the point of continuous fetal monitoring if someone was staring at it the whole time. But with the above circumstances (and the huge amount of evidence showing it doesn't help things) it's not right for me.

    I recommend Ina May's guide to childbirth too. Great book

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    Hi Clucky

    I have no experience with VBAC but I do have experience in achieving the kind of birth that I want.
    My advice is just stand firm. Make your choices well known and don't accept anything other than what you want (unless there is a GOOD reason not to, of course!).

    And could I just make another suggestion... think carefully about when you want to go to hospital. Travelling in labour can be detrimental to progress. Maybe you are one of the women who won't be bothered by it, but I know I just couldn't do it -- so much so, that with this pregnancy (which will be my first hospital birth after 3 homebirths) I have made it part of my birth plan that I will be going to hospital as soon as I know that it's happening so that I can get to hospital and settle in long before I get to established labour and I have stipulated that there will be no time constraints on the labour. (After being told during my last pregnancy that I had a time limit of 12 hours to birth my baby once I got to hospital, if I chose to do it there.)
    (Happy to discuss the travelling thing further if you want.)

    Other than that... hope all keeps going well for you.

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    I just wanted to add I had a very perfect and amazing VBA2C 6 months ago and had CFM (wireless and water proof) and a Canula and neither inhibited my progress or labour.

    In fact I actually found the CFM quite reassuring in a way. It was so nice to see her regular steady heartbeat and it helped with my fears of uterine rupture as one of the first signs CAN be (among many things) increased heart rate.

    Good Luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by kbf2plus2 View Post
    And could I just make another suggestion... think carefully about when you want to go to hospital. Travelling in labour can be detrimental to progress. Maybe you are one of the women who won't be bothered by it, but I know I just couldn't do it -- so much so, that with this pregnancy (which will be my first hospital birth after 3 homebirths) I have made it part of my birth plan that I will be going to hospital as soon as I know that it's happening so that I can get to hospital and settle in long before I get to established labour and I have stipulated that there will be no time constraints on the labour. (After being told during my last pregnancy that I had a time limit of 12 hours to birth my baby once I got to hospital, if I chose to do it there.)
    (Happy to discuss the travelling thing further if you want.)
    I know travelling during labour is not ideal, but thankfully the hospital is only about 15 minutes away so it's not too much of a drive. I'm unsure of alternatives though. Ideally I'd love a homebirth but it's not right for me this time around for a number of reasons (maybe next time ).
    I also think that labouring at home will probably help my progress, because I can be totally comfortable in my own environment until things really get going. Hospitals are useful but I don't really like it there and after starting my labour there with DS after being induced I was keenly aware that I was in a hospital, not somewhere comfy and private, and I don't think that helped my progress either. I figure getting there when I'm more established my mind will be more on the job at hand so to speak. But yes, I am dreading that car ride there!

    Faroutbrusselsprout - thank you for sharing that. It's good to know that different things do work for different people. So glad for you that you got your awesome VBAC

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    Hi. I don't quite understand why one wouldn't want to be monitored during labour but each to their own I guess. My first ds's heart rate was dropping during labour and without the monitoring he probably wouldn't be here. Working in clinical risk I probably understand more but the staff and drs not only have a duty of care but also have protocols to follow.

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    Kimberly - A lot of people don't understand the choices others make during labour, and that's fine. This thread is seeking support of others who have made the same choices and asking what response they had from the medical staff when they discussed their choices. It's not really about debating if those choices are valid, because different things work for different people.

    If you read above though I actually listed why I personally am going to refuse continuous fetal monitoring during labour. I am in no way against being monitored, I want that very much, but evidence shows there are several ways to do that and I'm considering the use of the doppler regularly as opposed to the belly band for the reasons I listed. I understand that others make different choices and am very supportive of that. This thread is about getting support for my choices too

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    Quote Originally Posted by CluckySC View Post
    Kimberly - A lot of people don't understand the choices others make during labour, and that's fine. This thread is seeking support of others who have made the same choices and asking what response they had from the medical staff when they discussed their choices. It's not really about debating if those choices are valid, because different things work for different people.

    If you read above though I actually listed why I personally am going to refuse continuous fetal monitoring during labour. I am in no way against being monitored, I want that very much, but evidence shows there are several ways to do that and I'm considering the use of the doppler regularly as opposed to the belly band for the reasons I listed. I understand that others make different choices and am very supportive of that. This thread is about getting support for my choices too
    I hope you didn't find my post unhelpful as I fully support no CFM in vbac's.
    I just wanted to add that if you did find yourself in the situation that it was unavoidable for whatever reason that you could find a positive in it!
    I hope you are able to have your rights accepted on all accounts!!
    I know all about fighting for our VBAC rights! I refused to let anyone tell me my scar was "to thin" after 2 c-secs and demanded a 2nd opinion!

  10. #20
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    Oh not at all, I appreciate hearing your experience. Am also fortunate that the hospital I'm birthing at has the wireless waterproof monitors if I do need it, so was nice to hear from someone who used one. Though I plan to refuse monitoring (except Doppler) I would be very happy to have CFM if the Doppler was picking up any potential issues that had to be kept an eye on.
    It's just the trying to avoid medical scare tactics at the moment, which I find interesting as I had more chance of rupture in my first induced labour than in a vbac!

    Quote Originally Posted by faroutbrusselsprout View Post
    I hope you didn't find my post unhelpful as I fully support no CFM in vbac's.
    I just wanted to add that if you did find yourself in the situation that it was unavoidable for whatever reason that you could find a positive in it!
    I hope you are able to have your rights accepted on all accounts!!
    I know all about fighting for our VBAC rights! I refused to let anyone tell me my scar was "to thin" after 2 c-secs and demanded a 2nd opinion!


 

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