View Poll Results: Did you avoid alcohol while UTD but take drugs during labor?

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  • Yes, I avoided alcohol when UTD but took drugs during labor.

    36 52.94%
  • Nope, didn't touch either.

    32 47.06%
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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy in the Sky View Post
    Here is how the conversation about alcohol goes "Alcohol can have severe and permanent deterimental effects to your developing foetus. As it is a completely unnecessary recreational drug - don't drink"

    Here is how the conversation for a spinal tap goes. "Here are all the horrible things that could unlikely happen to you and your baby if we give you a caesarean... but if we don't give you one, you or your baby will definitely die. Enjoy the birth of your child."

    When a woman no longer has a choice (physically or emotionally) and the caregivers believe the drugs are necessary, why make a difficult situation impossible by pointing out every possible side effect of the drugs?

    The reason a different level of information is passed on for alcohol and labour drugs is that alcohol is unnecessary and something all women can easily obstain from when properly informed. Often labour drugs are necessary and unavoidable regardless of how much information is given.
    I was so scared going in for my emergency c-section. If the Ob had sat there and read me a text book list of every possible worst case scenario for drugs that I had no choice in taking, it would have caused emotional birth trauma that would have taken WAY longer to heal than any minor side effects of the spinal tap to me and my child.
    I'm having a general for my csection because of a complete anterior placenta previa. A spinal could kill me. I know what it means to not have a choice!

    But I felt as my sons mother it was important to know exactly what potentional danger I am exposing him too so I have researched ALL the risks and benefits.

    Not once has an OB mentioned any potentional risks to me and my son other then why I can't have a spinal, and once they mentioned a higher level of post op pain for me. That is it. It was up to me to inform myself.

  2. #102
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    It's not always a CHOICE. (as in big Capitol letters, CHOICE) there's so much more to it than it just being a CHOICE.

    When your labour is being handled by people who have zero compassion, understanding, competency or trust in your body, who don't know about (or care about) natural ways of comforting labouring women, it stops being a choice.

    I asked to sit in the bath. I came with a goodie bag of natural pain relief. But I was told 'maybe later' to the bath and nobody actually opened my bag (including my DP) to actually try and take the edge off. Meanwhile I had the Syntocinon drip pushed up and up, while offering me pain relief over and over.

    Okay, it was a choice, but not a CHOICE. I could have chosen a lot of things. But my frame of mind to make choices just wasnt there.

    And I do absolutely think had I had better care, I wouldn't have needed drugs. (well, I may have still had a csection, i don't know if I could have delivered Jasper breech)

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  4. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by SorenLorensen View Post
    I dont drink during pregnancy but then again i dont drink much anyways so it is no big deal for me not to.

    I had an epi with DD1, i found it really numbed the feeling of the knife being put through my abdomen....worked a treat i tell you
    DD2 i went with the spinal and golly be gosh that was just as good as the epi
    LOL!


    I was admitted to maternity already 1.5 week before I gave birth via an unplanned planned cesarean. I was glad I was already in hospital, as the midwives organized for the anesthetist to come and talk to me about the 3 kinds of anesthetics they have available during a c/s.
    I was well informed by him and chose to have a spinal over an epi and ofcourse over being knocked out completely.
    Because I made a well informed decisions, it made the whole cesarean process less stressful for me.
    When the moment was there, I was sitting relaxed on the edge of the operation table while the anesthetist did what he did.
    I couldn't see what he was doing as he was standing behind me. Yet he told me exactly what he was doing with each step and if whatever he was doing, would harm DS.
    I didn't even feel the needle go in, which is what I feared the most. The whole thing was very relaxed and friendly. The OB was making a few jokes and the midwife was sitting behind me, talking to me about what my first words would be to DS and how nice it would be to give him his very first cuddle.
    Because of this, I felt at ease during the whole operation. This made it possible for the OB to concentrate on what he was doing and he tried a new way of stitching to ensure less scarring and quicker healing. He did a great job. No wonder he's considered to be the best OB in our area.

    I do not regret choosing a spinal.
    I dont think I'll be able to have more kids, but if another miracle happens, I will try my hardest to have a VBAC. If that fails, I will choose to have a spinal again.

    I feel sorry for you ladies who have not been (well) informed about your choices and the effects it can have on you and your bubs.
    I guess every situation, hospital and midwife is different.
    I insisted on speaking to the anesthetist, even though the midwife explained some of the options and risks to me.
    She said it was my body and my child and yes I have the right to speak to the people who would be there during the procedure, to make sure Im doing the right thing.

    (I didn't really think I would actually speak to an anesthetist as they're very busy people, so I was quite surprised when he walked into my room.
    Public hospitals aren't as bad as I used to think).

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    Hootenanny  (02-01-2011)

  6. #104
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    I had a lovely anesthetist. She was really nice. She smiled and asked me how I was feeling (okay, sure, asking how I was feeling, or not feeling, kinda her job, but she made me feel acknowledged)

  7. #105
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    I feel so disheartened that I support so many birth choices and I'm absolutely disgusted that supporting birth choices seems to only extend to one group.

    If I compared homebirth to alcohol during pregnancy I would be absolutely torn to shreds and there's many medical associations that say that homebirth is "too risky".

    Women are not airheads who cannot make their own decisions because they choose or needs drugs during labour. We're not dumb.

    There's risks with any drug during any procedure. I don't accuse people of being "uninformed" or "ignorant" because they don't take hypnotherapy during medical procedures it drives me nuts that because a woman is pregnant/labouring she's public property and subjected to public scrutiny.

    I will no longer support birth choices if mine aren't supported too.

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    BlissedOut  (02-01-2011)

  9. #106
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    Benji - there is a difference between a choice and an informed choice though. That doesn't mean someone isnt entitled to making a choice, informed or not, but I, like the OP find it strange that women inform themselves of the risks of everything they do during pregnancy but not what they do during labour.

    I've also mentioned it's not all on the woman for not being informed, as many women as about the risks involved with procedures and basically get told the risks of NOT doing it and the benefits of doing it. It took a lot of probing to get anyone to tell me the risks of having a general for my csection, lots of OBs were willing to tell me the risks of not having a general and how a general will stop me from bleeding out etc etc but wouldn't directly tell me the risks associated with a general iykwim.

    I support women in their choices and I also support open dialogue about these choices.

  10. #107
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    I went into my first birth fairly naive, I had complete faith in my body that it would do what it was supposed to do and was so smug I didn't go to the antenatal class on csections because I wouldn't need it. Well as I approached 42 weeks with not a twinge or single sign of labour things changed and I was induced and eventually had a cs. I had no idea about the choices I was making because I had chosen to ignore them, I was told about the risks of GA etc but when you are concerned for your baby's life you do what you have to. With my 2nd I was prepared to have him at home, I was well researched, knew ALL of my options and risks etc but still ultimately ended up with the same outcome. induced past 42 weeks and cs, the only difference was I had a spinal as opposed to a ga and laid off the pethidine. SO I guess my point is you can have all the knowledge and will in the world and it doesn't mean much when your child's life is at stake, you make the best decision for them.

    Quote Originally Posted by SleeplessBeauty View Post
    .

    When your labour is being handled by people who have zero compassion, understanding, competency or trust in your body, who don't know about (or care about) natural ways of comforting labouring women, it stops being a choice.
    Whilst I agree with most of what you wrote in the rest of the post I think this part is a bit harsh, the majority of people I have encountered at hospitals are there because they are good people who want to help others, I know many midwives who advocate more 'natural' methods of helping birth along (even if they sometimes do it 'quietly') and even the aneathetist (shock horror ) was amazing at our local public hospital. He took time to talk to me about all my concerns during prenatal visits (even though I insisted I wouldn't be needing him) and was wonderful in theatre, I actually spent most of the time chatting with him and when ds2 was born he was the one who told them to give ds straight to me. I think more often the not the issues are with hospital policy and those in positions of power who make all the 'choices' that then impact on your experience.

  11. #108
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    Theophania is offline 'see what had happened was..there were these three ninjas and a blue monkey and well it really wasn't my fault..'
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttermilk View Post
    Are you actually reading what people are writing? Your being completely ignorant and I think you are downplaying labour to try and get a fruitless point across.
    As for your 2nd post, it is also your responsibility to read up on the effects of drugs during labour, and you are offered alot of information at your hospital appointments prior to your labour. You can't expect the hospital to inform you of all the risks during labour because at that point if you need a c/s, the risks of drugs far out weigh the risks of not having a c/s?
    Yes I am reading what people are writing, and what I am reading is alot of defensive comments from people who have used drugs in labor. I am not judging them, I too used every drug available to me throughout my sons labor, and that is something I have to live with now. It lead to the cascade of intervention and then an emergency cesarean, I now know the dangers of taking drugs in labor. You are right, I was not informed, I trusted that the hospital had my best interest at heart, I thought they would take care of me and inform me along the way of things that may be needed. How wrong I was! Instead I was lied to about potential risks and bullied into doing things 'their way'. Yes my fault also to some extent, and I will never deny that. I am most certainly not playing down labor to 'get my point across'. As far as I am concerned it is important to get this info out there. If I can help just one person who is as trusting of the medical profession as I was then I will be happy. Some women don't understand that the hospital doesn't alway know 'whats best' but go into birth trusting them and then so many times have that trust violated. So I am sorry if I seem to be comming across as a bit passionate and full on with this subject but it is something that is very important to me.

    I have tried not to go off topic too much, so OP I am sorry about the above post... BUt I felt the need to explain myself. I am not judging women at all I have never said anyone was stupid or ignorant for using drugs throughout labor, I am merely stating the fact that both drinking during pregnancy and taking drugs throughout labor come with risks!!! Although some people want to pick and take what they choose from my post to make me seem unsupportive of womens choice. I am most certainly not unsupportive, I will support women in any choice they make but I am not going to sit here and pretend there aren't dangers involved...
    Last edited by Theophania; 02-01-2011 at 08:17.

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  13. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by luvmyboys View Post
    Whilst I agree with most of what you wrote in the rest of the post I think this part is a bit harsh, the majority of people I have encountered at hospitals are there because they are good people who want to help others, I know many midwives who advocate more 'natural' methods of helping birth along (even if they sometimes do it 'quietly') and even the aneathetist (shock horror ) was amazing at our local public hospital. He took time to talk to me about all my concerns during prenatal visits (even though I insisted I wouldn't be needing him) and was wonderful in theatre, I actually spent most of the time chatting with him and when ds2 was born he was the one who told them to give ds straight to me. I think more often the not the issues are with hospital policy and those in positions of power who make all the 'choices' that then impact on your experience.
    I've been in hospital for 5 weeks now (had a total of 6 days at home in the last 5 weeks) and I've seen my fair share of midwives in that time. I've seen some excellent ones, yesterday one sat with me for 2 hours while I had a bleed caused my placenta previa. She held my hand while I had several needles, I have a needle phobia and she commented afterwards that she was impressed with my courage during me needles. She hugged my while I cried, she distracted me with great conversation, made me laugh and made the whole thing so much easier.

    In the same hospital I've had a midwife pull down my pants to check my pad without asking me first, I felt completely violated. There's also a midwife who is only on nights, she insists on waking me to tell me the shift has changed, gets huffy if I ask her not to perform OBs (last night she wanted to get a fetal heart rate even though I had been on ctg all afternoon). I mentioned last night after she woke me that I was tired and just wanted to go back to sleep, her response was "let me get you some pain killers and sleeping tablets then". For what? I would have still been sleeping if she hadn't walked in turning on all the lights and pulling the covers back!

    Not all midwives are bad, but not all midwives are wonderful either.

  14. #110
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    I probably was a bit harsh. But they did induced me with an undiagnosed breech for 45 hours, and that wasn't really the *worst* thing that happened. It was their general additude and disregard for my opinion about my own body or baby. I really could go on and on but there's a half dozen things they did that I feel was worse than the horrible error of inducing me for so long with a breech.

    But I don't think they were cruel. I think they were thoughtless.
    Last edited by Boobycino; 02-01-2011 at 08:28.


 

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