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  1. #1
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    Default Paed recommended against testing for giftedness

    I took my ds to his paed appt today and he recommended against testing for giftedness as a preschooler. He said that if he is in the gifted category he is labelled as such and in primary school (especially the early years) it's not so helpful. And if he just falls short of the line of giftedness the teachers then just say "he's smart, ok, but not extra special so we'll treat him the same as other kids & not push him" and then he'll not be pushed and potentially get frustrated and bored & then become behavioural.

    Instead he just recommended as much stimulation intellectually as possible including trips to the zoo, museum, planetarium, etc and good interaction with his teachers at school to make sure he's encouraged in his areas of interest.

    But overall he said that social development of gifted children is really important and that is the school's role to help with that. As parents out of school hours we can promote further intellectual stimulation, but he'll really need the social interaction that school will provide, probably more than what he'll learn at school.

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    I tend to agree, my brother got a lot more out of my Mum's help than the general school stuff, at least until he was in an O.C class and had one particular teacher before that, who was the other who specialised in advanced students at the school

    How are you feeling about that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mim1 View Post
    I took my ds to his paed appt today and he recommended against testing for giftedness as a preschooler. He said that if he is in the gifted category he is labelled as such and in primary school (especially the early years) it's not so helpful. And if he just falls short of the line of giftedness the teachers then just say "he's smart, ok, but not extra special so we'll treat him the same as other kids & not push him" and then he'll not be pushed and potentially get frustrated and bored & then become behavioural.

    Instead he just recommended as much stimulation intellectually as possible including trips to the zoo, museum, planetarium, etc and good interaction with his teachers at school to make sure he's encouraged in his areas of interest.

    But overall he said that social development of gifted children is really important and that is the school's role to help with that. As parents out of school hours we can promote further intellectual stimulation, but he'll really need the social interaction that school will provide, probably more than what he'll learn at school.
    100% agree...this is what i do with DS

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    It's what we do already in terms of how to stimulate him. I feel better after going to a kinder (ELC) interview yesterday and having the principal notice very quickly that my ds had advanced language. I suppose my concern was making sure that the teachers realised, as I don't feel that his childcare notice or try to extend him in any way. I think he'll be happy at this ELC next year and I'll just relax and enjoy the ride.

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    I understand why people test their kids - to know what level they are at and sometimes look at early entry to school.

    However it's just a number. Despite what some teachers and paeds say, we know our children best. If you know he's gifted (as I know my eldest is) that's all that matters.

    A good teacher will pick it up anyway. DD is only in 2nd term kinder but as I said in your other thread, she's finding the home readers too easy. Then today DD brings home a lev 3 home reader (which was still too easy for her ) and said her teacher had be listening to her read and felt it was time to go up a couple of levels. I'm hoping by the end of term she'll be put on lev 5.

    Since your child is off to school next year, look at reading, writing and maths or anything he knows an interest in. Then hopefully next year his teacher will pick up his talents

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    Was he a specialist in education or more importantly gifted education?

    I'm not sure that as a paediatrician he qualifies. It definitely isn't his area of expertise and just from his comments alone...well, I'd be getting a second opinion (from someone who is qualified). The myths surrounding gifted kids and social and emotional development are rife - and false.

    Children learn their learning habits early. Gifted children who aren't challenged in the early years can turn into classic underachievers - cruising through those early years, hitting high-school and hitting a big wall. Suddenly they are required to apply themselves and have never learned how. It is very hard to turn around.

    The out of school stuff only lasts so long. After all, they aren't just gifted after school, or for an hour pull-out program twice a week - they are gifted all of the time.

    Someone once described gifted learners to me as kids with special needs - they certainly are. And they don't need to be labelled - just recognised and catered for.

    My child hasn't had any negative issues at school regarding his giftedness, nor the measures that have been taken to accommodate him. He was tested - the achievement tests really gave us an insight into where he was educationally and what he needed.

    The IQ is just a number - but a number that determined where he was on the scale and gave an inkling of what he could achieve, given the right approach.

    I also know many parents of gifted children who manage very well without the testing. It really depends on the child and how they present themselves. Nobody suggested my child was gifted - a couple of teachers eluded to it (I now see in hindsight). It wasn't until he was tested that the pieces fell together.

    He spent the first 3 years of his school life (pre-identification) feeling very different to everyone around him and working very hard to fit in. He is now extremely happy - the number one goal of any parent.

    The most important thing to remember is it doesn't define your child. It is just part of his make-up.

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    I've decided to get him tested. I spoke to my dh and he mentioned that he was the same as our ds - a real chatterbox with advanced language from early on. Then during his kinder year (maybe as late as 6 months in) my MIL went to a parent teacher interview and the conversation went like this:

    teacher: Now, about his language ...
    MIL: Yeah, it's impossible to stop him talking isn't it?
    Teacher: really, he doesn't talk at kinder!

    Of course testing won't solve this problem, communication in general will, but I'm very much leaning towards ignoring the paed and going for testing.

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    I've recently decided to have my nearly 5yo tested. Her teacher (she's in the 4yo group at a Montessori school) has recognised and accommodated her brilliantly for the past 18 months, BUT is starting to run out of tricks, basically.

    Testing gives her teacher a tool to work with - it identifies where she can be expected to achieve well over the norm, where she might be closer to the norm, and where she might even be under the norm. It gives concrete support to all her observations about how DD1 learns and takes stuff onboard, and how she NEEDS extra support (materials, people, whatever) to be able to facilitate that learning.

    Its as frustrating for my daughter's teacher as it is for me that children diagnosed with "special needs" ie a learning disability of some description are able to receive additional support in calss, but there is nothing for a child who is a long way ahead of the others, and channels all her gifts at being disruptive when bored. Without a gifted diagnosis, and possibly without Montessori, my daughter would be just another loud, mouthy, disruptive kid who likes to read.

    (Or, as happened at occasional care before she started Montessori "she never looks at the books." Because my daughter had 'looked' at them all before, learnt to read while you weren't paying attention, read them, and moved on.)

    The important thing about testing is to make sure it is actually answering specific questions and the report will meet some specific goals - ie helping out at school, ensuring your sons abilities are fully explored.

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I understand why people test their kids - to know what level they are at and sometimes look at early entry to school.

    However it's just a number. Despite what some teachers and paeds say, we know our children best. If you know he's gifted (as I know my eldest is) that's all that matters.

    A good teacher will pick it up anyway. DD is only in 2nd term kinder but as I said in your other thread, she's finding the home readers too easy. Then today DD brings home a lev 3 home reader (which was still too easy for her ) and said her teacher had be listening to her read and felt it was time to go up a couple of levels. I'm hoping by the end of term she'll be put on lev 5.

    Since your child is off to school next year, look at reading, writing and maths or anything he knows an interest in. Then hopefully next year his teacher will pick up his talents
    i think if you find a good school, and a good kindi teacher, then it will be picked up and fostered there. socially how is he at kindi?

    when it comes down to it though, you know the best answer yourself. go with your gut

  10. #10
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    Hi,


    I know this is older thread but was just wondering how the OP went?

    DId you get your DS tested?

    What do you want to happen for your son? How do you plan to use the info you get?


 

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