+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9,134
    Thanks
    3,607
    Thanked
    2,360
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts

    Default Wanting To Breastfeed - But Freaked Out By It.

    Hi all

    I never breastfed last time and I am planning on doing so this time, in a way I am absolutely excited about the thought of breastfeeding and love the idea of it but at the same time, the whole idea of it freaks me out...I'm not sure if this is normal or not?

    Breastfeeding appeals to me because I love the idea of naturally bonding with bubby this way. I've also read/heard how beneficial breast milk is for little ones plus another big plus factor is that it's free!

    Breastfeeding "freaks" me out for the following reasons...this is basically what scares me...I have the following questions:

    1) I'm squeamish. Very, very squeamish. The idea of sore, bleeding, cracked nipples just makes me feel really sick. The idea of my nipples being horribly sore and bloody honestly makes me cringe I know this doesn't happen to everyone but what if it does?? Is there ANY way to avoid this from happening in the first place...can using nipple shields straight up prevent this happening? Should I invest in some nipple creams before I even have my son?

    2) If I don't take to breastfeeding well - will expressing milk with my electric breast pump (I ended up getting one) be OK instead? and if I find breastfeeding too painful...will expressing this way be any less painful than having bub suck on my nipple??

    3) I have asked my ob about my smoking (terrible habit I can't seem to break) and breastfeeding. He told me that even though I smoke I should not let this put me off breastfeeding as it's still worth doing if I can. Obviously I'd never smoke around my baby and never, ever during breastfeeding..but how long after I've had a cigarette should I wait until I breastfeed? If anyone here breastfeeds and smokes I'd love your input.

    4) I don't have issues with breastfeeding around my hubby, family or best friends...but the idea of breastfeeding in front of my in-laws and in front of strangers kind of makes me feel uncomfortable. Is this something you just get used to over time? I have read a thread here about breastfeeding in public and found it helpful, but what if you're uncomfortable around certain people (ie in-laws)?

    Sorry for all the questions but I've done so much reading/research on this issue and I'd really rather hear from women who've actually been there

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    7,723
    Thanks
    415
    Thanked
    680
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    1) I was terrified of nipple damage after seeing what happened to my sister with breastfeeding. I had terrible nipple damage in those first couple of weeks, but breastfeeding was very important to me and my baby and I persevered. The best ting for me was buying a breast pump and bottle feeding EBM on and off until my nipples healed.

    2) Expressing was far less painful for me, but as soon as my nipples could take it I breastfed again but would switch for a few weeks as one nipple had worse damage than the other, so feed from one and pump the other. It was all better by 3 weeks I think and we just breastfed from then on. You never get quite as much milk from expressing.

    3) I think the ABA has guidelines on this you could search for, but I think they advise to not smoke for an hour before feeding.

    4) I was quite awkward about it to start with but got very relaxed with it, and now breastfeed my 20 month old in front of anyone if I have to.

    Also, I think seeing a lactation consultant played a huge part in my going on to successfully and comfortably feed my DD. My hospital offered a few free visits in the first month which I'm so glad I took advantage of. Just wish I'd seen the LC the day I had DD rather than after a week of agony.



    Good luck, there's always great support here and from the ABA.
    Last edited by bada; 18-01-2010 at 01:20.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    999
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    8
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    yep get access to a LC, surround yourself with good support. watch videos on attachment. be prepared to hear that P word - perseverance. you need to read up and understand how breastfeeding works.

    it can be really hard, but you know, and i am proof, if you want to stick with it it is soooo rewarding for the reasons you have mentioned.

    i bf dd till 17 months (interupted by pregnancy) and even though i got that far, i still worry how bf will go with this baby.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    6,371
    Thanks
    422
    Thanked
    1,164
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    i never had cracked nipples or anything sorry and not a smoker..

    but i do understand that there can be some fear about feeding in front of particular people. for me.. it wasn't about feeding in front of strangers.. but particularly.. male strangers around my age.. cos lets face it.. nineteen year old guys are idiots usually.. and also about feeding in front of my FIL... and also one particular friend who can't even talk about boobs without blushing...

    my advice is to bring a little wrap and drape it over your shoulder and invest in some really good breeasteeding clothes.. bras and the little tops with over laying parts.. it makes it a lot easier. at times e.g. at your in laws, you can easily excuse yourself and go and sit in say the spare room to feed... if it seems odd to leave, just be brave and stay! it will be ok. most people have seen somebody breastfeed before. MY FIL used to excuse himself lol.. so he obviously thought i needed some privacy..

    when you first start BF it can feel very unnatural and awkward and you may not have the confidence to whip out a breast at the shops.. but you do develop good skills at that and yes, like you asked, the fear goes with time

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,066
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked
    14
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    I had all of the above issues before and after I had DD and it took about a month of feeding to get the hang of it. I would persist with it even through the cracked nipples and embarrassing feelings.

    You can put a lighweight muslin over your boobs to cover them but believe me, you will get over it by about month 2 and get them ou in front of whoever. People tend to look away when you say you needtofeed and start unclipping your bra...especially dads and brothers

    I think its best to not take up smoking again after the baby is born. I was a 20 a day smoker whe DD was conceived and stopped for the pregnancy only to take it up again casually after she was born due to stress from being a single parent at the time ect. If I was wanting to smoke Id have one after feeding and she had fallen asleep. This way I knew she wouldnt wake for about 3 hours and the crap would be out of my system. I only did this occasionally and not a full-time thing. Its not advisable though and the smell even after having a smoke is dangerous so you would have to brush teeth, wash hands, change clothes...its just a hassle and (to me) not worth it. Its bad to smoke even if bottle feeding because of the after-smells.

    With the attatchment and cracked nipples I really didnt get the hang of it when meeting with the lactation consultant and only 'clicked' on how to properly attach and detatch the baby when I watched a video of someone else doing it. Then I fed my DD until she was 3 years old with no problems.

    Good luck

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,800
    Thanks
    882
    Thanked
    456
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    1.) I didn't get any cracked or bleeding nipples. This can be avoided straight up by correct attachment. If you are having trouble with attachment seek help asap to lessen any damage to your nipples.
    2.) Expressing is ok but its very time consuming and its not the same stimulation as the baby sucking. I actually found it more painful to express.
    3.) Smoking. I'm not a smoker so i don't have personal experience, But i'd wear a smoking jacket and come in and wash my hands and perhaps even rinse out my mouth. I wouldn't not feed becuase i'd had a smoke just becuase in the very early days some babies need to feed quite regularly and this helps to build up your supply.
    4.) i was uncomfortable at first feeding around certain people and would either not feed DS or i'd just ask them to leave the room, or i'd go into another room. I wish i'd not not fed him cos this affected my milk supply. I started wearing a singlet under my tops so i'd pull my bra and singlet down and the top on the outside up so not much was exposed.
    Good luck and i hope that helps!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,103
    Thanks
    25
    Thanked
    236
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Hiya - good on you for being willing to give it a go, and for acknowleding what your hurdles are!

    1) I'm squeamish. Very, very squeamish. The idea of sore, bleeding, cracked nipples just makes me feel really sick. The idea of my nipples being horribly sore and bloody honestly makes me cringe I know this doesn't happen to everyone but what if it does?? Is there ANY way to avoid this from happening in the first place...can using nipple shields straight up prevent this happening? Should I invest in some nipple creams before I even have my son?

    Attachment attachment attachment - good positioning and attachment will in most cases prevent sore/crackd nipples in the first place. Get your midwife to watch and help you at EVERY feed until you are happy it is correct. You'll know it is correct because feeding WILL NOT hurt, except slightly when you first put baby on. See if you can find a good book with a diagram (breastfeeding naturally through ABA is a good one). No, nipple sheilds do not help prevent cracked nipples - they are for inverted nipples, and baby will learn to attach through the sheild and you may find it hard to put him/her directly to the breast. If your nipples feel sore, express some hind milk after a feed and leave them to air; and start your feeds on the less sore side first. BF naturally has a section on first aid for sore or cracked nipples, but remember if you get it right from the beginning you shouldnt have a problem at all.

    2) If I don't take to breastfeeding well - will expressing milk with my electric breast pump (I ended up getting one) be OK instead? and if I find breastfeeding too painful...will expressing this way be any less painful than having bub suck on my nipple??

    Yes you can do this - (my SIL did it for 8 months), but it is pretty inconvenient and time consuming. Some say expressing is less painful for sore nips, others say it is worse; and like someone said it doesnt stimulate your supply as much as a feeding baby so sometimes this can be a consideration too

    3) I have asked my ob about my smoking (terrible habit I can't seem to break) and breastfeeding. He told me that even though I smoke I should not let this put me off breastfeeding as it's still worth doing if I can. Obviously I'd never smoke around my baby and never, ever during breastfeeding..but how long after I've had a cigarette should I wait until I breastfeed? If anyone here breastfeeds and smokes I'd love your input.

    I think the wait time is 1 hr after a smoke, but like someone said newborns can feed every 1-2hrs so in the early days its better to just feed whenever you have to, regardless of how long its been since you had a smoke


    4) I don't have issues with breastfeeding around my hubby, family or best friends...but the idea of breastfeeding in front of my in-laws and in front of strangers kind of makes me feel uncomfortable. Is this something you just get used to over time? I have read a thread here about breastfeeding in public and found it helpful, but what if you're uncomfortable around certain people (ie in-laws)?

    I am the same. I have set up a really comfortable chair in the nursery and plan to feed there at home when we have visitors. If we are at someone elses house, I'll ask to use a bedroom and do it lying on my side in the room. If out and no feeding room available, I have bought some wraps to cover up, and also some of those bonds singlets others have mentioned so that you can lift up your outer shirt without exposing tummy or very much boob at all. I actually never got used to it with DD1, I just felt shy, and thats ok - I just took steps to do it discretely or in another room whenever I could. Others say that they got used to it over time so everyones different.

    Good luck with it all!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9,134
    Thanks
    3,607
    Thanked
    2,360
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Thank you, Thank you, THANK YOU

    I just read every single response and every single one of them is extremely helpful and very informative, hats off to you ladies!! I am already feeling much more relaxed about this - especially my first point (being afraid of sore/cracked nipples)...I will absolutely be making the most of the midwives at the hospital to make sure that attachment is correct and that bubby is latched on properly.

    Also thank you so much for suggestions about breastfeeding in front of people I'm uncomfortable with - I will invest in some good breastfeeding tops for sure. Are these generally sold in the maternity section or in the normal clothing sections of stores? I ask because I've never actually gone and looked at tops specifically designed for breastfeeding. Are the basic tops inexpensive...anyone know a rough price per top?

    Looking into some videos on breastfeeding now on Youtube

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,800
    Thanks
    882
    Thanked
    456
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkvanillaz View Post
    Also thank you so much for suggestions about breastfeeding in front of people I'm uncomfortable with - I will invest in some good breastfeeding tops for sure. Are these generally sold in the maternity section or in the normal clothing sections of stores? I ask because I've never actually gone and looked at tops specifically designed for breastfeeding. Are the basic tops inexpensive...anyone know a rough price per top?
    i just use a normal top and singlet. i wouldn't buy anything special until bub arrives and you have more experience with what you'll need. specific tops etc are just overpriced and i find not practicable. Try this: put on your bra, then a singlet and another top. Then unclip your bra, pull your singlet and bra cup down so your breast is out, then pull up your outer top. then (using a doll or a teddy bear) attach and cuddle your baby! i highly recommend attending a breastfeeding education class run by the australian breastfeeding association and practice attaching and holding with a doll or teddy. I've found breastfeeding to be a lovely experience (i've had my fair share of troubles too) and i'm so glad i persevered and stuck it out cos its so nice to have moments through the day where my DS and I just stop and reconnect through our BF's.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,819
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked
    18
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Congrats on your pending arrival and great news you are thinking about BF. I'll answer your questions and then do a bit at the end if I have some time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkvanillaz View Post
    1) I'm squeamish. Very, very squeamish. The idea of sore, bleeding, cracked nipples just makes me feel really sick. The idea of my nipples being horribly sore and bloody honestly makes me cringe I know this doesn't happen to everyone but what if it does?? Is there ANY way to avoid this from happening in the first place...can using nipple shields straight up prevent this happening? Should I invest in some nipple creams before I even have my son?
    Yes it can hurt. Even if your attachment is excellent, sometimes your breasts may just ache for a while. But if you're very careful with your attachment every single time you feed, any pain won't last long.

    I didn't have a great start this time and by 3 weeks I was well on the way to being settled and pain free and by 6 weeks I was a complete pain free pro!

    Nipple creams did nothing for me except gave me nipple thrush but i know of many who swear by them.

    Nipple shields are great if you need them but only if tou need them. The 24 mm (large) Medela shields were my saviour oth times but they can interfere with your supply and should only be used if it's the choice between shields and quitting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkvanillaz View Post
    2) If I don't take to breastfeeding well - will expressing milk with my electric breast pump (I ended up getting one) be OK instead? and if I find breastfeeding too painful...will expressing this way be any less painful than having bub suck on my nipple??
    Expressing can be good to rest your nipples and allow them to heal if they get damaged. But don't start off that way.

    If oyu do get grazes/cracks, a 24 hour rest and express will do wonders. However you might like to look at finger/cup/syringe feeding so bubus doesn;t get on a teat and refuse to go back to the breast.

    However start with the intention of having baby too the breast and know you have a great back up in expressng if you have unedurable pain.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkvanillaz View Post
    3) I have asked my ob about my smoking (terrible habit I can't seem to break) and breastfeeding. He told me that even though I smoke I should not let this put me off breastfeeding as it's still worth doing if I can. Obviously I'd never smoke around my baby and never, ever during breastfeeding..but how long after I've had a cigarette should I wait until I breastfeed? If anyone here breastfeeds and smokes I'd love your input.
    You're still going to smoke whether you BF or FF right? Well BF will provide some protection for yoour baby against the slightly increased SIDS risk from you smoking.

    If you FF bubs will still get the snoke through your clothes and hands. So BF is a great decision!

    Try and smoke straight after you BF and wear a smoking jacket that you take off. Smoke outside and leave bubs inside, wear the smoking jacket or shirt and take that off and wash your hands before you handle your baby.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkvanillaz View Post
    4) I don't have issues with breastfeeding around my hubby, family or best friends...but the idea of breastfeeding in front of my in-laws and in front of strangers kind of makes me feel uncomfortable. Is this something you just get used to over time? I have read a thread here about breastfeeding in public and found it helpful, but what if you're uncomfortable around certain people (ie in-laws)?
    I still don't love feeding in front of people but I am too lazy to care anymore. You may get over it and if not, just throw a muslin over your shoulder. They come in handy for milk pukes too

    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkvanillaz View Post
    Sorry for all the questions but I've done so much reading/research on this issue and I'd really rather hear from women who've actually been there
    Don't apologise - you're making a wonderful commitment to your child. Asking questions is a great way to ensure success.

    If I can give you a few tips:

    * trust yourself, your body and your baby. Just keep bubs to the breast and you WILL make enough milk

    * any pain you feel is finite - it will end soon. Just keep going.

    * get help from a lactation consultant (LC) from the beginning. LC's are great and will help with attachment.

    * google attachment and check out what good attachment looks like. Try and ifnd videos of women with similar breast/nipple sizes and shapes to youand see how they do it.

    * doon't listen to every single midwife. Pick one or 2 and stick with wat they tell you.

    * take you top off in hospital and just have skin to skin with your baby.

    *enjoy yourself! BF a baby is the m0st beautiful thing I have ever done. The bond is different for me to the one I had with my FF baby and it's so easy and convenient. And free. And you never have to warm it up. And you never run out.

    And please, make sure you come in here and talk to us if you strike trouble. You are never alone in your journey.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-07-2012, 17:12
  2. Pregnant and have a 4 month old and am a little freaked out!
    By Harliben in forum Pregnancy & Birth General Chat
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 25-05-2012, 20:04
  3. Clairvoint reading.... has freaked me out...
    By spitthedummy in forum Religion / Spirituality
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 25-02-2012, 14:42

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

FEATURED SUPPORTER
Prams and StrollersLooking to buy a pram or stroller? :: Viewer reviews of prams :: Pram Buyers ...