+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 45
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,783
    Thanks
    134
    Thanked
    75
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Question Baby's First Year: What is REALLY important??

    We often pit aspects of an issue against one another (breast vs bottle, work vs SAHM etc) but I'd be interested to see how people see these issues in comparison to one another.

    What do you think is most important for babies overall wellbeing in the first 12 months? What is the least important?

    * Socialization with other babies
    * Sleeping through the night
    * Being comforted when distressed
    * Breastmilk as the main source of nutrition
    * Having a fulltime stay-at-home mum
    * Only being offered totally fresh food (no baby food cans)
    * Having a happy, confident mum
    * Wearing cloth nappies
    * Access to a variety of developmentally appropriate toys
    * Learning to self-settle

    Reorder this list according to importance to an infant's wellbeing. (1st being most important and 10th being least important for a baby's wellbeing).

    I'm interested to reading everyone's responses and seeing what people regard as the most & least important...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    1,718
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    2
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    * Being comforted when distressed
    * Having a happy, confident mum
    * Breastmilk as the main source of nutrition
    * Only being offered totally fresh food (no baby food cans)
    * Having a fulltime stay-at-home mum
    * Socialization with other babies
    * Sleeping through the night
    * Learning to self-settle
    * Wearing cloth nappies
    * Access to a variety of developmentally appropriate toys

    This would be my list if it were an ideal world and everyone could breastfeed and be a stay at home mum.
    And keeping in that this list is for the infants well-being.

    I might need to re-order it if mum's happiness and confidence were affected by baby not self settling or sleeping through the night. But my bubs pretty easy so that affects the order of my list.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    10,609
    Thanks
    404
    Thanked
    1,920
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Being comforted when distressed, without any hesitation.

    Then breastfeeding.

    I think limiting it to a stay-at-home mum is unfair. It should be a stay-at-home parent. I think consistent care is important for healthy attachment. The only benefit of that person being the mother, is that the mother has boobs. Otherwise, a father can fill the role.

    I would rank sleeping through the night, self settling and cloth nappies as equal last. I say that as an enthusiastic user of cloth nappies - but I use them for the benefit of the environment, not my baby.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    0
    Reviews
    0
    Hey Wifey!!

    Mine, most important to least important:

    1 Being comforted when distressed
    2 Having a fulltime stay-at-home mum
    3 Having a happy, confident mum
    4 Access to a variety of developmentally appropriate toys
    5 Learning to self-settle
    6 Sleeping through the night
    7 Breastmilk as the main source of nutrition
    8 Only being offered totally fresh food (no baby food cans)
    9 Socialization with other babies
    10 Wearing cloth nappies

    MWAH!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,783
    Thanks
    134
    Thanked
    75
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by MsMummy View Post

    I think limiting it to a stay-at-home mum is unfair. It should be a stay-at-home parent. I think consistent care is important for healthy attachment. The only benefit of that person being the mother, is that the mother has boobs. Otherwise, a father can fill the role.
    Totally valid. I nearly changed that to read "stay-at-home parent" but I left it because 99.9% of BH is female and it still fairly unusual to have a SAH-Dad but I agree, either parent as a fulltime carer could meet the needs of a baby for attachment.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,783
    Thanks
    134
    Thanked
    75
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by roohif View Post
    Hey Wifey!!

    MWAH!
    MWAH BABY!!

  7. #7
    Guest Guest
    * Having a happy, confident mum
    * Being comforted when distressed
    * Having a fulltime stay-at-home mum
    * Learning to self-settle
    * Sleeping through the night
    * Only being offered totally fresh food (no baby food cans)
    * Access to a variety of developmentally appropriate toys
    * Socialization with other babies

    * Breastmilk as the main source of nutrition
    * Wearing cloth nappies

    The last two don't relate to me as I've been formula feeding since 8 weeks and don't use cloth. And as for feeding in general then I would have put that first.

  8. #8
    Fuchsia!'s Avatar
    Fuchsia! is offline Winner 2009 - Best Signature
    Winner 2010- The Best Signature Award
    Shmoooooooosh! AKA jaxcoop
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    11,910
    Thanks
    309
    Thanked
    815
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    this is my list in order of what is most important

    Having a happy, confident mum (obviously its not going to be beneficial if the mother is stressed to the max and can't handle everything)

    Breastmilk as the main source of nutrition (I think its extremely important and beneficial to baby to have at least colostrum and breastmilk to the age of at least 6mths (as longs as mum is able to handle it) as i believe vital for their health and long term health.

    Being comforted when distressed This one is more on par with breastfeeding, but as anyone with more then one child would know, getting to a baby while distressed is not always possible.

    Only being offered totally fresh food again very beneficial to their health

    Having a fulltime stay-at-home mum
    Very beneficial to babies to have a main carer available at all times.

    Sleeping through the night i choose this more for the fact that a baby that is a bad sleeper can make a mother on edge, and exhusted and this in turn can affect the baby.

    Wearing cloth nappies Better for the babies to wear, its not a high on my list thing. I found cloth nappies to be extremely stressful, but it would be beneficial to the baby to not wear something that contains chemicals next to their skin

    Learning to self-settle I think this is an important tool to learn, but i would never condone CIO or controlled crying techniques to achieve this.

    Access to a variety of developmentally appropriate toys - Not really that high on the list as i think they can develop without the need of toys

    Socialization with other babies
    I don't think babies need socialistion until they are around 1.5yrs-2yrs

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4,646
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked
    230
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    In order:

    Being comforted when distressed
    Having a happy, confident mum
    Having a fulltime stay-at-home mum
    Breastmilk as the main source of nutrition

    The rest of them I don't think are really that important to the baby in the first 12 months. They may be important to the parents and thus contribute to number 2.

    With the sold food I would say being offered a range of healthy foods is very important but I don't think baby having prepared food every now and then is a disaster, I do think baby eating crap is a problem.

    With the full time stay at home parent I think that it is perfectly fine for bub to spend time with other people provided that is a consistent person who cares about them. F goes to his nana each Friday since he was about 8 mths old and I go to work, there is no way I would send him to day care (and please lets not turn this into a debate, it is just what i am comfortable with) but this arrangement works well for us and contributes to importance factor no 2 - a happy confident mum.

  10. #10
    Phyllis Stein is offline Winner 2009 - The most politically correct member award
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,680
    Thanks
    622
    Thanked
    601
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    1. Definitely being comforted when distressed, though I think that can be summarised as consistently, appropriately and sensitively responding to baby's needs, including her emotional needs. The back and forth 'flow' of interaction between a primary caregiver and a baby is the basis of secure attachment. Attachment quality has such pervasive effects on every aspect of development that I'd have to prioritise appropriate responsiveness above all else (of course there are individual instances where responding ideally is impossible, it's how you respond in general that matters).

    2. Breastmilk as the primary source of food for the first six months at least, 12 months is even better!

    3. Having a happy, confident mother (or other caregiver). This is why genuine support for parents is so darned important, lest we be forced to compromise on 1 and 2 above.

    4. Having fulltime stay-at-home parent/s. I think until object permanence develops, this is probably closely linked with number 1.

    5. Access to a variety of developmentally appropriate objects (not necessarily "toys").

    6. Fresh food, not canned or jarred. If breastmilk is the primary source of nutrition then this one's not quite so important. If formula is used, it's an imperative.


    None of those listed below rate a mention really, in respect to baby's development needs in the first year.

    * Socialization with other babies
    * Sleeping through the night
    * Learning to self-settle
    * Wearing cloth nappies


 

Similar Threads

  1. How important is breastmilk for a 1+ year old?
    By decemberbubba in forum Breastfeeding Support
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-03-2012, 14:48
  2. Which is more important to you?
    By share a book in forum General Chat
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 01-02-2012, 19:21

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
FEATURED SUPPORTER
The Fix Program Sydney CBD and BroadwayPregnancy and women's health physio, pregnancy and new mum Pilates classes taught by our physios for you and bub. ...
REVIEWS
"Made bed time less anxious"
by Meld85
My Little Heart Whisbear - the Humming Bear reviews ›
"Wonderful natural Aussie made product!"
by Mrstwr
Baby U Goat Milk Moisturiser reviews ›
"Replaced good quality with cheap tight nappies"
by Kris
Coles Comfy Bots Nappies reviews ›