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  1. #11
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    We have one daughter, I am pregnant and we also have two dogs.

    We use cloth nappies so we never have to buy nappies, thank goodness. We also have our dog food delivered from a locally produced manufacturer, so that costs us $64 a fortnight. I don't include that in the food budget.

    Our food budget per fortnight is anywhere from $320 to $450. It's a lot, and we could do better. We just like our food However, there are some things that are more expensive. We drink soy milk which is pricey, and my DH is addicted to Milo. Haha. He is a cyclist and a personal trainer, so he eats a LOT.

    Our weekly shop includes formula, too, which is about $25 - $50 every two weeks.

    I never buy biscuits or anything like that. All of that stuff is home baked.

    Usually I go on a daily tally and don't do a big weekly shop. DD and I pop down to the shops in the morning to buy what we'll need for the day, or the next couple of days. That really minimises any waste, and we only get what we need, because doing it that way you HAVE to be strict otherwise you'd spend 50 bucks a day!

    We can stick to $20 a day doing it that way, which brings what we spend down to only $280 per fortnight.

    I find it much easier to budget and stick to a budget if I shop daily or every couple of days.

    Might not be so easy once number 2 is here!

    I am fully intending (and hoping - fingers crossed) to be able to breastfeed this one for longer, and once I am established I will try to express as much as I can for DD. Hopefully that will cut out any formula costs

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by HunterzMummy View Post
    I would love love love to see what you buy and make for a budget under $70 a wk.. i take my hat off - just remarkable

    give us some pointers???

  3. #13
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    i agree, must be really hard to feed a family on 60-70 bucks a week

    we used to budget 240 a week which includes dog food, bird seed cleaning products and batteries etc.

    however I was finiding that we didnt plan very well and ended up eating out alot as we were missing key ingredients to things.

    Ive managed to get it down to 100 for the groceries(this sometimes includes nappies but not formula) and 50 bucks for fruit and veggies markets, we buy eggs there as well.
    You can do it... it just takes planning. Now DD is having solids, Im looking forward to the markets on friday so I can choose her some yummy vegies

  4. #14
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    Hooves is offline My children/my legacy, the best of me is inside them.
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    ALDI Love that place.

    We currently spend, about $200 -$300 per fortnight on groceries.

    That includes nappies and wipes. I don't always need them though.

    I shop around and get stuff on special, it sometimes means going to 4 different shops though. (make that 5).

    I have been buying our meat through a wholesale place that opened here, so much cheaper. Although Aldi and Coles, are not too bad on their bulk packs.

    We eat a lot of mince, chicken, and steak. So I wouldn't call my meat budget flash. We also only buy sausages from the butchers. Cause hubby will not eat the coles ones..

    I also try and get the bigger silverside roasts and stuff so they do lunches or can be cut in half and frozen for two meals. I buy the huge silver side for about $22 from coles, and depending on what I want it for we get two or three nights.

    Vegies I get from Aldi, they seem to last longer, and taste better. If we had a decent farmers market here I would shop there.

    And I buy toilet paper, paper towel, washing powder, etc in bulk. Seems to mean I need a little extra cupboard space, but I save heaps in the long run.


    When we were a family of 3 plus a bub, we used to budget $150 a fortnight for food. I would hate to have to make that last now though. It was hard. But could be done. Turned me into a bit of a food natzi. and I had to make cakes and that from scratch.

  5. #15
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    RoseKathleen is offline ...Yes - motherhood is a full-time job!
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    For me, DH, DS (2 and still in nappies), DD (newborn) & 3 large cats I am spending about $170 per week. But we are meat-eaters and that really chews the money up!!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by HunterzMummy View Post
    I would love love love to see what you buy and make for a budget under $70 a wk.. i take my hat off - just remarkable
    We spend anywhere between $60 to $80 for 2 adults and 1 18month old...


    We buy all our fruit and vege from either the fruit and vege shop or the markets because it is so much cheaper- this week we spent $30 on fruit and vege...and that includes thing like carrots and potato's we only buy once a fortnight.

    All our dry stock comes Aldi. Things like the cereal taste the same, and is considerably cheaper. We buy a bot of frozen vege there as well as a back up incase we can't get to the shops or markets for fresh stuff.

    We buy very little when it comes to packaged food like biscuits and chips, we also don't have juice, milo, softdrink, ect, because it isn't needed. If we want a treat, we bake fresh and usually do things like caramel banana pancakes.

    As for dairy, we buy the large tub's of yogurt over individually package ones, and buy our cheese in kilo blocks then separate it into weekly lots (usually 3 week worth, depending on what we're cooking).

    We eat limited meat products, and if we use things like mince, we only ever use around 200 gms and mix it with lentils to make it go further, and we like the taste. We also check out fish markets- about a month and a half ago we got 10 salmon fillets for $20 which is really good, so we froze them and have them occasionally.

    Things like salad dressings, mayo, chutney's and sauces can be made using fresh ingredients and taste a lot better than pre made bottled stuff.

    Things like toilet paper work out best when bought in the large 36 roll packs- lasts for around 2 months. The chemist is also a good place to get tissues, toilet paper, cleaning products and personal and hygiene products. This week I got 1ltr of dish washing liquid for $1.95 which will last for ages. Bi-carb, vinegar and lemon juice are also great for cleaning, and really cheap as well.

    We buy nappies only when they're on sale (Coles has had sales on Sorbies for 2 packets for $25) and DD is in cloth a lot of the time at home anyway, so a packet lasts longer.

    I guess the best way to cut back is buy lots of fresh food and cook things from scratch without pre made sauces, ect.

    Hope that helps...
    Last edited by Luna Lovegood; 14-10-2009 at 16:31.

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    Personally I think your diet suffers when you only have $60 or $70 a week to spend.

    The only prepackaged food I buy is muesli bars and some biscuits for the kids school lunches - everything else I make at home.

    We don't buy juice, milo, cordial or softdrink.

    I don't buy yoghurt as its just too damm expensive.

    I must admit with a budget like this we don't have fresh fruit and vegies every day of the week which I really hate but have no choice. Once the fresh is up then we are onto tinned fruit.

    We eat pasta a few days a week which sucks or mornays with rice - can make these for almost nothing.

    I too buy fish in bulk about once every 3 months from a food wholesaler - costs next to nothing and the kids love it.

    I buy black and gold toilet paper, tissues, wipes, nappies - pretty much everything which I hate - can't wait to be able to afford soft toilet paper and some decent shampoo and conditioner.

    The worst bit about it is there isn't alot of choices - our diets don't vary much week to week which suck and trying to cook anything really yummy is hard when you can't afford the fresh herbs to go with it - can't wait for the herb/vergie garden in my backyard grows - more options then.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazymuma View Post
    Personally I think your diet suffers when you only have $60 or $70 a week to spend.

    The only prepackaged food I buy is muesli bars and some biscuits for the kids school lunches - everything else I make at home.

    We don't buy juice, milo, cordial or softdrink.

    I don't buy yoghurt as its just too damm expensive.

    I must admit with a budget like this we don't have fresh fruit and vegies every day of the week which I really hate but have no choice. Once the fresh is up then we are onto tinned fruit.

    We eat pasta a few days a week which sucks or mornays with rice - can make these for almost nothing.

    I too buy fish in bulk about once every 3 months from a food wholesaler - costs next to nothing and the kids love it.

    I buy black and gold toilet paper, tissues, wipes, nappies - pretty much everything which I hate - can't wait to be able to afford soft toilet paper and some decent shampoo and conditioner.

    The worst bit about it is there isn't alot of choices - our diets don't vary much week to week which suck and trying to cook anything really yummy is hard when you can't afford the fresh herbs to go with it - can't wait for the herb/vergie garden in my backyard grows - more options then.
    I personally don't find this- perhaps this could be because my husband is a chef, and is very creative with the meals we make.

    We are not limited to $60-80, thats just how things usually work out for us. We don't snack a lot during the day and eat a lot of fruit. When you're going to the fruit shop or market and getting 1 kg of apples for $3 and a kg of oranges for $2, then that is really good for snacks during the week.

    We usually pay about $2-$2.50 for a kg of potato's, which make a great meal when boiled and stuffed with left over meat, garlic butter and served with a salad.

    Seriously have a look at your local chemist- I always find Terry White to have great house hold stuff on sale- cleaning and personal hygeine.

    A really nice meal is gnocci and it isn't hard to make at all. Click here for a recipe. As for a sauce: can of crushed tomato's, basil, garlic, onion, beans, grated carrot would go great.
    Last edited by Luna Lovegood; 14-10-2009 at 16:31.

  9. #19
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    Gumby is offline I eat skinny people for breakfast...;) I am on a lifestyle change challenge... JOIN ME
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    For our family which includes 2 adults, 3 kids and a dog we spend around $300 a fortnight. I bulk buy meat fortnightly and freeze into meal size amounts. And we buy fresh fruit, veg and dairy daily. We also use cloth nappies and vinegar and bicarb for washing and cleaning so hardly any cost there.

  10. #20
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    I really do think it also depends on where you live.

    Perth, for example, was recently found to be as expensive to live as London. It is RIDICULOUS here. Everything is very, very expensive - it's an expensive town, that's that. It costs more to live in Perth than it does to live in other parts of Australia.

    It never used to be that way but it is now. Rent is more. Food is more. Clothing is more. We've just hit the $5 ceiling for coffee (although it's been over that for some time now).

    Also, we have less range, less choices and more expenses because of the distances things have to travel to get here.

    It's a joke. We would be able to live FAR more comfortably in Melbourne or even Sydney on our income than we can in Perth.


 

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