View Poll Results: What is the gross income in your household?

Voters
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  • 0-15,000

    4 1.78%
  • 15,000 - 30,000

    21 9.33%
  • 30,000 - 50,000

    41 18.22%
  • 50,000 - 70,000

    34 15.11%
  • 70,000 - 100,000

    52 23.11%
  • 100,000 - 150,000

    37 16.44%
  • 150,000 - 200,000

    13 5.78%
  • 200,000 - 250,000

    7 3.11%
  • 250,000 - 300,000

    4 1.78%
  • 300,000 - 400,000

    2 0.89%
  • 400,000 - 500,000

    1 0.44%
  • 500,000 - 700,000

    1 0.44%
  • 700,000 - 900,000

    1 0.44%
  • 900,000 - 1,000,000

    0 0%
  • 1,000,000 +

    7 3.11%
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Results 121 to 127 of 127
  1. #121
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    Mum I'm Hungry - just curious, what sort of specialist is your husband?

  2. #122
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    He's an anaesthetist.

    Don't worry, he's not an obstetrician

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mummum81 View Post
    That's funny, I can recall many times where I was in the office at all hours paying bills and wages (yes with the business owner's money) while the business owners were knocking off early every singe day to go the pub. Seemed in my experience at least, that the business owners were the ones that got to "go home click off and rest".
    Yeah but how long had the business been going for?

    I don't agree with v8 crew...I know low income earners also work very hard. What I'm about to say has nothing to do with that part.
    My DH is not a low income earner right now. He owns his own business and works his butt off. For 8 months he worked day and night, from 8am until 2am with NO pay at all....all to get the business up and running. He is still working crazy hours with no guarantee the business will stay afloat (the economical crisis hasn't helped at all) but if it does stay afloat, and takes off like we're hoping then he will have the luxury of working part time and living a much more cushy lifestyle in regards to work which a new employee could easily think he got lucky and has an easy ride but he started this journey (not this particular business, but the journey that gave him the qualifications to get to having this potential) at 18 when he studied full time and was running his own business. It's been 10 years so far of working 60-80 hour weeks in high stress positions and whilst most 18 year olds were off partying on the weekend after their hard week of work DH was at home working, or studying. He has to work all this long weekend after working a full week, and coming home and working until at least midnight every night...then has just as busy a workload next week, and then is away for week next weekend, which will then give him an even bigger workload when he gets back home while he finishes that project. His employees, whilst they work hard...they all have the weekend off and are getting to enjoy it with their families. At some point, we would love that lifestyle too.
    If a business owner is having an easy ride then it's only because of a damn hard, very stressful ride previously....at least 98% of the time.

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleAce View Post
    Yeah but how long had the business been going for?


    If a business owner is having an easy ride then it's only because of a damn hard, very stressful ride previously....at least 98% of the time.
    Around 50 years. They inherited it from their dad.
    It was an easy ride for them, the company was involved in building and construction and got very lucky with the olympics, landing a huge contract at which point the company grew 100 times bigger without them dong much at all.

  5. #125
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    Between $115K-$130K. Depends if Dh gets overtime or not!
    I'll be living on half of my wage soon for a few months then no wage! (maternity leave)

  6. #126
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    For the first year and a half of DD's life, our family taxable income was $12,000/year, but then I was also getting FTB part A and B which totalled $280/fn, and Rent Assistance, which was $110/fn. I was surprised when I stopped work to see how much the PPS had gone up, it was lucky because I was worried about not working. I no longer get Rent Assistance, and FTB has since dropped $241/fn when DD turned 5. I've never received child support.

    Someone way back at the beginning said that pension amounts are more than $15,000/year. Parenting Payment Single is $572/fn, $14,872/year. Centrelink payments for those who don't have kids is far, far less than this amount. I don't know how young people working part-time or studying manage to move out of home and live on their own.

    Since working my taxable income has been anywhere from $22,000/year to $25,000/year ($24,000 last financial year) gross. Tax comes out, PPS is a taxable income, recipients of PPS pay tax on that.

    We have everything we could ever want or need. We have a house with 3 bedrooms that we don't have to share with anyone, we have a nice sized yard that's big enough for kids to play in, the dog to run in, and a garden to grow in while at the same time being small enough to be easily maintained. I'm able to cover the cost of the bills to run the house, and can even run appliances such as airconditioner, dryer and freezer without it putting the power bill up too high to pay. We have a good, reliable (used) car that I'm able to afford to pay off and maintain. DD attends 3 different organised sporting activities a term, attends a Catholic school, has nice and good fitting clothes, gets new toys when needed, and has a large range of books and board games to keep us entertained. We also have the Internet, go on family holidays, go away on camping trips, have a fully stocked fridge, freezer and pantry, and a fuelled up car.

    As someone said, it's not about how much money you have, it's what you do with it that matters.

    I'm also lucky that while I'm working, I'm able to put money away so when unexpected expenses crop up I can afford to pay for it. DD sees a private Paediatrician, child psychologist, and has other medical expenses that I've had to pay for because I'm too impatient to wait for her to be seen through the public system.

    We're going away for the night tonight, a bit later because there's no need to rush. Another week left of school, then we're going exploring a few areas up north, we have enough fuel in the car to do that, and enough money to pay for more.

    We do have a strict budget, which is how we can afford the extras and still cover all the costs of everyday living.
    Last edited by V8; 12-09-2009 at 11:37. Reason: irrelevant

  7. #127
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    With computer hacking and all that I am surprised that ppl earning so much would want to indentify themselves let alone why they would have their annual income come in at so much is just not good accounting sense. I wonder if some of these ppl have just given a figure for their company turnover instead . Just a comment on the ppl who say more money would mean less stress and vis versa no money = more stress I say debt is the stress you can be happy with any amount of money but if you have to give most of it to debt or worse still have more debt than you earn then thats the stress imo. Also working hard and making money don't always go hand in hand but thats life and it comes down to in the end what your hrly rate is I guess and how many hrs you do. Well theres my 2c worth at least thoughts are for free lol.
    Last edited by lulu 2; 12-09-2009 at 09:30.


 

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