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  1. #1
    Phyllis Stein is offline Winner 2009 - The most politically correct member award
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    Default Optimising the health of your formula-fed baby

    First off, I want to say that artificial baby milk (ABM) is incomparable to breastmilk. There is simply no getting around the fact that breastmilk, as the normal food of babies, is the best start for almost all of them*.

    However, some women (such as myself), are unable to breastfeed, and as such, we need to look at other ways to optimise our baby's health. To do so, we need to understand how formula is inferior to breastmilk, and attempt to compensate for that as best we can.

    This article outlines some of the main ways that we can optimise our bottlefed baby's health.

    http://www.naturalfamilyonline.com/g...mula-fed-baby/

    When It Has to be Formula: Optimizing the Health of Your Formula-Fed Baby

    By Dr. Linda Folden Palmer

    What can you do to optimize the health of your formula-fed infant? First off, know that infant formulas are constantly improving. Research on breast milk substitutes is growing every day, with few bumps in the road. Some very recent fortification attempts hold the promise of possibly lowering the greater risks of diabetes, heart disease, obesity and cancer found among children and adults who were formula-fed as infants.

    That said, there are strategies you can take now to improve your formula-fed baby’s health, as well as things you will definitely want to avoid. These factors can have a life-long impact on your child’s overall health.

    Use hydrolyzed milk formula
    The best choice for a first formula is a hydrolyzed milk formula. Cow’s milk proteins are large and difficult for young babies to digest. In hydrolyzed formulas, the proteins are broken down into smaller, more tolerable pieces.
    Many of the potential problems with milk intolerance can be avoided by using hydrolyzed formula from the beginning. Often, small but regular intestinal bleeding occurs in formula-fed infants (or breastfed infants not tolerating mother’s diet), even when dairy intolerance is not suspected. This common occurrence is usually undetected but can lead to anemia. It may be preventable by simply beginning with hydrolyzed formula for the first months of life.
    Hydrolyzed formulas do not taste as good to infants who have tasted other formulas. Therefore, it’s sometimes difficult to switch to a hydrolyzed formula once you’ve begun with regular formula.

    Don’t forget nucleotides
    For about a decade now, many formulas have been adding RNA and DNA building blocks known as nucleotides. Naturally found in breastmilk, nucleotides help the intestinal immune system and assist in fat digestion. Nucleotide-supplemented formulas have been shown to reduce incidence of diarrhea. Selecting a formula that lists nucleotides in the ingredients may prevent some illnesses in your baby.

    Use acidophilus
    Formula-fed infants develop adult-type flora in their intestines; these flora are part of the cause of formula-fed babies’ increased incidence of intestinal illnesses. Providing a daily dose of friendly bacteria (the kind found in yogurt) may help to maintain a gentler flora for baby.
    Don’t give your young infant yogurt. Instead, provide a twice-daily dose of a good quality powdered combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium and some other good bacteria. You can add the powder directly to the formula when preparing it. Store these friendly bacteria, known as probiotics, in the refrigerator.
    Formula companies are currently studying the addition of probiotics to store formulas. They have been found to be safe for infants and to reduce colic and diarrhea, although occasional constipation has been reported with probiotic-fortified formulas. Daily use of probiotics may reduce your baby’s potential for developing allergies.

    Consider DHA and ARA
    There has been much research lately in regards to certain fatty acids known as DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and ARA (arachidonic acid), important nutrients for brain and vision development. These long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids found in breast milk have traditionally been very low in infant formulas. It is known that babies are able to make their own DHA and ARA, but it has been found that they are unable to create optimal amounts.
    This discrepancy explains in part the slight neurological and visual deficits linked with formula feeding. Studies show some visual and cognitive benefits when these fatty acids are supplemented in formula-fed infants. Several recently released studies and ongoing studies are working to find the optimal levels and forms of these to add to infant formulas. There are hopes that adding these fatty acids may even help to close the gap between formula and breastfed infants in terms of diabetes, obesity and heart disease.
    Formulas with added DHA and ARA are available today. Study results so far are mixed but mostly positive. Oxidation of these fatty acids during storage may be a problem and may account for some of the mixed results. Some infants experience diarrhea from these formulas. Unfortunately, some formulas, upon adding these new ingredients, are dropping the valuable nucleotide supplements. Fresh forms of these fatty acids might be more beneficial to infants. Some consultants are recommending adding these directly to infants’ diet.
    Cod liver oil is an excellent source of DHA as well as EPA, another important fatty acid. Expeller-pressed walnut oil is another source of these. A half a teaspoon per day may be appropriate for a small infant.
    ARA is found only in animal sources. Egg yolk is an excellent source for babies, but it’s not something to give newborns. Some nutrition consultants suggest providing one yolk plus a teaspoon of cod liver oil daily after 4 months. Since egg white is the part of eggs that can cause allergy, you should avoid using them with infants. Cod liver oil may loosen the stools.

    “Nurse” your bottle-fed baby
    The term “to nurse” means to provide gentle nurturing care. Nursing your baby during feeding provides face-to-face contact and rich non-verbal and verbal conversation — all extremely valuable for your baby’s social and neurological development. Skin-to-skin contact is shown in studies to provide an additional advantage and can be included in a cozy bottle feeding

    Reduce cortisol releases
    When babies are allowed to cry without receiving a nurturing response, they release a large amount of cortisol into their systems. When this is allowed to happen regularly, their brains develop permanent, life-long patterns of increased cortisol release in response to stress. This increased cortisol-release pattern is strongly associated with depression and heart disease in later life.
    In addition to the permanent modeling of brain receptor responses, chronic cortisol elevation makes babies more susceptible to illness. Incidentally, mothers release cortisol when their babies cry, too, increasing their own susceptibility to frequent illness, heart disease and depression.
    In contrast, affectionate, responsive care induces the release of positive bonding and health-promoting hormones such as oxytocin in both mother and child.

    Sleep with your baby in your bedroom
    Studies show that the incidence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is greatly reduced when your baby sleeps in the same room as you do, compared to sleeping in a crib in another part of the house. When neither parent smokes and proper safety measures are taken, cosleeping in the parental bed provides the same safety as crib sleeping in the same room, especially after the first two weeks of life.

    Don’t use homemade formulas
    Concerns over formula difficulties and trends toward organic and raw products have created increasing mention of making infant formulas at home. While “organic” and “natural” are wonderful concepts, raw, organic or standard cow’s and goat’s milk are dangerous infant feeds. The levels of many components are far too high in these milks, and the levels of other components are far too low. The number of problems that could arise is too high to mention.

    Companies developing breast milk substitutes have devoted a century of research to create optimal formulas. No homemade formula recommendations have near the advantage of this research. And professionally made organic formulas have now hit the American shelves.

    Consider starting solids sooner
    Studies show that delaying the introduction of solid foods is highly beneficial when a baby is exclusively breastfed — but the same does not always ring true for formula-fed or formula-supplemented infants. It is difficult for some formula-fed infants to gain enough iron from their formula, no matter how much is in it, and babies’ own iron stores may begin running out after several months. Dark-colored vegetables also have valuable antioxidants that have been missing in the formula diet.
    Babies who have been experiencing a slight intolerance to their formula may robustly respond to the introduction of non-dairy solid foods. Some formula-fed babies fare better with introductions of strained vegetables, meats or a little fortified rice cereal as early as 4 months. Sugary foods, juice or plain white-flour snacks have much less nutritional value than formula and are not appropriate for babies. Delay the introduction of fruit, which teaches babies to acquire a taste for sweet foods, unless you are trying prunes for constipation.

    Keep formula in the diet for 18 months
    Studies show that children fare even better when formula is continued in the diet for 18 months or more, rather than switching to cow’s milk or other drinks at one year.

    Consider avoiding the vitamin K injection
    Babies are purposely born with low levels of vitamin K, which is meant to increase gradually through feedings of breast milk, which is deliberately “low” in vitamin K. This tightly managed vitamin K level controls the rate of cellular reproduction. When infants are injected with the huge amount of vitamin K routinely given at birth, cellular reproduction is allowed to get out of hand. Some slight increase in leukemia cases is associated with these injections.
    On the other hand, serious damage from a rare bleeding problem may be prevented by vitamin K injections at birth. A baby born with an undetected liver disorder can suffer damaging or fatal bleeding into the brain, and the clotting action of added vitamin K can reduce this bleeding.
    Studies have shown that breastfed babies can be supplemented in smaller oral doses spread out over the first weeks of life and still safely avoid this rare but dangerous bleeding complication. Formulas are already supplemented with much higher levels of vitamin K than are found in breast milk. Studies suggest that this gradually supplemented amount of vitamin K is also adequate to prevent bleeding problems, negating the need for routine injection at birth. In the absence of known bleeding disorders, avoiding the potentially dangerous injection of vitamin K for infants who are fed formula from birth may decrease the rare but serious risk of leukemia.

    Take immune-protective measures
    Because formula-fed infants miss out on the daily provisions of immunities and chemical defenses from mother’s milk, you should do all you can to assure your baby gets the best possible dose of antibodies from your body before birth. The greatest portion of these immunoglobulins are pumped into the newborn’s body during labor. A child born via scheduled cesarean section misses out on labor and its last-minute provisions. Even when a C-section is recommended, natural labor can often be allowed to happen first, giving your baby a big, important immunity boost.

    Newborns are susceptible to illness, and the first weeks of life are the most dangerous. Simply keeping your baby close to home and screening visitors for any illnesses can help a great deal. Visitors should wear a snug mask if they’ve recovered from a virus less than 3 days prior to their visit.

    Try just a little bit
    When physical limitations or lifestyle circumstances may not allow for continued breastfeeding, supplying breast milk in the first few weeks of life can provide your baby with a large edge on health and survival, especially if he was born early or tiny. The first milk, called colostrum, is especially full of immune-providing, protective factors.
    If you plan to formula feed by a certain date, your baby can benefit greatly if you avoid using formula supplements at all until it is nearly time for the switch. Any amount of formula supplementation weakens the advantages of the breast milk. American infants who are fed formula from birth enjoy more than a 99% survival rate; that rate is even higher when some early breast milk is received, growing proportionally with the amount of breast milk received to about 99.5% for fully breastfed infants.
    If you cannot produce milk, you may be able to obtain donor milk from milk banks and occasionally directly from donating mothers. Long-term use of donor milk can be expensive and complicated, but short-term use could be a powerful investment in the future of your child.

    You can go back
    There are occasions when a parent feels that formula is just not working well for a particular child. Intolerance to all forms of formula is usually the dilemma involved. Relactation is a viable yet seldom-mentioned consideration in these situations. I saw one occasion in which a child developed an illness that could respond much better to breast milk feedings, so the mother decided to give relactation a try. With the assistance of a lactation consultant, relactation works fairly well or very well for most mothers who are determined to succeed.
    *I understand that mothers can feel immense guilt and grief when their bf relationship ends, for whatever reason. This thread is not intended to make you feel worse, though that may be the outcome for some. I'm sorry for that.

  2. #2
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    Wow, great info there. Thanks mahna mahna, I've bookmarked that link.

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    Thanks for the info

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    Fantastic info mahna

    Karicare make a hydrolised formula, I used with my DD but that was a few years ago.

  5. #5
    Phyllis Stein is offline Winner 2009 - The most politically correct member award
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jade's Mum View Post
    QUESTION: What brands of formula are hydrolized?
    They are the ones labelled HA - Karicare, Nan, Neocate etc.

    As for the solids, that is still a bit controversial, so I think relying on your baby's 'ready' signs is still the best way to go.

    The good thing about solids introduction is that it gives you a chance to improve gut flora. However, to gain that benefit, I'd steer clear of processed babyfoods, which are virtually 'dead' in terms of good bacteria and enzymes. Organic fresh fruit and veges are the best source.

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    This should be a sticky for sure!

    I also want to add another thing to consider is BPA in baby bottles, I know not everyone is concerned about BPA but some mothers are, and if I was bottle feeding I would like to know about that at the start, rather than later down the track.

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    I was thinking about doing something like this Mahna but wasnt sure if it was worth it LOL !



    Karicare & NAN are the only ones here in Oz that have the HA formulas .... Overseas there is quite a range sadly !

    The above formulas have a partially digested hydrolysed formula whereas getting a fully digested formula which is unrecognisable needs to be sought through a Paed who diagnoses a child with issues & then gets government authority to give the script out.

    The next step would be then going to something like Pepti Jr which is more broken down again but does need the above authority.

    Elecare & Neocate are the only fully digested formulas available these are the ones that are only available on government authority & after extensive investigation.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to reAllytee For This Useful Post:

    Willo36 (04-01-2012)

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    S26 often causes problems because its caesin (sp?) based which can be too heavy on little tummies, where as formulas like Karicare are whey based which is easier to digest. Although when karicare added that new 'prebiotic' it gave my dd the runs I wish they had of just left it the way it was.

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    Karicare Gold + has everything that this FANTASTIC article mentioned.... Man i studied everything in just about every tin.... However most maternity hospitals now are recommending to put babies on HA formulas when a mother is not breastfeeding.... and i couldn't agree more with introducing 'good flora' to the intestine.... I've started DS inner health plus and he has certainly benefited from it....

    Thanks for sharing that great article and it makes me happy that i did and continuing to do the right things for my little man....

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    Certainly an intersting read.

    Karicare gold + has all those things but I have read some intersting articles about the gut issues it can cause in many babies.

    I prefer to use an organic formula and solely organic food for my boy but I will certainly look into probiotics.


 

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