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  1. #21
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    hi
    just letting u know they put my c section eaier to the`9 jan. i went through the public system and found out that the staff were more helpful then have it naturally. it wasnt as bad as i thought it was. they dont do breeched births anymore. as the risks are high and if something goes wrong they dont want to get sued.
    also i didnt bleed as long as did for my frist as they cleaned everything out. i was in 4 3 days.
    just thought of the baby in end and counted down till i saw him.

    cas

  2. #22
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    sassy, I am highly supported to the informations.

  3. #23
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    I would love to know how much "The likelihood of interventions such as induction of labour, instrumental delivery or caesarean section increased with socioeconomic advantage".
    That is an incredibley interesting that i definitely think is worth some discussion. I have also read that women who are at the higher end of the spectrum are more likely to breastfeed. I always put this down to the likeliness of better education and awareness of the benifits. Looking at these new stats though?

  4. #24
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    That's ****, you have to pay $30 to receive/read the complete report, which should answer most of your questions.

  5. #25
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    Hiya!

    Just read the post above and had a flash of...

    Too posh to push...???

    Don't know the stats but do know that the higher level education women and the lower SES women are at a very similar risk for cs.

    Perhaps indicating that highly educated women think too much and get scared into cs due to risk stats etc being thrown at them, or perhaps they normalise the risk of cs through knowledge... And the obvious low income = poor choice or limited options??? (Prone to bully tactics of OB's???

    Just ideas????


    Sarah

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by hazelsmummy View Post
    I would love to know how much "The likelihood of interventions such as induction of labour, instrumental delivery or caesarean section increased with socioeconomic advantage".
    That is an incredibley interesting that i definitely think is worth some discussion.
    I'd say it's a pretty simple equation.

    Higher socioeconomic bracket -> Higher uptake of private health insurance -> More likely to use a private OB and private hospital -> More likely to end up with said interventions due to choice of care.

    It's quite scary when you look at the stats what is happening in private hospitals in terms of intervention. Every year they top out the public system for caesarean, induction, episiotomy and instrument births. Anecdotally, I've supported quite a few private hospital births as a doula and for first time mothers in particular, you better be pretty well prepared to fight to get through the experience without at least one of the above.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by missie_mack View Post
    Interesting. I would have thought that higher income bracket meaning later in life baby would have been a big part of this equation. As well as women going to a private hospital with a particular choice in mind (like those wanting a maternally requested CS) because in a public hospital your preferences are generally ignored. Infact our local private hospital has a higher rate of VBAC than the public (which was 16% which was higher than the state average of 12.4% and that of the local public hospy at 14% last time I checked)
    The idea of more older mothers using private care being the cause of the higher intervention rates in private hospitals is trotted out alot by the RANZCOG.

    In 2006, 2.2% of mothers in the public system were over 40 years old and 2.7% in the private system were over 40. Each year the percentages are pretty much equal, and also a pretty miniscule number of the total births. It just doesn't bear out to blame 2% of women for the caesarean rate almost tripling in under ten years.

    You're right in saying more maternally requested caesareans happen in private hospitals. But it still doesn't explain the sometimes massive descripency. Public hospitals average a 27% c/s rate. Private average 40% nationally. But many are much much higher than that, some 60 or 70%. We know that the number of women who request a caesarean without any influence from their carer beforehand is very small, below 5%. Most women still do want to birth vaginally as long as they are healthy and feel safe doing so.

    At any rate elective caesareans do not explain the higher levels of other intervention, including induction, augmentation and instrument births in private hospitals that we see every single year in the perinatal data.

    There are some private facilities that will buck this trend - there is one here on the Sunshine Coast that comes to mind - but which ever way you look at it, a healthy woman is more likely to experience these interventions in private care, generally speaking.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by PunkyDiva View Post
    That's ****, you have to pay $30 to receive/read the complete report, which should answer most of your questions.

    Hi
    You can read and download the 'Australia's mothers and babies 2005' pdf for free from http://www.npsu.unsw.edu.au/NPSUweb.nsf/page/ps20

    Sarah

  9. #29
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    Just a quick comment re the 17ish% who admitted smoking during pregnancy... I'm not sure where they get this statistic from, but I've done a bit of work in market research and I know how results can be skewed... which means it's possible that the percentage includes the mums who quit when they found out that they were preg, or soon afterwards.

    I'd like to see a stat on how many actually smoked for more than the first 2 months (especially considering some don't find out till they're 6-8 weeks, ad see how it compares to the one quoted.

    As for the CS rates.... I'm HORRIFIED. 'Nuff said.

  10. #30
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    Private obstetricians are trained surgeons and they're very good at their job. Its not surprising that they choose to try and control the birth environment through intervention and doing what they know best.
    Women in the higher socio-economic bracket pay thousands of $$$ to a private surgeon (OB) to monitor their pregnancy and birth - why are we surprised that they receive more surgical procedures? kwim?

    I had a natural, vaginal birth on all 4's in a private hospital with a very high c section rate.
    I had a great OB who gave me complete control of my birth. The midwives took complete control of the room around me, my OB just sat in the corner and stitched me up at the end (I should have stood to push but was too embarrassed, and he did a great job by the way).

    If we want to lower the c section rate in private hospitals then we should encourage midwifery care for private patients, just as we do for those in the public system.

    By the way - I'm having my 2nd in the public system - I have full trust in the midwifery care offered there - the nurses are the true heroes!


 

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