+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,530
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    2
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Older mums NOT the reason for increased c/sec rate

    from: http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/young-mothers-in-caesarean-debate/2007/07/13/1183833774744.html

    Young mothers in caesarean debate
    Carol Nader
    July 14, 2007


    FIRST-TIME mothers and women who are induced or have previously had a caesarean are the biggest contributors to caesarean rates at the Royal Women's Hospital.
    That information comes from a study that challenges the belief that older women with complicated pregnancies are the reason for the rise in caesarean rates.
    An analysis of more than 5800 women who gave birth to more than 6000 babies at the hospital in 2005 shows that 1651, or 28.3 per cent, had a caesarean. This included 592 elective and 1059 emergency caesareans.
    Published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the findings will add to the debate that at least a proportion of caesareans are unnecessary.
    Doctors have said the rate is too high. There is growing concern that otherwise healthy young women have their first baby by caesarean when it is not medically necessary.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    7,648
    Thanks
    1,262
    Thanked
    417
    Reviews
    21
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    On one hand I'm so over this debate because there are so many women who have had cesarians feel guilty for it and feel they have to justify their choices or explain why they had to have one etc. On the other hand it is concerning that so many women are having cesarians out of fear (i'm making an assumption here). I would like to read a study on why there are so many cesarians.

    Its the reasons for electing that I'm interested in, not on who is having cesarians. if any of that makes sense .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    26,920
    Thanks
    2,732
    Thanked
    6,744
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Owen&Noah's_mum View Post
    On one hand I'm so over this debate because there are so many women who have had cesarians feel guilty for it and feel they have to justify their choices or explain why they had to have one etc. On the other hand it is concerning that so many women are having cesarians out of fear (i'm making an assumption here). I would like to read a study on why there are so many cesarians.

    Its the reasons for electing that I'm interested in, not on who is having cesarians. if any of that makes sense .
    I dunno, but maybe finding out WHO has the highest rates of caesareans might help try to uncover the WHY.

    Like, now that it's discovered (albeit only at the Royal Womens...) that YOUNGER women are having them, it might be easier to discover why... like maybe talknig to younger women...

    I imagine a lot of younger mothers feel a little pressured, especially by the fact that a lot of us are more used to a "child" role, being told what to do and whatnot.

    I know part of hte reason for my caesarean was my own lack of knowledge and confidence to defend myself or object to thing... and I imagine I'm not alone on that one...

  4. #4
    our little treasures's Avatar
    our little treasures is offline Gorgeous family wonderful friends <3 life!
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    8,116
    Thanks
    40
    Thanked
    4
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    What I found interesting was the First time mothers (easily lead IMO) and women who had previously had a c/s, which would be the first time mothers. So really I think they need to establish why first time mothers are having c/s.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,066
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    1
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Hmmm the way I read this article, it doesn't necessarily say that all these c-sections were by the choice of the mother - after all it says there were almost twice as many 'emergency' c-sections as elective - just that there is a concern they weren't all 'medically necessary'.

    Not criticising those who elect to have caesars at all, I believe everyone has a right to choose:

    BUT I am glad that they are paying some attention to this, because I know there are a lot of women (including myself) who've had 'emergency' c-sections, and would argue that with different care they might indeed have had a 'normal' vaginal birth.

    Quote Originally Posted by becca74 View Post
    FIRST-TIME mothers and women who are induced
    I was a first time mother who was induced, and I absolutely believe that it was the induction and resulting interventions that resulted in my emerg c-section. And I'm not a 'younger' mother, although I did have a totally uncomplicated pregancy. The only thing 'wrong' with my pregnancy was that I hadn't gone into labour by the 42nd week so it was deemed 'necessary' to induce me.
    Last edited by ~Kimba~; 15-07-2007 at 09:31.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    26,920
    Thanks
    2,732
    Thanked
    6,744
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Kimbaleo View Post
    BUT I am glad that they are paying some attention to this, because I know there are a lot of women (including myself) who've had 'emergency' c-sections, and would argue that with different care they might indeed have had a 'normal' vaginal birth.
    I can definately understand that!

    It would be nice for them to go a step further and have "elective by choice," or "medically advised" type of electives though. I always feel so disheartened to know my "elective" caesarean has brought up the percentages, and that I'm lumped in the "elective" category. I don't believe I'm anything like women who TRULY elect their caesareans... not in regards to statistics anyway.

    By saying mine is "elective" kinda makes it sound like I was like, "Hey, I want a caesarean," and got one... but it SO wasn't like that for me (and many other women I imagine), so perhaps if they figured out who WANTED to have a caesarean, and those who were told they should have one. Would make studies seem a bit more accurate IMO.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,066
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    1
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by SassyMummy View Post
    It would be nice for them to go a step further and have "elective by choice," or "medically advised" type of electives though. I always feel so disheartened to know my "elective" caesarean has brought up the percentages, and that I'm lumped in the "elective" category. I don't believe I'm anything like women who TRULY elect their caesareans... not in regards to statistics anyway.

    By saying mine is "elective" kinda makes it sound like I was like, "Hey, I want a caesarean," and got one... but it SO wasn't like that for me (and many other women I imagine), so perhaps if they figured out who WANTED to have a caesarean, and those who were told they should have one. Would make studies seem a bit more accurate IMO.
    Yep I'm hearing you , and I agree with you. The term 'elective' doesn't seem to differentiate between those mothers who genuinely wanted/ chose a c-section (which I'm not criticising, it's their choice), and those who may not have 'wanted' one per se, but were advised by caregivers that a c-section was 'necessary' before going into labour. That's why I'd call the latter a 'planned' c-section, rather than 'elective'.

    Perhaps for statistical purposes they should use the terms 'elective', 'planned' and 'unplanned/ emergency' and compare the stats between the 3, would be a bit more realistic I think, esp if they want to examine/ compare the reasons why a c-section eventuated.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    772
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    0
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Stacey I totally agree with you.
    I think that in many cases women are given 'information' by theie care providers which can sway them into making choiced that they are not really happy to make, but are told that dire consequences may ccur if they do not make the choice. This, to me, is coersion. I myself was given some atrocious 'facts' from several obstetricians and thankfully the fats were so rediculous that I saw through it, and decided to get second opinions. Many women would have been terrified by this and would have allowed the Dr to do what he intended on doing.
    At the end of the day, women are not informed enough. They are not given the correct, up to date information, are not offered alternatives, are not told the risks, pros and cons. Women are not respected and given responsibility to make their own informed choices. Woman are not supported.
    I believe the caesarean rate is on the rise due to fear of litigation, fear among consumers and overuse of intervention. Give a man a hammer and everything becomes a nail.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,066
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    1
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by ~Carlia~ View Post
    I think that in many cases women are given 'information' by theie care providers which can sway them into making choiced that they are not really happy to make, but are told that dire consequences may ccur if they do not make the choice. This, to me, is coersion.

    At the end of the day, women are not informed enough. They are not given the correct, up to date information, are not offered alternatives, are not told the risks, pros and cons. Women are not respected and given responsibility to make their own informed choices. Woman are not supported.
    Absolutely

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,530
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    2
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by ~Carlia~ View Post
    Stacey I totally agree with you.
    I think that in many cases women are given 'information' by theie care providers which can sway them into making choiced that they are not really happy to make, but are told that dire consequences may ccur if they do not make the choice. This, to me, is coersion. I myself was given some atrocious 'facts' from several obstetricians and thankfully the fats were so rediculous that I saw through it, and decided to get second opinions. Many women would have been terrified by this and would have allowed the Dr to do what he intended on doing.
    At the end of the day, women are not informed enough. They are not given the correct, up to date information, are not offered alternatives, are not told the risks, pros and cons. Women are not respected and given responsibility to make their own informed choices. Woman are not supported.
    I believe the caesarean rate is on the rise due to fear of litigation, fear among consumers and overuse of intervention. Give a man a hammer and everything becomes a nail.
    HEAR HEAR!

    I also think it is depressing when you hear people say that they are 'over' this topic.


    Women are being butchered physically, mentally and emotionally, and baby's denied their right to be born naturally, en masse, every day, and people are bored.....

    There really is not much compassion left in this cold world, is there.....


 

Similar Threads

  1. Older mums???
    By maartysmum in forum Pregnancy & Birth General Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 27-07-2012, 16:35
  2. Replies: 20
    Last Post: 27-04-2012, 12:03
  3. age gaps for children of 'older' mums :)
    By tweedibird75 in forum Pregnancy & Birth General Chat
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-02-2012, 17:14

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

FEATURED SUPPORTER
Prams and StrollersLooking to buy a pram or stroller? :: Viewer reviews of prams :: Pram Buyers ...
FORUMS - chatting now ...
Nub - Girl or Boy 12 + 4First Trimester Chat
Ttc 2021Conception & Fertility General Chat
I am...#22General Chat
Rude & annoying things people sayPregnancy & Birth General Chat
Cycles after miscarriagePregnancy Loss Support

ADVERTISEMENT