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  • Smoking - an addiction

    OK so i came across this on Facebook yesterday and the comments are pretty unanimous. I will share some comments later on.

    In a nutshell the guy is saying he's seriously addicted to smoking to the point he can't give up. He is the point where he is going to choose to stop paying rent because cigarettes are too expensive. He has tried everything to stop and goes without food to smoke.

    I'm curious to hear what you all think. I am related to someone with the same mentality as this person being interviewed yet also know lots of people who were heavy smokers who you would never think could give up bit did.

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/w0aJbuGi-lk

  • #2
    My parents were so severely addicted. My father gave up when my mother fell pregnant, my mother didn't. My father hasn't smoked since and my mother smokes to this day.
    He has more will power and smarts than she does in just about anything though. She is a very weak willed person, plus if you talk to her, she is adamant that the doctors just say you can die from smoking as a conspiracy to spite her. So I think there is an element of "I'll show them" to it. I honestly just think it really it dependant on the mentality of the person.

    Comment


    • #3
      My whole family are addicted to smoking. Smokes come first everything else second !!!! Some have tried to quit others dont even want to try and give up

      My brother who was a heavy smoker for 18 odd years recently quit and is doing fantastic i actually never thought he would be able to do it he has a mental illness which i thought would really hold him back from being able to quit
      Last edited by bunkx; 06-05-2017, 20:40.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Ahalfdozen View Post
        My parents were so severely addicted. My father gave up when my mother fell pregnant, my mother didn't. My father hasn't smoked since and my mother smokes to this day.
        He has more will power and smarts than she does in just about anything though. She is a very weak willed person, plus if you talk to her, she is adamant that the doctors just say you can die from smoking as a conspiracy to spite her. So I think there is an element of "I'll show them" to it. I honestly just think it really it dependant on the mentality of the person.
        We could be related. Almost identical story for me.

        Comment


        • #5
          My mother is a very heavy smoker who refuses to believe it's harmful also. She believes environmental pollution is worse so sees no issues with smoking at the dinner table [emoji15][emoji15] she's also a very respected member of the medical profession so this view is at odds with everything else she believes but hey, that's the addiction.
          Last time I saw her I was 6 weeks pregnant (she didn't know) and I was petrified her chain smoking indoors would cause a miscarriage. I'm now 23 weeks and have told her she won't be able to smoke within half an hour of seeing her grandchildren (if she even chooses to meet them. Another story). She believes I am being cruel as she can't help her smoking and 'it's not even bad for your health / you turned out ok' so this speaks volumes to me. Never mind the host of illnesses I had directly attributable to smoking but whatevs I guess...
          Why anyone would start smoking is beyond me; I grew up surrounded by it and have never even thought of touching one!!

          Comment


          • #6
            no words. you're an idiot if you'd forego paying rent in favour of charring back on cancer sticks. he looks like an absolute derro bogan anyway so who cares what he thinks or says.

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            • #7
              Husband is a smoker and it's taken a long time for him to see the extent to which his addiction has harmed our finances and therefore our relationship. This past month he's worked on tapering down, and for a week he hasn't had one cigarette. No sneaky packets working their way into the house, no desperately finding half-smoked butts he's stashed in case of emergency (yes, really, he's done that many times). It's amazing! I don't understand the addiction and it's incredibly frustrating to deal with. The ridiculousness of the guy in the article is no surprise.

              Comment


              • #8
                Smoking - an addiction

                Firstly, I hate smoking, I think it's gross and while I tried a cigarette as a teen, I've never been a smoker. But I do feel sorry for people of that guys age who started smoking when the health impacts weren't known and are now being impacted by the government trying to stop people smoking with little or no support. I read an article once and it made so much sense; let current smokers continue to smoke but anyone born after X date are not legally allowed to smoke or buy cigarettes. In one generation, smoking will be eradicated! But of course the government wouldn't do that as they'd lose too much money.
                Last edited by JR03; 06-05-2017, 19:19.

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                • #9
                  OK so every single comment on this video that was on Facebook was pretty much saying he's an idiot and should just grow a pair and give up. They also went on to state that if he was that hard up he would sell his Harley that's sitting in the background and as a little FYI to him, his rental agreement will likely not be extended come next lease end purely based on those comments.

                  He made a few good points about the government needing to offer more help and possibly make the move to ban them completely if they are so bad for your health but he lost all credibility when he went as far as to say he can't go without cigarettes and will forgo food instead and he will resort to stealing them at the next price rise.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sorry in advance for the essay but as a public health professional, ex-smoker and being related to someone similar to that in the story I can see all sides of this issue.
                    The fact remains that cigarettes are the only legal product that if used as intended will kill 1/2 to 2/3 of those who use them. There is no way that such a product would ever be legalized if discovered now! If the government was truly serious about reducing the long term burden of disease arising from smoking it would have been banned outright years ago. However the tobacco industry and smokers form a powerful bloc and the government reaps significant tax in the form of tobacco excise.
                    My father is 66 and was a life-long smoker and 'unable' to quit like the guy in this story. I truly never thought he would. He was a pack-plus a day smoker. When my dd was born I told my parents they weren't to touch or cuddle her if they'd been smoking. Took my mum (who had been an on-off smoker for years) to a SIDS workshop where they explained cigarette smoke as a huge SIDS risk and the way babies snuggle in and breathe in the residual vapors from clothes worn while smoking. This stopped my mum but not my dad. However when dd was about 4 months old he spontaneously quit as he wanted more closeness with her and realized this would come through quitting. I was shocked as he had tried and never succeeded and was a hardened smoker. It's been a year and a half now and he hasn't gone back. I'm so proud, it was super hard work and smoking was a massive part of his life for 50 years. Imagine giving up something you enjoyed and loved after that long!
                    It is incredibly hard for people at that stage of life to quit and can take more than 10 times to succeed.
                    In my teaching I explain to students that as health professionals the hardest thing we will ever do is try to influence behavior change in individuals. We can all sit back and say 'smoking is gross I would never harm my health in that way'. But how many of us can hand on heart say we don't engage in other health-damaging behaviors like not meeting physical activity guidelines, drinking more than 2 standard drinks a day, not getting our 2&5 every day, never speeding in the car etc? Most people know these things are 'bad' yet still do them so the way to change these behaviours is often not through education (they know it's bad so education has worked) but understanding the drivers of these behaviours (internal and external factors) and working on those.
                    So very long story short my point is I choose not to judge smokers as I understand there is a whole bunch of reasons which keep people in that position and on paper it might seem as simple as 'just stop smoking/overeating/drinking booze' but under the surface it's much much harder than that.
                    For the record I support the government policy towards tobacco control of denormalisation and believe we will eventually see this creep into alcohol policy over time hopefully as our understanding of the role of alcohol in cancer and other disease grows.
                    What's truly revolting is seeing what tobacco companies are getting away with in developing countries right now and the enormous burden of disease we will see in the coming decades as smoking rates are huge and growing in many low income countries. Sorry for the tangent but it's really given no attention and it's a looming public health crisis [emoji51]

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My mum was a very heavy smoker. She had her first stroke in her early 40's and another one 5 years later. She always believed that smoking isn't as bad as it's made out to be and that she'll smoke until she dies. Well last year her personality started to change and she had another stroke and set her hair on fire, then she was hospitalised for a week. Her brain was too affected this time and a few weeks later she passed away.
                      I have always dis liked cigarettes, but after seeing how Mum got I hate them even more. There needs to be more help available to quit.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by gingermillie View Post
                        Sorry in advance for the essay but as a public health professional, ex-smoker and being related to someone similar to that in the story I can see all sides of this issue.
                        The fact remains that cigarettes are the only legal product that if used as intended will kill 1/2 to 2/3 of those who use them. There is no way that such a product would ever be legalized if discovered now! If the government was truly serious about reducing the long term burden of disease arising from smoking it would have been banned outright years ago. However the tobacco industry and smokers form a powerful bloc and the government reaps significant tax in the form of tobacco excise.
                        My father is 66 and was a life-long smoker and 'unable' to quit like the guy in this story. I truly never thought he would. He was a pack-plus a day smoker. When my dd was born I told my parents they weren't to touch or cuddle her if they'd been smoking. Took my mum (who had been an on-off smoker for years) to a SIDS workshop where they explained cigarette smoke as a huge SIDS risk and the way babies snuggle in and breathe in the residual vapors from clothes worn while smoking. This stopped my mum but not my dad. However when dd was about 4 months old he spontaneously quit as he wanted more closeness with her and realized this would come through quitting. I was shocked as he had tried and never succeeded and was a hardened smoker. It's been a year and a half now and he hasn't gone back. I'm so proud, it was super hard work and smoking was a massive part of his life for 50 years. Imagine giving up something you enjoyed and loved after that long!
                        It is incredibly hard for people at that stage of life to quit and can take more than 10 times to succeed.
                        In my teaching I explain to students that as health professionals the hardest thing we will ever do is try to influence behavior change in individuals. We can all sit back and say 'smoking is gross I would never harm my health in that way'. But how many of us can hand on heart say we don't engage in other health-damaging behaviors like not meeting physical activity guidelines, drinking more than 2 standard drinks a day, not getting our 2&5 every day, never speeding in the car etc? Most people know these things are 'bad' yet still do them so the way to change these behaviours is often not through education (they know it's bad so education has worked) but understanding the drivers of these behaviours (internal and external factors) and working on those.
                        So very long story short my point is I choose not to judge smokers as I understand there is a whole bunch of reasons which keep people in that position and on paper it might seem as simple as 'just stop smoking/overeating/drinking booze' but under the surface it's much much harder than that.
                        For the record I support the government policy towards tobacco control of denormalisation and believe we will eventually see this creep into alcohol policy over time hopefully as our understanding of the role of alcohol in cancer and other disease grows.
                        What's truly revolting is seeing what tobacco companies are getting away with in developing countries right now and the enormous burden of disease we will see in the coming decades as smoking rates are huge and growing in many low income countries. Sorry for the tangent but it's really given no attention and it's a looming public health crisis [emoji51]
                        I understand where your coming from.

                        On one hand I fully agree with the majority that he should grow up and quit and stop being such a whiner about it.

                        On the other hand I think the duty of care on the interviewer to create a thought provoking piece that highlighted certain aspects of the addiction and the governments role in it was highly negligent and thus made a mockery of what could have been a fantastic interview.

                        The topic had so much potential to be a thought provoking piece has turned to almost ridiculing the interviewee. But, maybe that was the point. Maybe making a mockery of the excuses some smokers use and how far some are willing to go for a cigarette was the point.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have never been a smoker but I have seen many friends over the years quit smoking. Some found it easy, lots found it hard, some found it ridiculously hard. I do wonder whether there is some kind of chemical makeup in people that makes it harder for some to quit than others. Obviously things like stress and depression, and who you live with and hang out with make a huge difference. Its very hard to quit if your partner smokes, for example.

                          I am seriously addicted to coffee. I get a headache if I don't have one in the morning. So I sympathise with people who do have an addiction, especially if they started before it was known how bad the thing actually is for you. Would I give up coffee if I knew it was killing me though? Of course! (I gave it up when pregnant). But ciggies are much more addictive than coffee.

                          My Dad took 20 years to quit, although for the last 10 he only smoked about 3 a day. I'm really proud of him for doing that

                          While I sympathise with the guy for being addicted, I wouldn't sympathise with him for not paying his rent. Because thats not fair on the landlord! I think he should try to cut down if he is that bad, even if he cant quit.
                          Last edited by DynamiteandaLazerBeam; 11-05-2017, 22:46.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I haven't had a ciggie in 3 years. When I finally did kick the habit after 20 years smoking on and off, it really wasn't that hard. But I truly wanted to give up. The truth is, after 3 years I still crave them. Not constantly but when drinking or stressed out.

                            I would like to see them banned. I'm so tired of the govt taking advantage of people's addictions with the insane taxes they make people pay. If they actually put this into quit smoking aids, free hypnosis etc, I'd support it. But the billions a year goes into general revenue. Yes, long term smokers can sometimes be a drain on the health system. But many, like me, have never had a smoking related issue. Ban the bloody things and stop sapping off addicted people!!

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